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Thread: Sense of Taste

  1. #1
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Sense of Taste

    I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing her
    sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes, which
    concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her to
    lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.

    I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do, I
    really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I would
    be grateful if you would share your experiences.
    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste


    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ki1bv2$5oo$[email protected]..
    >I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    >advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    >more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes, which
    >concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    >process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her to
    >lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.
    >
    > I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do, I
    > really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    > would be grateful if you would share your experiences.
    > --
    > --
    > http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


    My parents are doing the same.

    We moved here when I was 7 and had few relatives here so my parents adopted
    a grandma for us. She would eat very little other than lime Jell-O. The
    minister of our church (where my parents found her) had us take food to her
    regularly because she wasn't eating. He said for us to try to get her to
    eat a bite of everything. But that was super hard to do. She died not long
    after. The minister also said that most elderly people seem to prefer
    sweets. And I think this is true.

    Not sure what the problem is in my dad's case. He did have some brain
    bleeds and the problems began after that. He seemed to lose quite a good
    deal of his memory. There is some kind of dementia also but my mom either
    doesn't know or isn't being straight with us on that. He is 82 now. Not
    only did he forget what foods were, but he forgot how to eat them. Now this
    is a man who was nearly constantly eating! Suddenly not only did he not
    want to eat anything but he was convinced that he disliked all foods.

    While he was in the hospital, my mom ordered his meals for him. They had a
    raw veggie plate that came with Ranch dressing. He dipped the veggies in
    the dressing. And this was very odd for him. We always had raw veggies at
    celebration type meals and often even just at dinner. He never dipped his
    veggies into anything! We just never had dip like that. But suddenly he
    was dipping because my mom told him to. So all of a sudden, he thought all
    of his food should be dipped. He picked up the dinner roll, dipped it in
    the dressing, made a face, then put it down. Said that it was terrible. We
    all tried to talk him out of it. Told him that it would be better to put
    butter on the roll. But he wouldn't listen.

    Then when he got home, he dipped a grilled cheese sandwich in applesauce.
    But then later, something else bad happened and he seemed to temporarily
    forget how to eat. This was the day that I eventually dialed 911, thinking
    he'd had a stroke. I brought him his favorite burrito from the place where
    we had lunch each week. Not only did he not know what it was, but he didn't
    know how to eat it. Didn't know to cut it. Couldn't cut it after I
    explained how. So I cut it for him and he then tried to eat it with a
    spoon. He made a huge mess!

    Since then, things have gotten some better. But he is losing weight
    rapidly. He is now in an adult home. The portions they give out are tiny.
    His are always twice the size of everyone else's but they're still tiny.
    Like the amount that you'd give a toddler. They use those little plastic
    plates too. They do offer seconds but people rarely take them. It's as
    though he has lost all sense of appetite. He never seems to be hungry any
    more. This was a man who was constantly hungry! We've even brought him
    some of what used to be his favorite snacks. He was a big time snacker.
    And now mostly he won't eat the snacks. Once in a while he will, but
    rarely.

    We did take him a large Chinese dinner one night. One of those combo things
    with the soup, eggrolls, pork with ketchup, hot mustard and sesame seeds.
    Rice and some kind of main dish. Can't remember what that was, but there
    was shrimp in it. He did eat that and said it was good. But he didn't
    finish it all. Granted it was a huge amount of food! Other times we bring
    him something that used to be his favorite food but he just says it's okay.
    The only think I can really remember him commenting on that was good was the
    marble rye they had at the rehab place. They had it for a while and then
    they switched to something else. He was upset. He did like that!

    My mom's eating has also changed. We are having a hard time getting her to
    eat healthy food. She always wants to go out to eat but she has things like
    milkshakes, waffles, pancakes, crepes, muffins, sweet rolls, etc. If we go
    for Mexican, it's usually nachos with extra cheese. She did have a Chef's
    salad once which is unusual for her. I've never seen her order one of those
    before. But there too, she seems not to remember what foods she likes. And
    this has been going on for a long time with her. For instance, once she had
    fish tacos. She said they were not good and never to let her order them
    again. Then the following week, she said she was going to have the fish
    tacos. When I told her that she didn't like them and said not to let her
    order them again, she accused me of lying. Ordered them anyway. Said they
    were fine. Then the next time she asked me if she liked the fish tacos in
    there? It's like... There's no safe answer I can give her. It's like that
    movie, Groundhog Day. Each day we start over again. New. Seemingly no
    memory of anything that happened in the past. Or the near past anyway.

