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Thread: Settlement Cookbook??

  1. #1
    BeartoothGiG Guest

    Default Settlement Cookbook??


    It must have been well-known in its time : I've seen a Nineteenth
    Edition. But there is nothing to indicate what settlement they mean,
    other than the fact that some other names mentioned seem to belong in
    Southern Wisconsin ...

    Anybody know anything??
    --
    Beartooth Staffwright, Neo-Redneck Not Quite Clueless Power User
    I have precious (very precious!) little idea where up is.

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    On Aug 4, 11:50*am, BeartoothGiG <bearto...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > * * * * It must have been well-known in its time : I've seen a Nineteenth
    > Edition. But there is nothing to indicate what settlement they mean,
    > other than the fact that some other names mentioned seem to belong in
    > Southern Wisconsin ...


    Google/Bing "Feeding America" and you'll find actual copies of many of
    these very old classics. More than you wanted to know about this one:
    ---------
    This book is a splendid example of an American charity cookbook which
    went on to influence our cuisine for almost one hundred years. It
    began its life as a fundraiser for the Jewish Settlement House in
    Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Upon its first printing, it was an immediate
    success and was reprinted, in revised and enlarged editions, until
    almost the beginning of the 21st century. It was, or course, totally
    unrecognizable in its later printings. However, funds were raised for
    all kinds of charitable causes in Milwaukee for the first seventy-five
    years of its life. A rather remarkable contribution.

    From its earliest printings, the recipes were not kosher and included
    lobster and shellfish. There were also many dishes of German origin,
    reflecting the German Jewish community in Milwaukee. The chapter on
    Kuchen includes those called Coffee or Sugar, Tarts, Good, Bundt,
    Apple, Poppy Seed, Berliner Pfann, Cheese and Blueberry as well as
    Filled Walnut Kipfel and Schnecken. Among the Jewish dishes were
    Matzos Pancakes, Matzos Balls, Filled Fish, Kugel, Matzos Pudding.
    Many of the recipes present an amalgam of German, Eastern European and
    Jewish cooking.

    By 1991 two million copies of The Settlement Cookbook had been sold.
    It was an American classic, especially in the Midwest. A completely
    revised and updated version, renamed The New Settlement Cookbook,
    edited by Charles Pierce, was issued in 1991, subtitled "The First
    Classic Collection of American Ethnic Recipes."
    ----------



  3. #3
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    On Tue, 4 Aug 2009 13:42:41 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Aug 4, 11:50*am, BeartoothGiG <bearto...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> * * * * It must have been well-known in its time : I've seen a Nineteenth
    >> Edition. But there is nothing to indicate what settlement they mean,
    >> other than the fact that some other names mentioned seem to belong in
    >> Southern Wisconsin ...

    >
    >Google/Bing "Feeding America" and you'll find actual copies of many of
    >these very old classics. More than you wanted to know about this one:
    >---------

    [snip>

    This is intriguing. My Mom swore by the the SCB, which she
    grew up with, but she was a Hungarian Catholic (Byzantine
    Rite). I have a replica of the 1903 version. Somewhere, in
    storage, I have Mom's, with its paper sack bookcover. It dates
    from the '30's.

    FWIW: There are no pork recipes in my early edition.

    Yet, a question. Was there a need for a settlement for
    the millions of Jews who settled in the Milwaukee area?
    My understanding was that it was a place for young girls/
    immigrants, the majority would have been from the
    Scandanavian Countries and Germany.

    These (betrothed, or other) had a chance to learn how
    to adapt their early learning, to the US custom.

    That they had many a girl who was looking for a beau,
    was maybe the basis for their motto:

    "The way to a man's heart..."

    Anyway, the recipes are solid and reliable, but remember
    they were tested on cast iron stoves.

    Alex, growing nostalgic.

  4. #4
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    On Aug 4, 2:51*pm, Chemiker <prussianblu...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >
    > This is intriguing. My Mom swore by the the SCB, which she
    > grew up with, but she was a Hungarian Catholic (Byzantine
    > Rite). I have a replica of the 1903 version. Somewhere, in
    > storage, I have Mom's, with its paper sack bookcover. It dates
    > from the '30's.
    >
    > FWIW: There are no pork recipes in my early edition.


    There are in the edition that's on line at Feeding America.
    >
    > [snip unanswerable questions]


    > Anyway, the recipes are solid and reliable, but remember
    > they were tested on cast iron stoves.
    >

    Well, reliable in the sense that they are safe to follow. Nowadays
    few would want to boil vegetables for as long as they did then. -
    aem

  5. #5
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    BeartoothGiG wrote:
    > It must have been well-known in its time : I've seen a Nineteenth
    > Edition. But there is nothing to indicate what settlement they mean,
    > other than the fact that some other names mentioned seem to belong in
    > Southern Wisconsin ...
    >
    > Anybody know anything??



    No, but it reminded me of this: (which always give me a chuckle)

    http://books.google.com/books?id=LT6...sec=frontcover


    Bob

  6. #6
    Chemiker Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    On Tue, 4 Aug 2009 16:12:23 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Well, reliable in the sense that they are safe to follow. Nowadays
    >few would want to boil vegetables for as long as they did then. -
    >aem


    True, true! But it didn't kill you!!!

    And, if you had no teeth, maybe this was
    how they did it.... Hm?

    Alex

  7. #7
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    "BeartoothGiG" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > It must have been well-known in its time : I've seen a Nineteenth
    > Edition. But there is nothing to indicate what settlement they mean,
    > other than the fact that some other names mentioned seem to belong in
    > Southern Wisconsin ...
    >
    > Anybody know anything??
    > --
    > Beartooth Staffwright, Neo-Redneck Not Quite Clueless Power User
    > I have precious (very precious!) little idea where up is.



    I have the 'New Settlement Cookbook' which is a reproduction, printed in
    1991. I never paid attention to whether or nor there were pork recipes in
    it. I believe it was given to me as a gift. I've never prepared any recipe
    from it but it was an interesting read, IIRC. Sometimes I simply enjoy
    reading cookbooks; I don't have to cook from every single cookbook I own.

    Jill


  8. #8
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Settlement Cookbook??

    jmcquown wrote:
    > "BeartoothGiG" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> It must have been well-known in its time : I've seen a Nineteenth
    >> Edition. But there is nothing to indicate what settlement they mean,
    >> other than the fact that some other names mentioned seem to belong in
    >> Southern Wisconsin ...
    >>
    >> Anybody know anything??
    >> --
    >> Beartooth Staffwright, Neo-Redneck Not Quite Clueless Power User
    >> I have precious (very precious!) little idea where up is.

    >
    >
    > I have the 'New Settlement Cookbook' which is a reproduction, printed in
    > 1991. I never paid attention to whether or nor there were pork recipes
    > in it. I believe it was given to me as a gift. I've never prepared any
    > recipe from it but it was an interesting read, IIRC. Sometimes I simply
    > enjoy reading cookbooks; I don't have to cook from every single cookbook
    > I own.
    >
    > Jill


    I have the third edition published in 1976. It has pork recipes.

    The settlement was a settlement house in Milwaukee, WI. Here's what
    Wikipedia says about settlement houses. http://xrl.in/2ufy

    The cookbook incorporates traditional recipes from the homelands of the
    attendees at the classes at the settlement house.

    It is one of my favorite cookbooks.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

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