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Thread: Sea salt fine grind

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Sea salt fine grind

    Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.

    Thank you in advance ...

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    On Feb 6, 12:03 pm, "william...@aol.com" <william...@aol.com> wrote:
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.


    A tv chef this morning put sugar into her food processor to make it
    finer grain. Perhaps the same would work for sea salt.

    What does salt have to do with fried rice? -aem



  3. #3
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...


    Yes, there is.

    You're welcome.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  4. #4
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...


    Just toss it in a blender for a few seconds. Easy.

    Serene

    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  5. #5
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    Dave Bugg wrote:
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind
    >> without using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making
    >> fried rice with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >>
    >> Thank you in advance ...

    >
    > Yes, there is.
    >
    > You're welcome.


    Oops, got distracted.

    Place salt on a baking sheet. Use a the bottom of a metal bowl to grind the
    salt.
    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  6. #6
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    On Feb 6, 1:20*pm, aem <aem_ag...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > What does salt have to do with fried rice? * * -aem
    >

    I don't know what the standard recipe for fried rice calls for, but I
    use soy sauce very lightly just enough to give it flavor and a streak
    of color, and salt it to taste. Any other ideas?



  7. #7
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...


    If you want to make something finer there are many ways to do it--my Dad,
    who learned to cook in the Pacific during WWII, used to wrap whatever it was
    in a towel and pound on it with a hammer. A coffee grinder (the little
    whirlygig kind) does fine as a spice grinder. A mortar and pestle will do
    the job. Or a food processor or a blender (glass jar only--spices will do a
    number on a plastic jar as I found out the hard way).

    That said, why would you want to make fried rice with sea salt? Soy sauce
    is a standard component and it is generally adequately salty.

    Fried rice isn't rocket science you know--throw some leftover rice and more
    or less pea-sized chunks of anything else that you like that's fryable in a
    hot skillet with some oil and stir until it's all hot and anything that
    needs to be cooked through is cooked, stir in an egg or two at the end if
    you like, and you're done. Forget the fancy recipes and learn to do it by
    the seat of your pants and you'll enjoy it more. Ordinary table salt works
    fine if you need it, but soy sauce generally puts as much salt into it as I
    want.





  8. #8
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    "[email protected]" wrote:
    >
    > On Feb 6, 1:20 pm, aem <aem_ag...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > >
    > > What does salt have to do with fried rice? -aem
    > >

    > I don't know what the standard recipe for fried rice calls for, but I
    > use soy sauce very lightly just enough to give it flavor and a streak
    > of color, and salt it to taste. Any other ideas?


    Yeah. Just use more soy sauce.

  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    "[email protected]" wrote:
    >
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...


    Mortar and pestle.

    How much is a pound of fine-grain salt these days?
    Not more than 50 cents, right?

  10. #10
    Stan Horwitz Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...


    Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you will
    taste any difference between regular table salt and finely ground sea
    salt in your fried rcie.

  11. #11
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    Stan Horwitz wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind
    >> without using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making
    >> fried rice with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >>
    >> Thank you in advance ...

    >
    > Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you
    > will taste any difference between regular table salt and finely
    > ground sea salt in your fried rcie.



    Yup...and only fools buy "sea salt" anyways...in fact the term "sea salt" is
    ridiculous as *all* salt is "sea salt", it's one of those silly terms a la'
    "shrimp scampi".


    --
    Best
    Greg



  12. #12
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind


    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    | Stan Horwitz wrote:
    |
    | > In article
    | > <[email protected]>,
    | > "[email protected]" <[email protected]> wrote:
    | >
    | >> Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind
    | >> without using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making
    | >> fried rice with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    | >>
    | >> Thank you in advance ...
    | >
    | > Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you
    | > will taste any difference between regular table salt and finely
    | > ground sea salt in your fried rcie.
    |
    |
    | Yup...and only fools buy "sea salt" anyways...in fact the term "sea salt" is
    | ridiculous as *all* salt is "sea salt", it's one of those silly terms a la'
    | "shrimp scampi".

    Yeah. You'd better send an email out to Mayo Clinic correcting their
    website. It's www.mayoclinic.com and just give them your credentials
    and ask them to correct the article.:
    http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sea-salt/AN01142

    "Sea salt is produced through evaporation of seawater..."
    "Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits..."

    pavane




  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    pavane wrote:
    >
    > | > Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you
    > | > will taste any difference between regular table salt and finely
    > | > ground sea salt in your fried rcie.
    > |
    > |
    > | Yup...and only fools buy "sea salt" anyways...in fact the term "sea salt" is
    > | ridiculous as *all* salt is "sea salt", it's one of those silly terms a la'
    > | "shrimp scampi".
    >
    > Yeah. You'd better send an email out to Mayo Clinic correcting their
    > website. It's www.mayoclinic.com and just give them your credentials
    > and ask them to correct the article.:
    > http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sea-salt/AN01142
    >
    > "Sea salt is produced through evaporation of seawater..."
    > "Table salt is mined from underground salt deposits..."