    And then there was the Christmas popcorn. I don't know if you get these
    things where you are, but here, many stores put out popcorn tins at
    Christmas. They are big to huge decorated tins (usually a seasonal pattern)
    filled with popcorn. The cheap ones usually have cardboard separators in
    them. One section has plain or buttered popcorn, one has cheese popcorn and
    the other has caramel corn. Horrid stuff, IMO. Always stale tasting. I
    love popcorn. But I love fresh popcorn. Even for caramel corn. Has to be
    fresh. Like almost hot from the oven fresh. Otherwise I don't like it.
    But she loves it! So we bought her a tin.

    My brother one upped me and went to Popcornopolis. I have never tried their
    corn but I have heard that it is good. I have given it as gifts. They make
    all sorts of flavors, many of them sweet. So he got her three giant tins,
    each filled with a single flavor. But I believe they were the same flavors
    as in our tins.

    For weeks, all she would eat was that popcorn. For breakfast, lunch and
    dinner. Not that she ate three meals a day. She was frequently skipping
    meals. Complaining of extreme hunger but refusing any food that I gave her.

    She also found food in my van and began ripping into it. Tic Tacs and
    Altoids. Corn Nuts. Wolfing them down like she'd never seen them before.
    And in fact she claimed never to have seen the Altoids before. But I know
    that my dad used to buy them so she has seen them.

    In her case, for sure there is something going on for sweets. And for some
    odd reason, nachos with extra cheese. If she doesn't order those it is a
    quesadilla with extra cheese. If she eats Italian food, she orders some
    sort of cheese filled pasta. She scrapes the pasta off and just eats the
    cheese. Basically at all meals she eats pretty much nothing except perhaps
    for whatever cheese is on the meal. Then as soon as she gets out of there
    or gets to home, she begins eating sweets and junk food. It's maddening to
    me. But she is very much a control freak. Won't listen to me at all. So
    there is nothing I can do.

    OTOH, I had an elderly neighbor who was a stickler for proper eating.
    Sometimes she would invite me over for a meal because she thought I wasn't
    eating properly. This wasn't true. But in those days I did dine out a lot
    and didn't really keep much food in the house. I think she feared that I
    wasn't eating much at all. I did make my own granola bars. Her recipe.
    And occasionally I'd make pasta for myself. Once a week I'd go to the
    grocery store and get a big salad from the salad bar. So big that it would
    take me two days to eat it. And I might have a can or two of soup in the
    cupboard just in case. I did have braces on my teeth in those days so I
    couldn't eat popcorn. So I guess if she was judging by what she saw of mine
    in the trash, it might have looked to her like I wasn't eating much. I was
    just eating my lunch and dinner out, most of the time and I didn't usually
    get home until very late. Sometimes like 2:00 a.m. or later.

    Anyway... This woman didn't eat overly large meals but they were always
    proper meals. I did her shopping for her after they took her license away
    and she was no longer able to drive. She'd have a small piece of meat or
    fish, or maybe an egg and a couple of vegetables for dinner. She seemed to
    be of a good weight. Not thin but certainly not fat. But not long after
    that I didn't see her often. Long story that I won't get into here but she
    had to move out. Her daughter built her a tiny apartment in the basement of
    her house. It did have a tiny kitchenette, tiny sitting room with a couple
    of chairs and a very small bedroom and bathroom. She did invite me over
    once and put out snacks. But her daughter took over the cooking for her. I
    really only saw her that one time because my life had gotten hectically busy
    and the house where her daughter lived was pretty far away.

    My one grandma had weird food issues in her late 70's. For her I think a
    lot of it had to do with fear. She was afraid to go out and get food. She
    loved to go out to eat but when she tried to do this once she fell and broke
    her hip. Then she began to fear going to the store. Thought people might
    rob her. She wrote me lots of letters. Told me that she loved canned
    chili. So my brother and I took turns buying cases of Hormel chili. The
    little single serve cans. Someone had bought her a microwave and she loved
    it. So we knew at least that she had the chili to eat. But... She was
    living in KS and we were in WA. We don't know what all she was eating at
    other times. We did try to send her lots of food items whenever we could.
    But of course the price of postage was high. Not long after that she went
    into a nursing home and she did start losing weight. So there may well have
    been other food issues.

