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Thread: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

  1. #1
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    Yesterday began with 72 degrees at 6:00 a.m. and got colder. By
    mid-morning it was raining, breezy (felt good at first), and cold. I
    took my last bag of chicken backs from the freezer and thawed them in a
    pot of water in the kitchen sink, cleaned them a bit and made a vat of
    shicken soup.

    On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    of saffron for color.

    The kettle simmered for a couple-three hours or so and I picked off
    enough meat for two bowlsful for last night's dinner. I poured the hot
    soup over some Amish-made noodles purchased in Indiana.

    So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    tasteless.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

  2. #2
    flitterbit Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > Yesterday began with 72 degrees at 6:00 a.m. and got colder. By
    > mid-morning it was raining, breezy (felt good at first), and cold. I
    > took my last bag of chicken backs from the freezer and thawed them in a
    > pot of water in the kitchen sink, cleaned them a bit and made a vat of
    > shicken soup.
    >
    > On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    > commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    > too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    > of saffron for color.
    >
    > The kettle simmered for a couple-three hours or so and I picked off
    > enough meat for two bowlsful for last night's dinner. I poured the hot
    > soup over some Amish-made noodles purchased in Indiana.
    >
    > So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > tasteless.
    >
    >

    How did you like the addition of rosemary? I always include it when
    roasting chicken, but haven't added it to soup yet ...

  3. #3
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles


    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Yesterday began with 72 degrees at 6:00 a.m. and got colder. By
    > mid-morning it was raining, breezy (felt good at first), and cold. I
    > took my last bag of chicken backs from the freezer and thawed them in a
    > pot of water in the kitchen sink, cleaned them a bit and made a vat of
    > shicken soup.
    >
    > On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    > commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    > too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    > of saffron for color.
    >
    > The kettle simmered for a couple-three hours or so and I picked off
    > enough meat for two bowlsful for last night's dinner. I poured the hot
    > soup over some Amish-made noodles purchased in Indiana.
    >
    > So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > tasteless.



    Amish "spicing" is pretty underwhelming, Barb, their food is the essence of
    "plain food"...


    --
    Best
    Greg




  4. #4
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    In article <gd30ed$6fi$[email protected]>,
    flitterbit <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    (snip)
    > > On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    > > commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    > > too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    > > of saffron for color.


    > How did you like the addition of rosemary? I always include it when
    > roasting chicken, but haven't added it to soup yet ...


    I think it is rather nice and something I will do again. The piece I
    added to the kettle was about 4" long. (Yeay, Arri!!)

    I bought some bulk-packaged chicken base at Yoder's Red Barn store in
    Shipshewana and used a fair amount of that , too. It enabled me to
    increase the volume of my soup by about a half gallon.

    I'll defat the rest of it tonight and freeze some 3-cup packages of
    broth. I love chicken soup. And I love my own homemade noodles with
    it. :-)

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:


    > > So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    > > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > > tasteless.

    >
    >
    > Amish "spicing" is pretty underwhelming, Barb, their food is the essence of
    > "plain food"...


    I don't mind plain food. Most of what I prepare is pretty plain
    compared to many folks who contribute here. These noodles are just
    plain blah.

    I checked the ingredient list on the package. No salt. Explains
    everything.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

  6. #6
    flitterbit Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <gd30ed$6fi$[email protected]>,
    > flitterbit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > (snip)
    >>> On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    >>> commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    >>> too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    >>> of saffron for color.

    >
    >> How did you like the addition of rosemary? I always include it when
    >> roasting chicken, but haven't added it to soup yet ...

    >
    > I think it is rather nice and something I will do again. The piece I
    > added to the kettle was about 4" long. (Yeay, Arri!!)
    >
    > I bought some bulk-packaged chicken base at Yoder's Red Barn store in
    > Shipshewana and used a fair amount of that , too. It enabled me to
    > increase the volume of my soup by about a half gallon.
    >
    > I'll defat the rest of it tonight and freeze some 3-cup packages of
    > broth. I love chicken soup. And I love my own homemade noodles with
    > it. :-)
    >
    >

    Sounds really good; I think I'll add some rosemary to my next batch

  7. #7
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Yesterday began with 72 degrees at 6:00 a.m. and got colder. By
    > mid-morning it was raining, breezy (felt good at first), and cold. I
    > took my last bag of chicken backs from the freezer and thawed them in a
    > pot of water in the kitchen sink, cleaned them a bit and made a vat of
    > shicken soup.
    >
    > On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    > commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    > too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    > of saffron for color.
    >
    > The kettle simmered for a couple-three hours or so and I picked off
    > enough meat for two bowlsful for last night's dinner. I poured the hot
    > soup over some Amish-made noodles purchased in Indiana.
    >
    > So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > tasteless.


