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Thread: Sending care packages-ideas please

  1. #1
    Nexis Guest

    Default Sending care packages-ideas please

    Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word from my
    cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had emphysema,
    his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any possible
    measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving
    person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off
    his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.

    Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I simply cannot
    afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some things
    that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other than I'd
    like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worry about. I
    don't know what else to do.

    Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.

    kimberly


  2. #2
    Stanley Horwitz Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    In article <0Qp0k.1175$[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    > Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word
    > from my
    > cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had
    > emphysema,
    > his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any
    > possible
    > measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most
    > loving
    > person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to
    > turn off
    > his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    > Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I
    > simply cannot
    > afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some
    > things
    > that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other
    > than I'd
    > like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worry
    > about. I
    > don't know what else to do.
    >
    > Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.


    Call a local grocery store in your aunt's area and explain the situation
    and see if they can take an order on the phone and deliver it to her. At
    this time of need, your aunt probably won't have time to cook, so maybe
    she could use some pre-made meals such as a roasted chicken, meat loaf,
    and such, especially if she's going to have company over.

  3. #3
    Stanley Horwitz Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    In article <0Qp0k.1175$[email protected]>, "Nexis" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    > Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word
    > from my
    > cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had
    > emphysema,
    > his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any
    > possible
    > measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most
    > loving
    > person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to
    > turn off
    > his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    > Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I
    > simply cannot
    > afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some
    > things
    > that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other
    > than I'd
    > like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worry
    > about. I
    > don't know what else to do.
    >
    > Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.


    Call a local grocery store in your aunt's area and explain the situation
    and see if they can take an order on the phone and deliver it to her. At
    this time of need, your aunt probably won't have time to cook, so maybe
    she could use some pre-made meals such as a roasted chicken, meat loaf,
    and such, especially if she's going to have company over.

  4. #4
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    On Jun 1, 12:47�am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    > Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word from my
    > cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had emphysema,
    > his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any possible
    > measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving
    > person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off
    > his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    > Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I simply cannot
    > afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some things
    > that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other than I'd
    > like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worryabout. I
    > don't know what else to do.
    >
    > Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.


    Since you can't be there the next best thing is to phone to express
    your concern, and perhaps ask if she needs anything specifically... I
    can't imagine she does unless she needs money (but you would already
    know that). It's highly inappropriate (not to mention insulting) to
    send a premature condolence gift.

    Your request sounds more like you're experiencing personal guilt
    because you're not able to afford to visit... please don't, your
    physical presence may not even be wanted at this time, your presence
    may present more a burden than any assistance you can provide. Since
    you don't live nearby the *only* appropriate act on your part is to
    phone, do not under any circumstances send anything before asking and
    receiving approval. After your uncle passes only then send an
    appropriate condolence gift; flowers, candy, cakes/cookies/fruit/wine
    basket, etc. I'm sorry that you feel frustrated in not being able to
    do more, but since you can't be there to perhaps help with general
    housekeeping (dusting, vacuuming, laundry, dishes, cooking, etc.),
    unless you know them to be in dire financial straights you can ask if
    they need some cash and then send a check... otherwise send nothing.
    Sending a sack of groceries like what's donated for a food drive will
    be construed as unwelcome charity simply to allay your personal
    guilt... that's a cheap shot that's more for you than them... don't do
    that.


  5. #5
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    On Jun 1, 12:47�am, "Nexis" <nex...@cox.net> wrote:
    > Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    > Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word from my
    > cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had emphysema,
    > his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any possible
    > measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving
    > person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off
    > his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    > Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I simply cannot
    > afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some things
    > that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other than I'd
    > like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worryabout. I
    > don't know what else to do.
    >
    > Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.


    Since you can't be there the next best thing is to phone to express
    your concern, and perhaps ask if she needs anything specifically... I
    can't imagine she does unless she needs money (but you would already
    know that). It's highly inappropriate (not to mention insulting) to
    send a premature condolence gift.

    Your request sounds more like you're experiencing personal guilt
    because you're not able to afford to visit... please don't, your
    physical presence may not even be wanted at this time, your presence
    may present more a burden than any assistance you can provide. Since
    you don't live nearby the *only* appropriate act on your part is to
    phone, do not under any circumstances send anything before asking and
    receiving approval. After your uncle passes only then send an
    appropriate condolence gift; flowers, candy, cakes/cookies/fruit/wine
    basket, etc. I'm sorry that you feel frustrated in not being able to
    do more, but since you can't be there to perhaps help with general
    housekeeping (dusting, vacuuming, laundry, dishes, cooking, etc.),
    unless you know them to be in dire financial straights you can ask if
    they need some cash and then send a check... otherwise send nothing.
    Sending a sack of groceries like what's donated for a food drive will
    be construed as unwelcome charity simply to allay your personal
    guilt... that's a cheap shot that's more for you than them... don't do
    that.


  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please


    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:0Qp0k.1175$[email protected]..
    > Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year
    > in Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got
    > word from my cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and
    > because he had emphysema, his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he
    > wasn't a candidate for any possible measures of help. My aunt, who is just
    > about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving person I've ever seen, heard
    > of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off his ventilator,
    > which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    > Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I
    > simply cannot afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support,
    > and send her some things that would be helpful to her right now. I don't
    > know how to explain it other than I'd like to send things that she's going
    > to need, but won't have time to worry about. I don't know what else to do.
    >
    > Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.
    >
    > kimberly


    Unfortunately I don't think I have ever seen a "Guide on Pulling the Plug"

    I would however suggest you sit down and write a note covering 2 specific
    areas. First telling your aunt just how much your visits meant. Secondly how
    you understand and support her decision.