    I have been reading a lot of books on senility. Those say that things
    happen in the body other than just memory problems. All of their senses can
    change. Sort of warp. Their seeing can go funny on them. They don't see
    colors so well. So foods might not look appealing any more. Or they might
    see things that are not even there. Things that are not frightening can
    look frightening to them and they might not be able to even explain it to
    you.

    Textures can frighten them. Because their sense of touch can go funny.

    Their hearing can diminish or they might hear things in what seems to them a
    magnified way. So a food that is crunchy might frighten them. My dad gets
    very frightened of certain noises. No food noises that I know of but sirens
    or ladies heels clicking on the wooden floor upset him.

    Their sense of smell can go. It can be diminished or they can smell things
    that aren't even there. The mind can play tricks on them. They might think
    that the food smells burned even when it isn't. And of course when you
    can't smell something, you can't really taste it.

    Then of course there is the sense of taste. Which I have also read they can
    sometimes prefer sweet foods.

    One of the books said that it is best to offer seniors finger foods. They
    often can not manage silverware very well. But aim for things that are high
    in nutrition. The mentioned chicken nuggets, cheese cubes, cut up fruit.
    They said never to offer fruit with peel on like oranges because they might
    get confused and try to eat the peel. But the book also said that soup was
    a good choice. I know that they do serve soup often where my dad is.
    Tomato soup a lot! Maybe because it is easy for them to pick up.

    The book did say to offer small portions and refill their plate as needed.
    Just like toddlers, they can get overwhelmed with large portions of foods.
    It also said to leave out foods that they could pick up and eat. For my
    MIL, we often left out a dish of pretzels. She loves those.



  3. #3
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ki1i3r$f3$[email protected]..
    > The book did say to offer small portions and refill their plate as needed.
    > Just like toddlers, they can get overwhelmed with large portions of foods.
    > It also said to leave out foods that they could pick up and eat. For my
    > MIL, we often left out a dish of pretzels. She loves those.


    Thank you for all the time and trouble you put into that post. I am very
    grateful.

    My relative isn't really refusing food, she simply doesn't enjoy it and
    isn't tempted much. She still eats but the lack of enjoyment is sad. She
    used to really enjoy her meals and had favourite foods which she now
    dislikes. I hope she doesn't get into the problems you have found with
    various people
    She still cooks every day for herself and her husband so she isn't starving
    at all, it's just this lack of enjoyment that concerns me in case she does
    stop eating as much as she needs. I suppose the thing that concerns me
    most, is the way she dislikes foods that were previous favourites.
    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  4. #4
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste


    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ki1bv2$5oo$[email protected]..
    >I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    >advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    >more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes, which
    >concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    >process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her to
    >lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.


    Normal. Don't fight it. Why make a problem where there is no problem? If
    she dislikes food she used to love, so what? To be frank, yes, it is part
    of the dying process. I have seen it a few times very close and personal.
    They always loose their interest in food and often choose one or two things
    they will eat and nothing else. The dying process can be quite brief or
    very protracted.

    > I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do, I
    > really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    > would be grateful if you would share your experiences.


    Ask her what she wants. Then give it to her. If she wants oysters and
    chocolate sauce then give it to her.




  5. #5
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ki1l37$e1t$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:ki1bv2$5oo$[email protected]..
    >>I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    >>advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >>her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for
    >>any more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,
    >>which concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the
    >>aging process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see
    >>her to lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.

    >
    > Normal. Don't fight it. Why make a problem where there is no problem?
    > If she dislikes food she used to love, so what? To be frank, yes, it is
    > part of the dying process. I have seen it a few times very close and
    > personal. They always loose their interest in food and often choose one or
    > two things they will eat and nothing else. The dying process can be quite
    > brief or very protracted.
    >
    >> I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do, I
    >> really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    >> would be grateful if you would share your experiences.

    >
    > Ask her what she wants. Then give it to her. If she wants oysters and
    > chocolate sauce then give it to her.


    Oh dear .. thanks!

