Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 59

Thread: "Scrap" stock

  1. #1
    Omelet Guest

    Default "Scrap" stock

    While I've always used bones and meat scraps for stock, I'd always used
    fresh veggies in the past. Whole sliced carrots, fresh peeled onions,
    whole stalks of celery etc.

    After a post on one of the cooking lists (this one I think) from a woman
    in Belgium that could not understand why we here in America tended to
    waste veggie trimmings, I started saving them just for grins in the
    freezer. Carrot tops, onion peels and tops etc. that I used to toss.
    Cabbage hearts too. I've always saved or used celery tops with leaves
    for stock.

    I made a pot of stock out of that stuff a couple of months ago and have
    saved it ever since! I swear it was some of the most richly flavored
    stock I've ever made. ;-d It really was good.

    I'm thinking that onion and carrot TOPS (and onion trimmings) are more
    intense in flavor than the "meat" of the veggie itself. Granted, it gets
    strained off and tossed when I'm done but still...

    The only drawback is is that that stuff takes up space and adds up
    quick. <g> I'm going on a frozen stock making binge this week.

    Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.

    The pot of stock I just finished smells incredibly good. Roasted rib
    bones, shrimp shells, carrot, celery and onion tops with garlic and salt
    free lemon pepper. Pressure cooked for one hour. Soon's it cools, I'll
    strain it off, defat and freeze it. Bones will go to the dogs and the
    now used veggie scraps will go into the compost.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  2. #2
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    >
    > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    >


    i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i guess
    you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean' than
    shrimp shells.

    your pal,
    blake

  3. #3
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article <1nnolw00hsuho$.oz9x9k0y[email protected]>,
    blake murphy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    > >

    >
    > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i guess
    > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean' than
    > shrimp shells.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Indeed.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  4. #4
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock


    blake murphy wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    > >

    >
    > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i guess
    > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean' than
    > shrimp shells.



    So, just wash 'em out first, blake...


    --
    Best
    Greg




  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > blake murphy wrote:
    >
    > > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    > > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    > > >

    > >
    > > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i guess
    > > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean' than
    > > shrimp shells.

    >
    >
    > So, just wash 'em out first, blake...


    Greg,

    have you used Crab shells for Stock? How did it turn out?
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  6. #6
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 09:59:40 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]> ,
    > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> blake murphy wrote:
    >>
    >> > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    >> > >
    >> > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    >> > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    >> > >
    >> >
    >> > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i guess
    >> > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean' than
    >> > shrimp shells.

    >>
    >>
    >> So, just wash 'em out first, blake...

    >
    >Greg,
    >
    >have you used Crab shells for Stock? How did it turn out?


    I use crab leg shells all the time. I save them along with shrimp
    shells and freeze them until I've got a big stockpot worth. I get a
    very rich stock that can be thinned down at soup time if it's too
    strong for you.

    Lou


  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 09:59:40 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]> ,
    > > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> blake murphy wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    > >> > >
    > >> > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    > >> > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    > >> > >
    > >> >
    > >> > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i
    > >> > guess
    > >> > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean' than
    > >> > shrimp shells.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> So, just wash 'em out first, blake...

    > >
    > >Greg,
    > >
    > >have you used Crab shells for Stock? How did it turn out?

    >
    > I use crab leg shells all the time. I save them along with shrimp
    > shells and freeze them until I've got a big stockpot worth. I get a
    > very rich stock that can be thinned down at soup time if it's too
    > strong for you.
    >
    > Lou


    Okay, thanks.

    I do have some frozen crab leg shells, was just leery of using them due
    to the strength. I'll give it a shot.

    I like to make a shrimp shell stock for clam or oyster chowders so had
    considered using crab shells. I don't eat a lot of crab due to the
    price but I do have a few frozen shells from the last time snow crab was
    on sale. :-)

    Thanks again.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lou Decruss wrote:
    >
    > > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 09:59:40 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > > >In article <[email protected]> ,
    > > > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > >> blake murphy wrote:
    > > >>
    > > >> > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    > > >> > >
    > > >> > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a

    > bit
    > > >> > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    > > >> > >
    > > >> >
    > > >> > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i

    > guess
    > > >> > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean'

    > than
    > > >> > shrimp shells.
    > > >>
    > > >>
    > > >> So, just wash 'em out first, blake...
    > > >
    > > >Greg,
    > > >
    > > >have you used Crab shells for Stock? How did it turn out?

    > >
    > > I use crab leg shells all the time. I save them along with shrimp
    > > shells and freeze them until I've got a big stockpot worth. I get a
    > > very rich stock that can be thinned down at soup time if it's too
    > > strong for you.

    >
    >
    > I've never made stock from crab shells and in any case I was kidding about
    > "washing" them...but yeah, they'd make a good stock.
    >
    > ;-)


    <lol> So give it a shot. I will...

