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Thread: Semolina flour in Australia?

  1. #1
    anthony Guest

    Default Semolina flour in Australia?

    I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.

  2. #2
    Tudor5 Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?

    On Jul 28, 4:05*pm, anthony <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net> wrote:
    > I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    > noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    > I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    > a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    > germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    > packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    > of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    > flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    > Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    > wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.


    See here http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/im...urum_wheat.pdf


  3. #3
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?

    anthony wrote:

    >> See
    >> herewww.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/.../durum_wheat.pdf


    > From here, the link is broken. It took me to the agric.wa site, but
    > that said 'sadly, what you're looking for isn't here'.
    > It did lead me to a site telling potential growers that durum wheat
    > could offer better returns than conventional, but that doesn't really
    > answer my question...


    Look at the 3 dots in that link: it probably got copied & pasted from a
    google page or alike.
    Tudor5 should copy it again paying attention to the google abbreviations
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano




  4. #4
    anthony Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?

    On Jul 28, 6:27*pm, Tudor5 <spamlis...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 28, 4:05*pm, anthony <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net> wrote:
    >
    > > I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    > > noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    > > I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    > > a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    > > germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    > > packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    > > of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    > > flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    > > Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    > > wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.

    >
    > See herewww.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/.../durum_wheat.pdf


    From here, the link is broken. It took me to the agric.wa site, but
    that said 'sadly, what you're looking for isn't here'.
    It did lead me to a site telling potential growers that durum wheat
    could offer better returns than conventional, but that doesn't really
    answer my question...
    Thanks anyway

  5. #5
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?


    "anthony" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Jul 28, 6:27 pm, Tudor5 <spamlis...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 28, 4:05 pm, anthony <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net> wrote:
    >
    > > I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    > > noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    > > I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    > > a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    > > germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    > > packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    > > of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    > > flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    > > Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    > > wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.

    >
    > See herewww.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/.../durum_wheat.pdf


    From here, the link is broken. It took me to the agric.wa site, but
    that said 'sadly, what you're looking for isn't here'.
    It did lead me to a site telling potential growers that durum wheat
    could offer better returns than conventional, but that doesn't really
    answer my question...
    Thanks anyway
    ================

    semolina
    Noun
    the large hard grains of wheat left after flour has been milled, used for
    making puddings and pasta [Italian semolino]

    http://www.thefreedictionary.com/semolina



  6. #6
    Hoges in WA Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?


    "anthony" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    > noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    > I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    > a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    > germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    > packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    > of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    > flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    > Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    > wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.

    =======================================

    What side of the country are you on?
    I have Durum Semolina in my cupboard.


    http://www.allaboutbread.com.au/


    I get mine from a shop in Bunbury.

    Hoges in WA



  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?

    On Tue, 28 Jul 2009 08:31:22 GMT, "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Look at the 3 dots in that link: it probably got copied & pasted from a
    >google page or alike.
    >Tudor5 should copy it again paying attention to the google abbreviations


    and post a tiny link too http://tinyurl.com/

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  8. #8
    Phil..c Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?

    Ophelia wrote:
    > "anthony" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Jul 28, 6:27 pm, Tudor5 <spamlis...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Jul 28, 4:05 pm, anthony <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    >>> noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    >>> I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    >>> a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    >>> germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    >>> packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    >>> of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    >>> flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    >>> Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    >>> wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.

    >> See herewww.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/imported_assets/.../durum_wheat.pdf

    >
    > From here, the link is broken. It took me to the agric.wa site, but
    > that said 'sadly, what you're looking for isn't here'.
    > It did lead me to a site telling potential growers that durum wheat
    > could offer better returns than conventional, but that doesn't really
    > answer my question...
    > Thanks anyway
    > ================
    >
    > semolina
    > Noun
    > the large hard grains of wheat left after flour has been milled, used for
    > making puddings and pasta [Italian semolino]
    >
    > http://www.thefreedictionary.com/semolina
    >
    >


    Probably hobbled by the Intranet

    Try this


    http://www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/im...urum_wheat.pdf

    If that does not work do your own google and type in
    Farm note 80/2004roduction package Durham wheat [wa agric]

  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Semolina flour in Australia?

    anthony wrote:
    >
    > I've tried posting this in rec.food.baking but as some might have
    > noticed, that's the preserve of spammers nowadays.
    > I'm just wondering if anyone here knows whether the word 'semolina' on
    > a packet of flour here guarantees that it's from durum flour wheat
    > germ and not from regular flour. I've looked at the fine print on some
    > packets and it's never specified, which makes me a bit dubious. Some
    > of my recipes for Italian-style bread do specify using some semolina
    > flour, meaning of course derived from durum -- do you think that in
    > Australia it's just a generic term for any crushed wheat-germ? It
    > wouldn't be the same thing at all, of course, in that case.


    Semolina can be made from any type of wheat.
    A hard wheat like durum will give you more
    semolina per pound of wheat, but all wheats
    will produce some semolina when milled.

    Milling reduces the wheat berry to particles.
    The protein-rich heavy particles are called
    semolina. The starch-rich light particles
    are called dunst. Intermediate particles
    are called middlings.

    Flours are blends of these particles adapted
    for particular purposes. A cake flour will
    have more dunst, while a pasta flour will
    have more semolina.

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