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Thread: Scrabble Quisine

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Scrabble Quisine

    I was playing scrabble earlier in the week with my non-foodie
    friends, and they've learned not to question my food and cooking
    related words. Of course they have their own specialties and
    professions that come with their own small set of obscure words, but
    nothing to the extent that cooking and cuisine provides. For
    example, doctors have a huge, obscure vocabulary but most words are
    Latin or too long. A tool fabricator has a pretty good, short word
    vocabulary, though.

    You of course have to watch out for foreign words. Crepe, Creme,
    Souffle, Haricot, and Confit, and Ghee at one time were considered
    foreign words but have since been accepted into the OSPD. So it's
    gotten less frustrating. But rillette, buerre, and paneer are not.
    There's really no rhyme or reason to it, from a culinary standpoint,
    that is.

    Bit my coupe de grace the other night was playing "quisines" for
    over 200 points. Even to the moderate speller, with no interest in
    food, that word actually *looks* right. Of course there are some
    acting abilities that are necessary to play such a word with a
    straight face, and maintain it until the next person starts their
    turn. But since I wasn't known as a bluffer - like some who are
    coincidently bad at it - this one passed scrutiny without much
    trouble.

    Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". So now they'll start me
    challenging me on words again and usually lose.

    ObTangibleFood: I'm off to make sausage balls.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On May 22, 10:14*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > I was playing scrabble earlier in the week with my non-foodie
    > friends, and they've learned not to question my food and cooking
    > related words. *Of course they have their own specialties and
    > professions that come with their own small set of obscure words, but
    > nothing to the extent that cooking and cuisine provides. *For
    > example, doctors have a huge, obscure vocabulary but most words are
    > Latin or too long. *A tool fabricator has a pretty good, short word
    > vocabulary, though.
    >
    > You of course have to watch out for foreign words. *Crepe, Creme,
    > Souffle, Haricot, and Confit, and Ghee at one time were considered
    > foreign words but have since been accepted into the OSPD. * So it's
    > gotten less frustrating. *But rillette, buerre, and paneer are not.
    > There's really no rhyme or reason to it, from a culinary standpoint,
    > that is.
    >
    > Bit my coupe de grace the other night was playing "quisines" for
    > over 200 points. *Even to the moderate speller, with no interest in
    > food, that word actually *looks* right. *Of course there are some
    > acting abilities that are necessary to play such a word with a
    > straight face, and maintain it until the next person starts their
    > turn. *But since I wasn't known as a bluffer - like some who are
    > coincidently bad at it - this one passed scrutiny without much
    > trouble.
    >
    > Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    > game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    > spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". *So now they'll start me
    > challenging me on words again and usually lose.
    >
    > ObTangibleFood: *I'm off to make sausage balls.
    >
    > -sw


    ==
    Anyone who would play "quisines" should be penalized at least 100
    points...sacrilege.
    ==

  3. #3
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    rOn Sat, 22 May 2010 14:40:54 -0700 (PDT) in rec.food.cooking, Roy <[email protected]> wrote,
    >
    >Anyone who would play "quisines" should be penalized at least 100
    >points...sacrilege.
    >==


    "Dammed poor man indeed that can't spell the same word at least three
    different ways"
    -- Andrew Jackson 1820

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 14:40:54 -0700 (PDT), Roy wrote:

    > Anyone who would play "quisines" should be penalized at least 100
    > points...sacrilege.


    Aww, you're just jealous because I got away with it!

    -sw

  5. #5
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On May 22, 9:18*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Sat, 22 May 2010 14:40:54 -0700 (PDT), Roy wrote:
    > > Anyone who would play "quisines" should be penalized at least 100
    > > points...sacrilege.

    >
    > Aww, you're just jealous because I got away with it!
    >
    > -sw


    ==
    Well, I'm sure that I would have challenged you on that one. Scrabble
    players are craftier than poker players in my estimation.
    I play Scrabble nearly every day, its supposed to delay Alzheimer
    onset, but who the hell knows for sure.
    ==

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    Roy wrote:

    > I play Scrabble nearly every day, its supposed to delay Alzheimer onset,
    > but who the hell knows for sure.