    Dad loves Oyster stew. Seems to me a good seafood shell stock should
    work for that.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  9. #9
    Gregory Morrow Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock





    Lou Decruss wrote:

    > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 09:59:40 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]> ,
    > > "Gregory Morrow" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> blake murphy wrote:
    > >>
    > >> > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:
    > >> > >
    > >> > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a

    bit
    > >> > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    > >> > >
    > >> >
    > >> > i would be hesitant as well. i've not heard of it being done, but i

    guess
    > >> > you could google it. crab shells would typically be less 'clean'

    than
    > >> > shrimp shells.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> So, just wash 'em out first, blake...

    > >
    > >Greg,
    > >
    > >have you used Crab shells for Stock? How did it turn out?

    >
    > I use crab leg shells all the time. I save them along with shrimp
    > shells and freeze them until I've got a big stockpot worth. I get a
    > very rich stock that can be thinned down at soup time if it's too
    > strong for you.



    I've never made stock from crab shells and in any case I was kidding about
    "washing" them...but yeah, they'd make a good stock.

    ;-)


    --
    Best
    Greg



  10. #10
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 10:26:09 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> I use crab leg shells all the time. I save them along with shrimp
    >> shells and freeze them until I've got a big stockpot worth. I get a
    >> very rich stock that can be thinned down at soup time if it's too
    >> strong for you.
    >>
    >> Lou

    >
    >Okay, thanks.
    >
    >I do have some frozen crab leg shells, was just leery of using them due
    >to the strength. I'll give it a shot.
    >
    >I like to make a shrimp shell stock for clam or oyster chowders so had
    >considered using crab shells. I don't eat a lot of crab due to the
    >price but I do have a few frozen shells from the last time snow crab was
    >on sale. :-)
    >
    >Thanks again.


    You're welcome.

    Yes they are expensive if you get decent sized ones. I love them but
    hate the ritual of eating them. Louise is the crab leg person here so
    we usually have them every few months. I dig into my pile with a
    kitchen shear and save most of the meat. I'll eat some but I'd rather
    have a steak or burger or whatever. When the stock is done I add a
    roux and cream. I add shallots, garlic, roasted red pepper and
    whatever else strikes my fancy that day, and the reserved crab meat
    and some shrimp. Louise doesn't like scallops or I'd add some of
    those too. Sometimes canned oysters end up in there too. I usually use
    paprika, pepper and worcestershire. Sometime a dash of cayenne. I
    don't know if it's a soup or a chowder but whatever it is it's always
    good.

    Lou

  11. #11
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On Oct 12, 11:27*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > In article <2u-dnfYW4ZYQi2_VnZ2dnUVZ_gedn...@earthlink.com>,
    > *"Gregory Morrow" <xxxaa...@xxikkkix.be> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Lou Decruss wrote:

    >
    > > > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 09:59:40 -0500, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com>
    > > > wrote:

    >
    > > > >In article <p_2dndlDJ7tklm_VnZ2dnUVZ_szin...@earthlink.com> ,
    > > > > "Gregory Morrow" <xxxaa...@xxikkkix.be> wrote:

    >
    > > > >> blake murphy wrote:

    >
    > > > >> > On Sun, 12 Oct 2008 04:31:53 -0500, Omelet wrote:

    >
    > > > >> > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'ma

    > > bit
    > > > >> > > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.

    >
    > > > >> > i would be hesitant as well. *i've not heard of it being done,but i

    > > guess
    > > > >> > you could google it. *crab shells would typically be less 'clean'

    > > than
    > > > >> > shrimp shells.

    >
    > > > >> So, just wash 'em out first, blake...

    >
    > > > >Greg,

    >
    > > > >have you used Crab shells for Stock? *How did it turn out?

    >
    > > > I use crab leg shells all the time. *I save them along with shrimp
    > > > shells and freeze them until I've got a big stockpot worth. *I get a
    > > > very rich stock that can be thinned down at soup time if it's too
    > > > strong for you.

    >
    > > I've never made stock from crab shells and in any case I was kidding about
    > > "washing" them...but yeah, they'd make a good stock.

    >
    > > ;-)

    >
    > <lol> So give it a shot. *I will...
    >
    > Dad loves Oyster stew. Seems to me a good seafood shell stock should
    > work for that.
    > --
    > Peace! Om
    >
    > "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    > --Om
    >
    > "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    > -- Steve Rothstein


    After making your vegetable stock, puree the vegetables for adding to
    soups, sauces, etc.

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Lou Decruss <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Thanks again.

