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Thread: She Scores!!

  1. #1
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default She Scores!!

    My rib roast came with a packet of rib roast rub; I used about half on
    the meat as directed on its packet. I didn't dry salt the meat, just
    let it sit on the counter for a couple hours before doing it the way
    Terry Pulliam Burd recommended: 450 degrees for 30 minutes, then 325
    until I was ready for it. I pulled it out when the Polder said 138
    degrees (I was looking for medium doneness). The temp continued to rise
    a bit while it rested.

    I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!

    I made a critical error, though‹must've been a brain fart. I really
    needed another 1-1/2 pounds of mass, I think. Three and one-half pounds
    was light ‹ I'd forgotten that the bones would probably weigh a half
    pound and there was probably 4-6 ounces of fat. And my son-in-law is a
    big meat eater. The only leftovers are the two bones (what do I do with
    those? Anything?), though all said they'd had enough. *I* would have
    liked a 1" thick piece for steak and eggs in the morning. :-) Next
    year it'll be at least a 5# roast. I'll start saving for it next week.
    :-)

    I made jus using some beef base-cum-broth bought in Amish country in
    Indiana in October with the additions of celery leaves, parsley, carrot,
    rosemary, worcestershire, and soy sauce. I simmered it then strained it
    and made it available at table.

    My stock closed high at the end of the day's trading. '-)

    Rob and Sam and I stayed home this evening while the three big kids went
    off to their annual Christmas evening movie. They've just returned from
    "Four Christmases" or something like that. Excuse me while I go protect
    some cookies.

    I baked another batch of the Scandinavian Almond Bars so they can take
    some to Jamie's folks tomorrow for their celebration there.

    Thanks for all the recommendations and suggestions for roasting the meat.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    <http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor>
    "I have fixed my roof, I have mended my fences;
    now let the winter winds blow."

  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    [snip]

    >I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    >dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    >like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    >"this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!


    [snip]

    Wonderful, Barb! Congratulations!

    Steve

  3. #3
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > My rib roast came with a packet of rib roast rub; I used about half on
    > the meat as directed on its packet. I didn't dry salt the meat, just
    > let it sit on the counter for a couple hours before doing it the way
    > Terry Pulliam Burd recommended: 450 degrees for 30 minutes, then 325
    > until I was ready for it. I pulled it out when the Polder said 138
    > degrees (I was looking for medium doneness). The temp continued to
    > rise
    > a bit while it rested.


    We're having rib roast for New Year's, I'll follow these directions.
    Or, he will. Heh.

    > I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull
    > one,
    > dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it.
    > Words
    > like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    > "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!


    Success!
    >
    > I made a critical error, though > needed another 1-1/2 pounds of
    > mass, I think. Three and one-half pounds was light < I'd forgotten
    > that the bones would probably weigh a half
    > pound and there was probably 4-6 ounces of fat. And my son-in-law is
    > a
    > big meat eater. The only leftovers are the two bones (what do I do
    > with
    > those? Anything?), though all said they'd had enough. *I* would have
    > liked a 1" thick piece for steak and eggs in the morning. :-) Next
    > year it'll be at least a 5# roast. I'll start saving for it next
    > week. :-)


    I have made beef stock with the leftover bones, it came out
    very tasty.

    > I made jus using some beef base-cum-broth bought in Amish country in
    > Indiana in October with the additions of celery leaves, parsley,
    > carrot,
    > rosemary, worcestershire, and soy sauce. I simmered it then strained
    > it
    > and made it available at table.
    >
    > My stock closed high at the end of the day's trading. '-)


    (laugh) Finally!! The respect you deserve! If those ribbons
    didn't already do it.

    I'm glad you had a great day.

    nancy

  4. #4
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > [..] The only leftovers are the two bones (what
    > do I do with those? Anything?) [..]


    Two years ago, we had 9 bones left over from the prime rib. I
    asked for and was given them. That night, I brought them home,
    browned them up, and stored them for the following day. I ended
    up making a really rich beef stew. I was surprised by the
    amount of meat that came away from the bones; my FIL is very
    gifted with using knives.

    I used my Rival 5-quart crock pot; started the stew on low at
    7am and we ate at 6pm. I layered chopped celery and onions, a
    couple cloves of garlic along the bottom, the bones, cubed
    potatoes and sliced carrots atop that, and finished it with a
    cup of broth saved from the previous day.

    Serve with a fresh loaf of bread and enjoy.