    My 14 year old son likes great big thick Amish noodles - the kind that
    take 20 minutes of boiling in seriously salty water to be edible.

    He eats them with butter and sea salt and considers them a delicacy.


  8. #8
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    Melba's Jammin' <barbschaller@earthlink.net> wrote:

    > So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > tasteless.


    The Amish noodles we used to get in PA really sucked. They broke
    apart and were mushy. I bought some a few months ago just for
    kicks, and I did - kicked myself in the head.

    I only buy the stuff from the factories or the Chinese grocer.

    -sw

  9. #9
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles



    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > In article <gd30ed$6fi$[email protected]>,
    > flitterbit <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > (snip)
    > > > On Saturday I'd bought a couple parsnips for just such a recipe and
    > > > commenced to making soup. I put in a nice-size sprig of fresh rosemary,
    > > > too. I don't usually include that in my soup. I added a couple pinches
    > > > of saffron for color.

    >
    > > How did you like the addition of rosemary? I always include it when
    > > roasting chicken, but haven't added it to soup yet ...

    >
    > I think it is rather nice and something I will do again. The piece I
    > added to the kettle was about 4" long. (Yeay, Arri!!)


    LOL. Use it wisely; have harvested as much as we care to cut off for
    now. No more until the spring!

    >
    > I bought some bulk-packaged chicken base at Yoder's Red Barn store in
    > Shipshewana and used a fair amount of that , too. It enabled me to
    > increase the volume of my soup by about a half gallon.
    >
    > I'll defat the rest of it tonight and freeze some 3-cup packages of
    > broth. I love chicken soup. And I love my own homemade noodles with
    > it. :-)
    >
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    > On the Road Again - It is Finished


  10. #10
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >> So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine

    > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > tasteless.


    I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a side-effect.



  11. #11
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    dejablues <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    > Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a side-effect.


    Whadya mean? Horehound candy has LOTS of flavor!

    -sw

  12. #12
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    "dejablues" <[email protected]>
    news:gd3dhb$urg$[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>> So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as
    >>> fine

    >> cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check
    >> the ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were
    >> pretty tasteless.

    >
    > I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    > Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a
    > side-effect.


    That has always been my experience when I'd visit the Amish communities in
    Illinois. The food was never what I would consider "fine". However, the
    Amish make some fantastic quilts.

    Michael

    --
    October 10, 1795

    Mint hires first women - The United States Mint hired its first two female
    employees on this day in 1795. They were put to work as adjusters.

    Find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  13. #13
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    In article <gd3dhb$urg$[email protected]>,
    "dejablues" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >> So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine

    > > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    > > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    > > tasteless.

    >
    > I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    > Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a side-effect.


    :-) Thanks.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

  14. #14
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    In article <[email protected] 0>,
    "Michael \"Dog3\"" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "dejablues" <[email protected]>


    > > I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.


    > Illinois. The food was never what I would consider "fine". However, the
    > Amish make some fantastic quilts.
    >
    > Michael


    I used the word 'fine' to mean competent and better than average. I
    might have just said "good cooks."

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

  15. #15
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    On Tue 14 Oct 2008 07:45:50p, Melba's Jammin' told us...

    > In article <gd3dhb$urg$[email protected]>,
    > "dejablues" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> >> So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as
    >> >> fine
    >> > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check
    >> > the ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were
    >> > pretty tasteless.

    >>
    >> I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    >> Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a
    >> side-effect.

    >
    >:-) Thanks.
    >


    They do bake some of the most delicious pies I've ever eaten. In fact,
    eating in various restaurants in Ohio's Amish country, I don't recall ever
    having a bad meal. There's no doubt that this is not gourmet cooking, nor
    is it meant to be, but most of it is very tasty home-style cooking. The
    fact that it is not usually highly seasoned may not appeal to some.