    >
    > You're welcome.
    >
    > Yes they are expensive if you get decent sized ones. I love them but
    > hate the ritual of eating them. Louise is the crab leg person here so
    > we usually have them every few months. I dig into my pile with a
    > kitchen shear and save most of the meat. I'll eat some but I'd rather
    > have a steak or burger or whatever. When the stock is done I add a
    > roux and cream. I add shallots, garlic, roasted red pepper and
    > whatever else strikes my fancy that day, and the reserved crab meat
    > and some shrimp. Louise doesn't like scallops or I'd add some of
    > those too. Sometimes canned oysters end up in there too. I usually use
    > paprika, pepper and worcestershire. Sometime a dash of cayenne. I
    > don't know if it's a soup or a chowder but whatever it is it's always
    > good.
    >
    > Lou


    Okay, that's saved to disk. ;-d
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > After making your vegetable stock, puree the vegetables for adding to
    > soups, sauces, etc.


    I do when I use fresh veggies, NOT when I am using scraps!

    I doubt onion skins would puree well. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  14. #14
    aem Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On Oct 12, 2:31*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > While I've always used bones and meat scraps for stock, I'd always *used
    > fresh veggies in the past. Whole sliced carrots, fresh peeled onions,
    > whole stalks of celery etc. [snip]
    >
    > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. [snip]


    Rather than mixing them with other things, I save shrimp shells in the
    freezer for when I want a fish/seafood stock. It only takes about
    half an hour.

    Generally speaking I think saving veggie scraps is okay. I don't,
    because I favor plain chicken stock, unflavored by a lot of veggies.
    At times in the past we've felt "green" enough to save veggie scraps
    for composting, but whenever we've tried we've found that composting
    is more work and less productive than we wanted. Maybe we've just
    never learned enough to do it right. -aem

  15. #15
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    aem <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Oct 12, 2:31*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > While I've always used bones and meat scraps for stock, I'd always *used
    > > fresh veggies in the past. Whole sliced carrots, fresh peeled onions,
    > > whole stalks of celery etc. [snip]
    > >
    > > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. [snip]

    >
    > Rather than mixing them with other things, I save shrimp shells in the
    > freezer for when I want a fish/seafood stock. It only takes about
    > half an hour.


    I normally do too, but I'm making rice this week so decided to try
    mixing a bit of shrimp shells with the beef bones to enrich it. Sure
    smelled good! I generally keep seafood and mammal or poultry scraps
    separate. Mom used to make a mixed bone stock from chicken, beef and
    pork.

    >
    > Generally speaking I think saving veggie scraps is okay. I don't,
    > because I favor plain chicken stock, unflavored by a lot of veggies.
    > At times in the past we've felt "green" enough to save veggie scraps
    > for composting, but whenever we've tried we've found that composting
    > is more work and less productive than we wanted. Maybe we've just
    > never learned enough to do it right. -aem


    I dare you to try just one batch for stock. <g> It really is very good!
    I pressure cook it all for one hour, then strain it off. Refrigerate in
    a bowl overnight for defatting, then freeze it or use it as needed.

    Compost the cooked remains.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "He who has the gold makes the rules"
    --Om

    "He who has the guns can get the gold."
    -- Steve Rothstein

  16. #16
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    aem wrote:
    > On Oct 12, 2:31 am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> While I've always used bones and meat scraps for stock, I'd always used
    >> fresh veggies in the past. Whole sliced carrots, fresh peeled onions,
    >> whole stalks of celery etc. [snip]
    >>
    >> Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. [snip]

    >
    > Rather than mixing them with other things, I save shrimp shells in the
    > freezer for when I want a fish/seafood stock. It only takes about
    > half an hour.
    >
    > Generally speaking I think saving veggie scraps is okay. I don't,
    > because I favor plain chicken stock, unflavored by a lot of veggies.
    > At times in the past we've felt "green" enough to save veggie scraps
    > for composting, but whenever we've tried we've found that composting
    > is more work and less productive than we wanted. Maybe we've just
    > never learned enough to do it right. -aem


    We pothole compost vegetable scraps. Go out in the garden or flower bed,
    dig a small hole, put in scraps, cover with dirt from hole. Come back in
    a week and the earthworms and soil bacteria have converted it all to
    soil. If you include citrus peels and egg shells it takes two or three
    weeks. Don't put any meat scraps in there though, that attracts varmints.

  17. #17
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On 2008-10-12, Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:


    > I made a pot of stock out of that stuff a couple of months ago and have
    > saved it ever since! I swear it was some of the most richly flavored
    > stock I've ever made. ;-d It really was good.


    Welcome to the World of real cooking!

    nb

  18. #18
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    "Omelet" wrote

    > While I've always used bones and meat scraps for stock, I'd always used
    > fresh veggies in the past. Whole sliced carrots, fresh peeled onions,
    > whole stalks of celery etc.
    >
    > After a post on one of the cooking lists (this one I think) from a woman
    > in Belgium that could not understand why we here in America tended to
    > waste veggie trimmings, I started saving them just for grins in the
    > freezer. Carrot tops, onion peels and tops etc. that I used to toss.
    > Cabbage hearts too. I've always saved or used celery tops with leaves
    > for stock.