    The Ranger



  5. #5
    Marcella Peek Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    Sounds delicious!

    We like to douse the bones in our favorite bbq sauce and bake them. Yum.

    This is what we like to do with the leftover roast (for next year for
    you)

    Prime Rib Sandwiches
    from Fine Cooking magazine

    For the Dijonnaise
    6 cloves garlic, peeled
    3 sprigs rosemary (3-4 inches each)
    1 T olive oil
    several pinches salt
    1/4 C mayonnaise
    1 t dijon mustard

    For the sandwiches
    4 sandwich rolls
    12 ounces thinly sliced prime rib (about 2 C)
    2 C sliced onions, sauteed until golden
    2 C sliced mushrooms, sauteed

    Heat the oven to 350 degrees. *Put the garlic in the center of a square
    of foil, arrange the rosemary sprigs on top. *Drizzle with oil and
    sprinkle with salt. *Gather the foil into a pouch and place on a pie
    plate or other baking pan. *Roast until the garlic is completely soft,
    about 30 minutes. *Discard rosemary. *Mash garlic in a small bowl and
    combine with mayonnaise, mustard and 1/2 t of the oil left from roasting
    the garlic. *Add salt to taste.

    Position a rack 3 - 4 inches from the broiler and heat the broiler on
    high. *Slice the rolls in half, set cut sides up on the baking sheet.
    *Brush with oil and toast until bread is golden. *Spread some dijonnaise
    on the rolls. *Arrange beef over the bottom half along with the onions
    and mushrooms and replace tops.

    marcella

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My rib roast came with a packet of rib roast rub; I used about half on
    > the meat as directed on its packet. I didn't dry salt the meat, just
    > let it sit on the counter for a couple hours before doing it the way
    > Terry Pulliam Burd recommended: 450 degrees for 30 minutes, then 325
    > until I was ready for it. I pulled it out when the Polder said 138
    > degrees (I was looking for medium doneness). The temp continued to rise
    > a bit while it rested.
    >
    > I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    > dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    > like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    > "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!
    >
    > I made a critical error, though‹must've been a brain fart. I really
    > needed another 1-1/2 pounds of mass, I think. Three and one-half pounds
    > was light ‹ I'd forgotten that the bones would probably weigh a half
    > pound and there was probably 4-6 ounces of fat. And my son-in-law is a
    > big meat eater. The only leftovers are the two bones (what do I do with
    > those? Anything?), though all said they'd had enough. *I* would have
    > liked a 1" thick piece for steak and eggs in the morning. :-) Next
    > year it'll be at least a 5# roast. I'll start saving for it next week.
    > :-)
    >
    > I made jus using some beef base-cum-broth bought in Amish country in
    > Indiana in October with the additions of celery leaves, parsley, carrot,
    > rosemary, worcestershire, and soy sauce. I simmered it then strained it
    > and made it available at table.
    >
    > My stock closed high at the end of the day's trading. '-)
    >
    > Rob and Sam and I stayed home this evening while the three big kids went
    > off to their annual Christmas evening movie. They've just returned from
    > "Four Christmases" or something like that. Excuse me while I go protect
    > some cookies.
    >
    > I baked another batch of the Scandinavian Almond Bars so they can take
    > some to Jamie's folks tomorrow for their celebration there.
    >
    > Thanks for all the recommendations and suggestions for roasting the meat.


  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    > dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    > like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    > "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!


    Congrats! :-) I have yet to try one of those. The ones at our local
    store labeled "prime" were running around $90.00 per roast. <sigh>

    Maybe when I can afford to purchase a whole calf again..... <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive." -- Dalai Lama

  7. #7
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    Omelet wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    >> dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    >> like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    >> "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!

    >
    > Congrats! :-) I have yet to try one of those. The ones at our local
    > store labeled "prime" were running around $90.00 per roast. <sigh>
    >


    Ours, from Costco, was $7.99/lb, or $67. Not cheap, but once a year I
    bite the bullet. It was superb.

    gloria p

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    > >> dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    > >> like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    > >> "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!