    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  6. #6
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:ki1bv2$5oo$[email protected]..
    >I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    >advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    >more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes, which
    >concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    >process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her to
    >lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.
    >
    > I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do, I
    > really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    > would be grateful if you would share your experiences.
    > --
    > --
    > http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/




    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/bo...-age.html?_r=0

    Cheri


  7. #7
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "Cheri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:ki1bv2$5oo$[email protected]..
    >>I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    >>advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >>her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for
    >>any more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,
    >>which concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the
    >>aging process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see
    >>her to lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.
    >>
    >> I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do, I
    >> really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    >> would be grateful if you would share your experiences.
    >> --
    >> --
    >> http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

    >
    >
    >
    > http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/bo...-age.html?_r=0


    Thanks, Cheri! I guess I need to stop worrying about her .. unless she
    gets orange fingertips <g>


    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  8. #8
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    In article <ki1l37$e1t$[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:ki1bv2$5oo$[email protected]..
    > >I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    > >advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    > >her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    > >more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,


    They are symptoms of irreversible age-related mental impairments
    including alzheimers and dementia. Along with memory gaps, obsessions,
    aggression and paranoid delusions.

    Janet

  9. #9
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    Ophelia wrote:
    >
    > I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    > advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing her
    > sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    > more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes, which
    > concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    > process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her to
    > lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.


    I think losing taste comes with the old age. It's losing appetite is when
    you have to start worrying. I've noticed that with old animals and people,
    they seem to just slow way down on the eating as they are headed towards
    death. You can force feed them but it's just stalling for time. I guess
    nature just naturally makes you lose your appetite when the end is
    coming...perhaps to speed it up?

    G.

  10. #10
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "Gary" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > Ophelia wrote:
    >>
    >> I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you can
    >> advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >> her
    >> sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    >> more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,
    >> which
    >> concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    >> process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her
    >> to
    >> lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.

    >
    > I think losing taste comes with the old age. It's losing appetite is when
    > you have to start worrying. I've noticed that with old animals and
    > people,
    > they seem to just slow way down on the eating as they are headed towards
    > death. You can force feed them but it's just stalling for time. I guess
    > nature just naturally makes you lose your appetite when the end is
    > coming...perhaps to speed it up?


    Something to think about. She is very active and I just wondered if it
    could be a medical thing is all. I am persuaded it is a natural
    progression, so thank you
    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    On Sat, 16 Mar 2013 11:38:47 -0500, Gary <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I think losing taste comes with the old age. It's losing appetite is when
    > you have to start worrying. I've noticed that with old animals and people,
    > they seem to just slow way down on the eating as they are headed towards
    > death. You can force feed them but it's just stalling for time. I guess
    > nature just naturally makes you lose your appetite when the end is
    > coming...perhaps to speed it up?
    >

    That's what my mother did and her mother did it too. They just
    stopped eating/drinking and it was all over in 7-10 days. I'll
    probably do it that way too.


    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  12. #12
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    On 3/16/13 10:32 AM, Janet wrote:

    > They are symptoms of irreversible age-related mental impairments
    > including alzheimers and dementia. Along with memory gaps, obsessions,
    > aggression and paranoid delusions.


    And an affinity for daytime television.

    -- Larry


  13. #13
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    On 3/16/2013 3:55 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    > I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you
    > can advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be
    > losing/changing her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she
    > doesn't care much for any more, but some things she used to really love
    > she actively dislikes, which concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick
    > or is this part of the aging process and if so, how do you deal with
    > it? I wouldn't want to see her to lose weight because she isn't exactly
    > overweight now.
    >
    > I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do,
    > I really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    > would be grateful if you would share your experiences.


    Certain medications can alter the sense of taste. Age, as others have
    noted, also can be a factor.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  14. #14
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    On 16/03/2013 1:51 PM, pltrgyst wrote:
    > On 3/16/13 10:32 AM, Janet wrote:
    >
    >> They are symptoms of irreversible age-related mental impairments
    >> including alzheimers and dementia. Along with memory gaps, obsessions,
    >> aggression and paranoid delusions.

    >
    > And an affinity for daytime television.
    >
    >


    I don't know how they can survive. I made a deal with myself when I took
    an early retirement that if I ever found myself sitting around watching
    Jerry Springer I had to go out and get a job. It will be 9 years in
    June. No Springer. I sometimes sit down and watch the news, and if it
    is a really crappy day I might watch a movie on TV. There is nothing
    worth watching.



  15. #15
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "Janet Wilder" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:5144b4b0$0$17023$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    > On 3/16/2013 3:55 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >> I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you
    >> can advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be
    >> losing/changing her sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she
    >> doesn't care much for any more, but some things she used to really love
    >> she actively dislikes, which concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick
    >> or is this part of the aging process and if so, how do you deal with
    >> it? I wouldn't want to see her to lose weight because she isn't exactly
    >> overweight now.
    >>
    >> I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do,
    >> I really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    >> would be grateful if you would share your experiences.