    Over the next few weeks she is going to have to incur expenses for some
    level of memorial service and/or reception which may be a pot-luck
    situation. If so maybe you can contact one of your other family members who
    can purchase for you some contributing element (anything from Brownies to
    cookies to little sandwiches).

    Most importantly just maintain a level of visibility with a phone call,
    sympathy cards, notes of good memories. This is an area that you can not
    fix, all you can really do is be there to support and listen.

    Sorry for your loss,

    Dimitri


  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please


    "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:0Qp0k.1175$[email protected]..
    > Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year
    > in Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got
    > word from my cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and
    > because he had emphysema, his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he
    > wasn't a candidate for any possible measures of help. My aunt, who is just
    > about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving person I've ever seen, heard
    > of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off his ventilator,
    > which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    > Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I
    > simply cannot afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support,
    > and send her some things that would be helpful to her right now. I don't
    > know how to explain it other than I'd like to send things that she's going
    > to need, but won't have time to worry about. I don't know what else to do.
    >
    > Any ideas? They'll all be appreciated.
    >
    > kimberly


    Unfortunately I don't think I have ever seen a "Guide on Pulling the Plug"

    I would however suggest you sit down and write a note covering 2 specific
    areas. First telling your aunt just how much your visits meant. Secondly how
    you understand and support her decision.

    Over the next few weeks she is going to have to incur expenses for some
    level of memorial service and/or reception which may be a pot-luck
    situation. If so maybe you can contact one of your other family members who
    can purchase for you some contributing element (anything from Brownies to
    cookies to little sandwiches).

    Most importantly just maintain a level of visibility with a phone call,
    sympathy cards, notes of good memories. This is an area that you can not
    fix, all you can really do is be there to support and listen.

    Sorry for your loss,

    Dimitri


  8. #8
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    On Sat, 31 May 2008 21:47:43 -0700, "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    >Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word from my
    >cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had emphysema,
    >his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any possible
    >measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving
    >person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off
    >his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    >Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I simply cannot
    >afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some things
    >that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other than I'd
    >like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worry about. I
    >don't know what else to do.


    It's a really hard one... I mean, food gifts are always nice but the
    fact of the matter is that if you're going back and forth to the
    hospital, it's not all that likely that a food basket is even going to
    be touched.

    I spent half the summer last year with my mother in and out of the
    hospital, and she's now been rediagnosed with ovarian cancer... or, at
    any rate, it's reoccurred, and the prognosis is very bad. The thing
    that has been most helpful to all of us, both last year and now, is
    just things like phone calls. There's nothing that my mother needs or
    wants that anyone can give her. So I would be more inclined to phone
    and ask if there is anything that your aunt needs... and just try to
    call frequently... rather than sending anything unless there's
    something that she *does* need.

    That gift of love and time is the thing that's most valuable of all
    and often hardest to know how to give, especially when there's nothing
    that can be fixed or helped. (And I'm so sorry this is happening.)

    Nina


  9. #9
    Nina Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    On Sat, 31 May 2008 21:47:43 -0700, "Nexis" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Many people have heard me talk of my aunt & uncle that I visit every year in
    >Wisconsin, LaVern & Margaret. On our way to my mom's surgery, we got word from my
    >cousin Dee that LaVern had fallen ill with pneumonia, and because he had emphysema,
    >his lungs had just given up. At 88 yrs old, he wasn't a candidate for any possible
    >measures of help. My aunt, who is just about the nicest, sweetest, and most loving
    >person I've ever seen, heard of, or read about, has to make the decision to turn off
    >his ventilator, which is the only thing keeping him alive.
    >
    >Much as I would love to be able to go out there and be there for her, I simply cannot
    >afford to. Still I would like to show my love and support, and send her some things
    >that would be helpful to her right now. I don't know how to explain it other than I'd
    >like to send things that she's going to need, but won't have time to worry about. I
    >don't know what else to do.


    It's a really hard one... I mean, food gifts are always nice but the
    fact of the matter is that if you're going back and forth to the
    hospital, it's not all that likely that a food basket is even going to
    be touched.

    I spent half the summer last year with my mother in and out of the
    hospital, and she's now been rediagnosed with ovarian cancer... or, at
    any rate, it's reoccurred, and the prognosis is very bad. The thing
    that has been most helpful to all of us, both last year and now, is
    just things like phone calls. There's nothing that my mother needs or
    wants that anyone can give her. So I would be more inclined to phone
    and ask if there is anything that your aunt needs... and just try to
    call frequently... rather than sending anything unless there's
    something that she *does* need.

    That gift of love and time is the thing that's most valuable of all
    and often hardest to know how to give, especially when there's nothing
    that can be fixed or helped. (And I'm so sorry this is happening.)

    Nina


  10. #10
    Tara Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    I might send a prepaid long distance phone card and some nice writing
    paper or blank notes and a book of stamps.

    Tara

  11. #11
    Tara Guest

    Default Re: Sending care packages-ideas please

    I might send a prepaid long distance phone card and some nice writing
    paper or blank notes and a book of stamps.

    Tara

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