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Thread: separation of honey

  1. #1
    john hamilton Guest

    Default separation of honey

    Have just been given some honey that is still in the wax comb.

    I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the bottom (or the top?)

    Is this the way to best go about it? Any tips I might want to know about?
    Thanks.



  2. #2
    atec77 Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 2/11/2010 12:29 AM, john hamilton wrote:
    > Have just been given some honey that is still in the wax comb.
    >
    > I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    > heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the bottom (or the top?)
    >
    > Is this the way to best go about it? Any tips I might want to know about?
    > Thanks.
    >
    >

    let it sit in the sun to warm then out of the sun the wax will settle some


    --
    X-No-Archive: Yes


  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:

    > I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    > heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    > bottom (or the top?)


    I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain it.
    How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb? I don't know but I'm sure
    the information could be googled.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  4. #4
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 10:56:15 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    >
    >> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    >> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    >> bottom (or the top?)

    >
    >I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain it.
    >How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb?


    'Extraction' is the term they use. Centrifugal force is how the only
    extractor I ever saw worked. Slice off the caps- and spin until you
    had pure honey dripping down the sides to a catch basin-- and clean
    wax in the center.

    searching for 'honey extraction' ought to get you some ideas and
    warnings about other methods.

    Jim

  5. #5
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    The Cook <[email protected]> wrote:
    -snip-
    >
    >BTW you can chew the wax to get some honey out. Remember the wax
    >candies that you chewed to get the sweet stuff out of. Or am I the
    >only one who went to the Saturday afternoon double feature movies?


    Well, I'm not old enough to remember those.<BG> But I enjoy eating
    the honey, comb and all. Peanut butter and honey sandwiches with the
    comb on last forever.

    Jim
    [that would be crunchy peanut butter on whole oat bread, BTW]

  6. #6
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 11:31:41 -0500, The Cook wrote:

    > BTW you can chew the wax to get some honey out. Remember the wax
    > candies that you chewed to get the sweet stuff out of. Or am I the
    > only one who went to the Saturday afternoon double feature movies?
    > --
    > Susan N.


    i remember nik-l-nips

    <http://www.amazon.com/Nik-L-Nip-Wax-Bottles-Candy-Oz/dp/B000I0CLK4>

    ....but they sound a little different.

    your pal,
    blake

  7. #7
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 10:56:15 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    >
    >> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    >> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    >> bottom (or the top?)

    >
    >I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain it.
    >How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb? I don't know but I'm sure
    >the information could be googled.


    Centrifugul force. Comb honey will eventually separate via gravity.
    Some folks eat the wax.

  8. #8
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 10:56:15 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    >
    >> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    >> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    >> bottom (or the top?)

    >
    >I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain it.
    >How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb?


    Extractor, which is just a centrifuge.

    The process is to slice the seals off of the cells, put the rest of
    the comb into an extractor and crank. I imagine that today's bee
    keepers have electric extractors, but many years ago when I got to
    help my aunts, it was powered by any arms that could be coerced into
    working.

    I have been so lucky this year. My next door neighbor came over with
    a quart of sourwood honey (my absolute favorite) and the air
    conditioning repair man gave us a quart of another honey, probably a
    mixture of whatever bloomed this year.

    BTW you can chew the wax to get some honey out. Remember the wax
    candies that you chewed to get the sweet stuff out of. Or am I the
    only one who went to the Saturday afternoon double feature movies?
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 01/11/2010 10:29 AM, john hamilton wrote:
    > Have just been given some honey that is still in the wax comb.
    >
    > I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    > heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the bottom (or the top?)
    >
    > Is this the way to best go about it? Any tips I might want to know about?
    > Thanks




    Why do you want to separate the honey from the wax. The wax is quite
    edible and adds a wonderful texture. I occasionally treat myself to a
    chunk of comb honey and pay a premium price for it.

  10. #10
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 01/11/2010 10:56 AM, James Silverton wrote:
    > john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    >
    >> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    >> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    >> bottom (or the top?)

    >
    > I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain it.
    > How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb? I don't know but I'm sure
    > the information could be googled.
    >

    They put big chunks of it in a centrifuge and spin it out.

  11. #11
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    James Silverton wrote:
    > john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    >
    >> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    >> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    >> bottom (or the top?)

    >
    > I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain it.
    > How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb? I don't know but I'm sure
    > the information could be googled.
    >



    They cut across the comb with a hot knife to open up the cells, then
    put it through an "extractor" which spins the honey out with centrifugal
    force.

    If I were John, I'd cut across the comb to open the cells, then hang the
    comb open side down in a bowl to let the honey flow out by gravity.
    Warming it slightly (not enough to melt the wax) would speed the flow.
    If wax does get mixed in, straining would work.

    gloria p

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000, "john hamilton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Have just been given some honey that is still in the wax comb.
    >
    > I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    > heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the bottom (or the top?)
    >
    > Is this the way to best go about it? Any tips I might want to know about?
    > Thanks.
    >

    Why would you want to do that? Do you know how expensive comb honey
    is??? Eat it the way it came or give it as Christmas gifts and see how
    happy you make the recipients. Buy the cheap stuff when you want to
    cook with liquid honey.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 01/11/2010 5:46 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    > James Silverton wrote:
    >> john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    >>
    >>> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    >>> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    >>> bottom (or the top?)

    >>
    >> I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain
    >> it. How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb? I don't know but
    >> I'm sure the information could be googled.
    >>

    >
    >
    > They cut across the comb with a hot knife to open up the cells, then
    > put it through an "extractor" which spins the honey out with centrifugal
    > force.
    >
    > If I were John, I'd cut across the comb to open the cells, then hang the
    > comb open side down in a bowl to let the honey flow out by gravity.
    > Warming it slightly (not enough to melt the wax) would speed the flow.
    > If wax does get mixed in, straining would work.