    >
    > Certain medications can alter the sense of taste. Age, as others have
    > noted, also can be a factor.


    I thought it was possibly because of a medical problem, never thought of
    medication. Of course she is no spring chicken either

    Thanks, for your input
    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/


  16. #16
    bigwheel Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste


    'Ophelia[_9_ Wrote:
    > ;1821604']I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am
    > hoping you can
    > advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    > her
    > sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    >
    > more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,
    > which
    > concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    >
    > process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her
    > to
    > lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.
    >
    > I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do,
    > I
    > really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    > would
    > be grateful if you would share your experiences.
    > --
    > --
    > 'Help for Heroes' (http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/)


    Think your diagnosis is on the money. Our daughter works as a hospice
    care nurse and she deals mostly with seasoned citizens. She say..all
    their taste buds go..but sweet goes last. That is while most of us old
    codgers like sweet stuff..lol. Prayers said for your elderly kin folk.




    --
    bigwheel

  17. #17
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste

    I think as elders lose control of their environment they get "lulled"
    into just accepting things as they are.

    Dad no longer gets up from the table to get various items like Miracle
    Whip, horseradish, mustard, chili powder,
    salt/pepper etc. Mom has always liked foods to be bland so she never
    thinks of them.

    But if we visit, and we bring those items to the table, Dad will then
    reach for them.

    I do notice loss of taste with Mom-she gave my brother and I frozen
    batches of chili one year. It was awful-something was really off. She
    also forgets to add an ingredient once in awhile to recipes she has made
    for years.

    Not every dementia pt has Alzheimers-its like a scale from slow
    connections to missing connections to possibly newly formed cross
    connections.


  18. #18
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "bigwheel" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > 'Ophelia[_9_ Wrote:
    >> ;1821604']I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am
    >> hoping you can
    >> advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be losing/changing
    >> her
    >> sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for any
    >>
    >> more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,
    >> which
    >> concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the aging
    >>
    >> process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see her
    >> to
    >> lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.
    >>
    >> I can't see her regularly because she lives too far away, so when I do,
    >> I
    >> really need it to count. If I could enthuse her it might help too. I
    >> would
    >> be grateful if you would share your experiences.
    >> --
    >> --
    >> 'Help for Heroes' (http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/)

    >
    > Think your diagnosis is on the money. Our daughter works as a hospice
    > care nurse and she deals mostly with seasoned citizens. She say..all
    > their taste buds go..but sweet goes last. That is while most of us old
    > codgers like sweet stuff..lol. Prayers said for your elderly kin folk.


    Thank you.

    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  19. #19
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste



    "z z" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I think as elders lose control of their environment they get "lulled"
    > into just accepting things as they are.
    >
    > Dad no longer gets up from the table to get various items like Miracle
    > Whip, horseradish, mustard, chili powder,
    > salt/pepper etc. Mom has always liked foods to be bland so she never
    > thinks of them.
    >
    > But if we visit, and we bring those items to the table, Dad will then
    > reach for them.
    >
    > I do notice loss of taste with Mom-she gave my brother and I frozen
    > batches of chili one year. It was awful-something was really off. She
    > also forgets to add an ingredient once in awhile to recipes she has made
    > for years.
    >
    > Not every dementia pt has Alzheimers-its like a scale from slow
    > connections to missing connections to possibly newly formed cross
    > connections.


    Old age ain't for wimps, eh?

    --
    --
    http://www.helpforheroes.org.uk/shop/

  20. #20
    l not -l Guest

    Default Re: Sense of Taste


    On 16-Mar-2013, "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I know some of you are caring for older relatives, so I am hoping you
    > can
    > advise. I have a relative - early 70s who seems to be
    > losing/changing her
    > sense of taste. Things she used to enjoy she doesn't care much for
    > any
    > more, but some things she used to really love she actively dislikes,
    > which
    > concerns me somewhat. Is she getting sick or is this part of the
    > aging
    > process and if so, how do you deal with it? I wouldn't want to see
    > her to
    > lose weight because she isn't exactly overweight now.

    Sometime when you are in the supermarket take note of what you see in
    carts of the elderly; a high percentage will be sweet. I have read that
    as we age the ability to taste dulls, with sweet being the one that is
    least diminished.
    --

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

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