    > >
    > > Congrats! :-) I have yet to try one of those. The ones at our local
    > > store labeled "prime" were running around $90.00 per roast. <sigh>
    > >

    >
    > Ours, from Costco, was $7.99/lb, or $67. Not cheap, but once a year I
    > bite the bullet. It was superb.
    >
    > gloria p


    <grin> After Chris and I went out this morning to cash in some gift
    cards at Coldwater and the Apple Store (conveniently located within ±100
    feet of each other at the Mall of America we went to Penzeys in
    Lakeville (he's become a fan). While he was shopping I was jawing with
    the store manager about our rib roast dinners. I told her about my
    mis-step with the size I bought and asked her how big hers was ‹‹ 12#
    from a specialty butcher chain in the area. $150 for a rolled rib roast
    and she has a third of it leftover. I gave her our schedule of
    availability and she said she'd get back to me. '-) Actually, we
    decided I'll start a jar for collecting loose change with which to buy
    next year's. :-)

    I'm glad yours was a success, too. Did you do anything about juice?
    Oh, wait ‹ you said you made yorkshire pudding.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    <http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor>
    "I have fixed my roof, I have mended my fences;
    now let the winter winds blow."

  9. #9
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    On Fri, 26 Dec 2008 07:05:30 -0500, "Nancy Young"
    <[email protected]> fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >> My rib roast came with a packet of rib roast rub; I used about half on
    >> the meat as directed on its packet. I didn't dry salt the meat, just
    >> let it sit on the counter for a couple hours before doing it the way
    >> Terry Pulliam Burd recommended: 450 degrees for 30 minutes, then 325
    >> until I was ready for it. I pulled it out when the Polder said 138
    >> degrees (I was looking for medium doneness). The temp continued to
    >> rise
    >> a bit while it rested.

    >
    >We're having rib roast for New Year's, I'll follow these directions.
    >Or, he will. Heh.


    No, no, don't thank me. Providing the Perfect Method for Roasting
    Prime Rib is but a small thing and the least I could do during this
    season of good will and cookingcentric madness. Besides, I stole the
    technique from James Beard to start with :-)

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    - Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  10. #10
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    On Fri, 26 Dec 2008 12:25:14 -0700, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    fired up random neurons and synapses to opine:

    >Omelet wrote:
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I had the dinner plates in a sinkful of hot water and had Beck pull one,
    >>> dry it, and hand it to me so I could put a slice of roast on it. Words
    >>> like, "this is awesome," and "You outdid yourself, Brown Eyes," and
    >>> "this is just perfect, Barbara." LOL!

    >>
    >> Congrats! :-) I have yet to try one of those. The ones at our local
    >> store labeled "prime" were running around $90.00 per roast. <sigh>
    >>

    >
    >Ours, from Costco, was $7.99/lb, or $67. Not cheap, but once a year I
    >bite the bullet. It was superb.


    Well, you got my roast, then, b/c the one the DH ordered from Costco
    was bland and flavorless. He ordered the boneless ribeye roast and it
    was very disappointing. The temperature was perfect, but it wasn't as
    tender as a ribeye should be and, as I said, was tasteless. Going back
    to Stater Bros. next year.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    "If the soup had been as hot as the claret, if the claret had been as
    old as the bird, and if the bird's breasts had been as full as the
    waitress's, it would have been a very good dinner."

    - Duncan Hines

    To reply, replace "meatloaf" with "cox"





  11. #11
    Virginia Tadrzynski Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote:
    >

    snippage
    Actually, we decided I'll start a jar for collecting loose change with
    which to buy
    > next year's. :-)
    >
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > <http://www.caringbridge.org/visit/amytaylor>
    > "I have fixed my roof, I have mended my fences;
    > now let the winter winds blow."



    Try putting a Glad/Ziploc plastic container on the shelf above the washing
    machine/dryer with a coin slot on the top of it. Our motto is 'If it is
    less than $5 and Mom finds it in your pockets......it is fair game.' (over
    $5, I 'compassionately return it' after a lecture on carelessness - hubby
    still doesn't listen). Drop the change in the container and you will be
    surprised at how fast it adds up.
    -ginny



  12. #12
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: She Scores!!

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    > On Fri, 26 Dec 2008 12:25:14 -0700, Gloria P <[email protected]>


    >>>

    >> Ours, from Costco...was superb.

    >
    > Well, you got my roast, then, b/c the one the DH ordered from Costco
    > was bland and flavorless. He ordered the boneless ribeye roast and it
    > was very disappointing. The temperature was perfect, but it wasn't as
    > tender as a ribeye should be and, as I said, was tasteless. Going back
    > to Stater Bros. next year.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    The one I got wasn't boneless; it had the curved rib bones but the
    end/chine bones were removed. I doubt that would make much difference
    in flavor.

    gloria p

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