    Come on. The OP was gifted with comb honey and doesn't know what to do
    with it. It seems obvious that he has never had it before and doesn't
    realize what a treat it is. Given a choice between a jar of honey and
    comb, I would take the comb. No doubt about it. The only reason that I
    don't buy comb honey all the time is that it costs about 10 times are
    much as liquid.

  14. #14
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 01/11/2010 6:12 PM, sf wrote:

    > Why would you want to do that? Do you know how expensive comb honey
    > is??? Eat it the way it came or give it as Christmas gifts and see how
    > happy you make the recipients. Buy the cheap stuff when you want to
    > cook with liquid honey.



    We took a big chunk or comb honey to some good friends as a host/hostess
    gift when we spent the weekend at their cottage. Big mistake. They were
    foodies. He is my wine guru, and she was always trying wonderful new
    recipes on us. it just never occurred to me that they would not like
    honey and think that comb honey was about the most disgusting thing
    imaginable. I love comb honey. I get my comb honey at my local drug
    store/ holistic products store. He has the best prices around for honey,
    A pound and a half of local honey is $4.59, compared to $6.95 for stores
    charge for local honey. A 3 inch square piece of comb honey is $6.

  15. #15
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    Dave Smith wrote:

    >
    > We took a big chunk or comb honey to some good friends as a host/hostess
    > gift when we spent the weekend at their cottage. Big mistake. They were
    > foodies. He is my wine guru, and she was always trying wonderful new
    > recipes on us. it just never occurred to me that they would not like
    > honey and think that comb honey was about the most disgusting thing
    > imaginable.




    Isn't it strange how people over-react to perfectly normal things?
    Honeycomb is a really natural thing, and honey has been used for
    centuries. I'm not crazy about the flavor of many honeys, but I would
    never call it disgusting. Your friends are nuts.

    gloria p

  16. #16
    sf Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 18:47:53 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > A 3 inch square piece of comb honey is $6.


    I hear ya! That stuff is *expensive*.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  17. #17
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    In article <BgHzo.18707$[email protected]> ,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 01/11/2010 5:46 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    > > James Silverton wrote:
    > >> john wrote on Mon, 1 Nov 2010 14:29:05 -0000:
    > >>
    > >>> I would like to separate the honey from the wax. I'm thinking of just
    > >>> heating it all and hoping the wax will settle on the
    > >>> bottom (or the top?)
    > >>
    > >> I'd think you could warm up the mixture to say 120F and then strain
    > >> it. How do bee-keepers remove honey from the comb? I don't know but
    > >> I'm sure the information could be googled.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > > They cut across the comb with a hot knife to open up the cells, then
    > > put it through an "extractor" which spins the honey out with centrifugal
    > > force.
    > >
    > > If I were John, I'd cut across the comb to open the cells, then hang the
    > > comb open side down in a bowl to let the honey flow out by gravity.
    > > Warming it slightly (not enough to melt the wax) would speed the flow.
    > > If wax does get mixed in, straining would work.

    >
    >
    > Come on. The OP was gifted with comb honey and doesn't know what to do
    > with it. It seems obvious that he has never had it before and doesn't
    > realize what a treat it is. Given a choice between a jar of honey and
    > comb, I would take the comb. No doubt about it. The only reason that I
    > don't buy comb honey all the time is that it costs about 10 times are
    > much as liquid.


    I'm fortunate to have a source for comb honey at only $10/kg (call it
    $5/pound). It really is the best thing out there.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 17:03:02 -0600, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > We took a big chunk or comb honey to some good friends as a host/hostess
    > > gift when we spent the weekend at their cottage. Big mistake. They were
    > > foodies. He is my wine guru, and she was always trying wonderful new
    > > recipes on us. it just never occurred to me that they would not like
    > > honey and think that comb honey was about the most disgusting thing
    > > imaginable.

    >
    >
    >
    > Isn't it strange how people over-react to perfectly normal things?
    > Honeycomb is a really natural thing, and honey has been used for
    > centuries. I'm not crazy about the flavor of many honeys, but I would
    > never call it disgusting. Your friends are nuts.
    >

    Dave has a lot of "colorful characters" in his life and that's why he
    has so many good stories to tell us.

    You're right about those honey flavors. I bought a "spring mix" from
    the farmer's market that I can only take in small doses.


    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  19. #19
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 01/11/2010 7:03 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> We took a big chunk or comb honey to some good friends as a
    >> host/hostess gift when we spent the weekend at their cottage. Big
    >> mistake. They were foodies. He is my wine guru, and she was always
    >> trying wonderful new recipes on us. it just never occurred to me that
    >> they would not like honey and think that comb honey was about the most
    >> disgusting thing imaginable.

    >
    >
    >
    > Isn't it strange how people over-react to perfectly normal things?
    > Honeycomb is a really natural thing, and honey has been used for
    > centuries. I'm not crazy about the flavor of many honeys, but I would
    > never call it disgusting. Your friends are nuts.



    I was surprised by their reaction. I love honey and can't imagine
    people not liking it, not a whole family.

  20. #20
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: separation of honey

    On 01/11/2010 7:06 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Mon, 01 Nov 2010 18:47:53 -0400, Dave Smith
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> A 3 inch square piece of comb honey is $6.

    >
    > I hear ya! That stuff is *expensive*.
    >

    Yep. It's a damned waste to get a chunk of expensive comb honey and to
    throw away all that good stuff. It is a real treat.

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