    That is how it is done. Those of us with an extra chest freezer, just tuck
    a baggie that grows with such, in there. Once you have enough, make soup!

    > I made a pot of stock out of that stuff a couple of months ago and have
    > saved it ever since! I swear it was some of the most richly flavored
    > stock I've ever made. ;-d It really was good.


    Onions skins and the root bit I bet were in there. It was many years ago,
    but a friend who's flipena was at my house when I peeled one and asked for
    the peelings. I asked her why and have saved them since. She taught me
    many other things to save as time went on. Eddo peelings was a big one
    (small taro in english, forgot her name for them) and lotus root peels.

    > I'm thinking that onion and carrot TOPS (and onion trimmings) are more
    > intense in flavor than the "meat" of the veggie itself. Granted, it gets
    > strained off and tossed when I'm done but still...


    Quite true!

    > The only drawback is is that that stuff takes up space and adds up
    > quick. <g> I'm going on a frozen stock making binge this week.


    Hehe my method is a few bags in one of the bins in the chest freezer. They
    get added to. One has onion skins and the root bit (all types mixed as I
    use red, white, yellow etc). Another has 'root vegetable peels' like yams,
    potatoes, daikon. (eddo is separated as it's flavor is unique and doesnt
    match everything, also it's not used just for stock here but a dish of it's
    own). Another gets seafood shells (normally shrimp shells-heads-tails but
    itty bitty local blue crab legs etc land in there too and when I get'em,
    crawdad leftover shells and heads). A big one gets crunched up chicken
    carcasses, one gets pork bones, and another gets beef bones.

    Once any one of them is full enough, it's stock making time.

    > free lemon pepper. Pressure cooked for one hour. Soon's it cools, I'll


    I crockpot all mine. Thats ok, a pressure cooker works too I am told!



  19. #19
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock


    "Omelet" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news[email protected]..
    > While I've always used bones and meat scraps for stock, I'd always used
    > fresh veggies in the past. Whole sliced carrots, fresh peeled onions,
    > whole stalks of celery etc.
    >
    > After a post on one of the cooking lists (this one I think) from a woman
    > in Belgium that could not understand why we here in America tended to
    > waste veggie trimmings, I started saving them just for grins in the
    > freezer. Carrot tops, onion peels and tops etc. that I used to toss.
    > Cabbage hearts too. I've always saved or used celery tops with leaves
    > for stock.
    >
    > I made a pot of stock out of that stuff a couple of months ago and have
    > saved it ever since! I swear it was some of the most richly flavored
    > stock I've ever made. ;-d It really was good.
    >
    > I'm thinking that onion and carrot TOPS (and onion trimmings) are more
    > intense in flavor than the "meat" of the veggie itself. Granted, it gets
    > strained off and tossed when I'm done but still...
    >
    > The only drawback is is that that stuff takes up space and adds up
    > quick. <g> I'm going on a frozen stock making binge this week.
    >
    > Another thing that makes wonderful stock is shrimp shells. I'm a bit
    > leery of crab shells. They are intensely fishy smelling.
    >
    > The pot of stock I just finished smells incredibly good. Roasted rib
    > bones, shrimp shells, carrot, celery and onion tops with garlic and salt
    > free lemon pepper. Pressure cooked for one hour. Soon's it cools, I'll
    > strain it off, defat and freeze it. Bones will go to the dogs and the
    > now used veggie scraps will go into the compost.
    > --
    > Peace! Om



    It occurred to me that making stock for a specific purpose is a recent
    thing. IIRC a stock pot simply sat on the stove most of the time and the
    trimmings you spoke of were routinely just thrown into the pot. Occasionally
    the resulting broth was strained and used as the basis for soups which for
    many centuries was the meal. Hence peas porridge hot peas porridge cold
    peas porridge in the pot nine days old.

    I'm not sure how many it killed but that's another story.

    Dimitri

    Dimitri


  20. #20
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: "Scrap" stock

    On Oct 12, 3:46�pm, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > On 2008-10-12, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > I made a pot of stock out of that stuff a couple of months ago and have
    > > saved it ever since! �I swear it was some of the most richly flavored
    > > stock I've ever made. ;-d �It really was good.


    TIAD

    > Welcome to the World of real cooking! �


    Bull****... welcome to the world of cheap bastard **** eater.

    Why would any normal brained person want to waste their time and
    energy preparing stock from garbage... may as well use bouillion
    cubes, they are much better. If I'm gonna take the time and make the
    effort to prepare home made stock it's going to be from the finest
    freshest most wholesome ingredients. Veggies in the US just ain't
    all that expensive that I gotta horde slimey rotten produce like a
    starving POW... yoose are mentally ill, very SICK!


Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32