    There was a little more to that article. It said that sea salt is less
    refined and has trace elements. It also said that table salt has
    additives to prevent clumping. It also often has iodine added. FWIW, in
    Canada, all table salt is iodized.

    If you have salt water tropical fish you cannot used iodized salt. The
    iodine will kill them.

    It should be noted that the salt deposits that are mined are from
    ancient oceans that dried up. It will seem that, since all ocean water
    has basically the same elements dissolved in them, that salt deposits
    would have those same elements in them. Some people can taste the
    iodine in table salt.

  14. #14
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    On Feb 6, 2:47*pm, Stan Horwitz <s...@temple.edu> wrote:
    >
    > Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you will
    > taste any difference between regular table salt and finely ground sea
    > salt in your fried rice.
    >

    I read on the internet that the processing methods of the table salt
    (mined salt) strips away the ingredients that balance the effect of
    sodium on your body, whereas they are present in the sea salt. The
    author states that even though the amount of those balancing
    ingredients are very small, they have a measurable effect on your
    body, and further suggests to switch sea salt for table salt for a
    week if in doubt. So, this is the second day and the second meal.

  15. #15
    Kelvin Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Feb 6, 2:47 pm, Stan Horwitz <s...@temple.edu> wrote:
    >
    > Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you will
    > taste any difference between regular table salt and finely ground sea
    > salt in your fried rice.
    >

    I read on the internet that the processing methods of the table salt
    (mined salt) strips away the ingredients that balance the effect of
    sodium on your body, whereas they are present in the sea salt. The
    author states that even though the amount of those balancing
    ingredients are very small, they have a measurable effect on your
    body, and further suggests to switch sea salt for table salt for a
    week if in doubt. So, this is the second day and the second meal.

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Yeah! I read on the internet that if I send this guy in Madagascar my bank
    account number and my social security number, he would transfer 4.5 million
    dollars to my account.

    Do you want his contact information?



  16. #16
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...




    With a mortar and pestle? Spice or coffee grinder?
    Placed in a ziplock sandwich bag and run over with a rolling pin?

    gloria p

  17. #17
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind


    "Kelvin" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:hkkv7h$as7$[email protected]..
    |
    | <[email protected]> wrote in message
    | news:[email protected]...
    | On Feb 6, 2:47 pm, Stan Horwitz <s...@temple.edu> wrote:
    | >
    | > Why not use regular salt for your fried rice? I seriously doubt you will
    | > taste any difference between regular table salt and finely ground sea
    | > salt in your fried rice.
    | >
    | I read on the internet that the processing methods of the table salt
    | (mined salt) strips away the ingredients that balance the effect of
    | sodium on your body, whereas they are present in the sea salt. The
    | author states that even though the amount of those balancing
    | ingredients are very small, they have a measurable effect on your
    | body, and further suggests to switch sea salt for table salt for a
    | week if in doubt. So, this is the second day and the second meal.
    |
    | ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    |
    | Yeah! I read on the internet that if I send this guy in Madagascar my bank
    | account number and my social security number, he would transfer 4.5 million
    | dollars to my account.
    |
    | Do you want his contact information?

    Just send it to Sheldumb, or his sock-puppet Morrow, whoever the **** you are.

    pavane






    |
    |



  18. #18
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    On Feb 6, 3:33*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > "william...@aol.com" wrote:
    >
    > > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > > using a grinder, which I don't have. *I just tried making fried rice
    > > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.

    >
    > > Thank you in advance ...

    >
    > Mortar and pestle.
    >
    > How much is a pound of fine-grain salt these days?
    > Not more than 50 cents, right?


    The 1.5 pound containers cost about $2, as opposed to 39 cents for a
    2# container of regular. I use very fine ground on my table:
    http://www.diamondcrystalsalt.com/Cu...-Nut-Salt.aspx

    --Bryan

  19. #19
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind


    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    > using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    > with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.
    >
    > Thank you in advance ...


    Use dark soy sauce. It's mostly salt.

    Paul



  20. #20
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Sea salt fine grind

    "Paul M. Cook" wrote:
    >
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Is there anyway to make the coarse sea salt into a finer grind without
    >> using a grinder, which I don't have. I just tried making fried rice
    >> with sea salt but it does not seem to dissolve well.


    I really don't see the point to sea salt for fried rice... but no salt
    will dissolve in rice... and you don't need a salt grinder...
    dissolve sea salt in water and then add the sea salt brine... probably
    should have cooked the rice in water salted with sea salt.

    >Use dark soy sauce. It's mostly salt.


    Actually soy sauce is mostly water. But since soy sauce does contain
    substantial salt I wouldn't add any salt to fried rice until after
    adding the soy sauce and tasting, and then if it needed more salt I'd
    I add a bit of msg.


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