    "Cooking From Quilt Country", "Heirloom Recipes", and other books by Marcia
    Adams are a tribute to many of the best Amish recipes.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    (correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)

    *******************************************
    Date: Tuesday, 10(X)/14(XIV)/08(MMVIII)
    *******************************************
    Countdown till Veteran's Day
    3wks 6dys 4hrs 13mins
    *******************************************
    It's all in the mind, ya know.
    *******************************************

  16. #16
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <gd3dhb$urg$[email protected]>,
    > "dejablues" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> >> So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as
    >> >> fine
    >> > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    >> > ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    >> > tasteless.

    >>
    >> I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    >> Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a side-effect.

    >
    > :-) Thanks.


    Heh. I abhor the Amish, I think they suck all around, in every aspect of
    life. I wish PA was rid of them. My fondest hope is that they will inbreed
    themselves out of existence.



  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 17:12:25 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I think it is rather nice and something I will do again. The piece I
    >added to the kettle was about 4" long. (Yeay, Arri!!)


    Try stripping the needles chopping them next time.


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    On Tue, 14 Oct 2008 15:21:37 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >The kettle simmered for a couple-three hours or so and I picked off
    >enough meat for two bowlsful for last night's dinner. I poured the hot
    >soup over some Amish-made noodles purchased in Indiana.
    >
    >So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as fine
    >cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check the
    >ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were pretty
    >tasteless.


    If they were dried, did you reconstitute/cook them in salted water?


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  19. #19
    Ms P Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 5.61...
    >>

    >
    > They do bake some of the most delicious pies I've ever eaten. In fact,
    > eating in various restaurants in Ohio's Amish country, I don't recall ever
    > having a bad meal. There's no doubt that this is not gourmet cooking, nor
    > is it meant to be, but most of it is very tasty home-style cooking. The
    > fact that it is not usually highly seasoned may not appeal to some.
    >
    > "Cooking From Quilt Country", "Heirloom Recipes", and other books by
    > Marcia
    > Adams are a tribute to many of the best Amish recipes.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    > (correct the spelling of "geemail" to reply)
    >


    The best chicken fried steak and pie I've ever had was at a little Mennonite
    restuarant.

    Ms P


  20. #20
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Shicken soup and Amish noodles

    In article <[email protected] >,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Tue 14 Oct 2008 07:45:50p, Melba's Jammin' told us...
    >
    > > In article <gd3dhb$urg$[email protected]>,
    > > "dejablues" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >> news:[email protected]..
    > >> >> So far I have yet to understand why the Amish enjoy a reputation as
    > >> >> fine
    > >> > cooks. I was underwhelmed with these noodles. I'll have to check
    > >> > the ingredient list to see if there was any salt in them; they were
    > >> > pretty tasteless.
    > >>
    > >> I'm not sure where you got the idea that the Amish are fine cooks.
    > >> Amish food is meant to be filling and cheap. Tastiness is a
    > >> side-effect.

    > >
    > >:-) Thanks.
    > >

    >
    > They do bake some of the most delicious pies I've ever eaten. In fact,
    > eating in various restaurants in Ohio's Amish country, I don't recall ever
    > having a bad meal. There's no doubt that this is not gourmet cooking, nor
    > is it meant to be, but most of it is very tasty home-style cooking. The
    > fact that it is not usually highly seasoned may not appeal to some.


    I'm inclined to agree about the baking vs the cooking, Wayne. I ate an
    incredibly delicious cinnamon roll on my trip that I would attribute to
    an Amish woman's skill. AFA the lack of seasoning goes, I don't mind
    that. I'm a pretty plain cook, myself. AFA it being gourmet cooking,
    I remember a conversation with Judith Bell, then editor of the
    Minneapolis Star Tribune's Taste section, and her comment that 'gourmet'
    really means well-prepared. She was talking about meatloaf; that, done
    well, it could be a gourmet meal. That a bunch of expensive ingredients
    does not, of itself, mean gourmet food. :-)
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, Thelma and Louise
    On the Road Again - It is Finished

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