    I used to know for sure. :-)

    Bob


  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I was playing scrabble earlier in the week with my non-foodie

    (snip)
    > Bit my coupe de grace the other night was playing "quisines" for
    > over 200 points. Even to the moderate speller, with no interest in
    > food, that word actually *looks* right. Of course there are some
    > acting abilities that are necessary to play such a word with a
    > straight face, and maintain it until the next person starts their
    > turn. But since I wasn't known as a bluffer - like some who are
    > coincidently bad at it - this one passed scrutiny without much
    > trouble.
    >
    > Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    > game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    > spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". So now they'll start me
    > challenging me on words again and usually lose.


    >
    > -sw


    Your strategic play could land you a spot on Survivor.


    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Updated 4-24-2010 with food story and pictures

  8. #8
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    Sqwertz wrote:

    > Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    > game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    > spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". So now they'll start me
    > challenging me on words again and usually lose.


    Good quisine and you'll see lots of people spell it that way,
    whether being cutsie with a name or actually describing their
    food. No wonder it looked right to people.

    nancy

  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 07:17:12 -0500, Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Your strategic play could land you a spot on Survivor.


    Sorry - I don't do reality shows. Just strip shows.

    -sw

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 08:42:49 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    >> game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    >> spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". So now they'll start me
    >> challenging me on words again and usually lose.

    >
    > Good quisine and you'll see lots of people spell it that way,
    > whether being cutsie with a name or actually describing their
    > food. No wonder it looked right to people.


    I didn't think about Googling it, but there are 50,000 hits for it.
    (and 95 million for 'cuisine'). But yeah - there are lots of cutsie
    uses of it, especially in restaurant names, websites, and other
    trademarks.

    -sw


  11. #11
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    Is "oystery" in the Scrabble dictionary? I saw that in a
    news report the other day. Seven-letter word.

    Almost on-topic even.


    Steve

  12. #12
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 20:23:50 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > Is "oystery" in the Scrabble dictionary? I saw that in a
    > news report the other day. Seven-letter word.
    >
    > Almost on-topic even.


    http://scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/oystery

    I don't have a copy of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary and
    I doubt it's online, but:

    http://scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/oystery

    BTW: "Za" was added to the 4th (or 3rd?) edition back in 2003 or
    so. So now it's incredibly easy to use up your "Z". Anybody want
    to venture to guess what a "za" is?

    Cheaters will look it up anyway - it's a "pizza". Stupid, if you
    ask me.

    -sw

  13. #13
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    Steve wrote on Sun, 23 May 2010 20:23:50 +0000 (UTC):

    > Almost on-topic even.
    >Is "oystery" in the Scrabble dictionary? I saw that in a
    >news report the other day. Seven-letter word.


    Never mind that travesty, the Scrabble Dictionary, "oystery" is even in
    the Oxford English Dictionary, tho' it's not a noun but an adjective
    meaning "characteristic or reminiscent of an oyster" or "abounding in
    oysters".



    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  14. #14
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 23 May 2010 20:23:50 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:


    >> Is "oystery" in the Scrabble dictionary? I saw that in a
    >> news report the other day. Seven-letter word.


    >> Almost on-topic even.


    >http://scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/oystery


    >I don't have a copy of the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary and
    >I doubt it's online, but:


    >http://scrabblelookup.com/word/portion/search/oystery


    You see, I want to organize a Scrabble game where the only
    allowed words are words that, while part of the language,
    are not in the official Scrabble dictionary. So, things
    like oystery, runrig, and pahos. And whatever cuss words
    they deliberately left out.

    >BTW: "Za" was added to the 4th (or 3rd?) edition back in 2003 or
    >so. So now it's incredibly easy to use up your "Z". Anybody want
    >to venture to guess what a "za" is?


    >Cheaters will look it up anyway - it's a "pizza". Stupid, if you
    >ask me.


    Weird. There's a pizza restaurant called "Zza's" in Oakland.
    The story there is they took over the restaurant and to save
    money wanted to use part of the previous operator's signage.

    But no "Za" that I have heard of.

    Steve

  15. #15
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    James Silverton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Steve wrote on Sun, 23 May 2010 20:23:50 +0000 (UTC):


    >> Almost on-topic even.
    >>Is "oystery" in the Scrabble dictionary? I saw that in a
    >>news report the other day. Seven-letter word.


    >Never mind that travesty, the Scrabble Dictionary, "oystery" is even in
    >the Oxford English Dictionary, tho' it's not a noun but an adjective
    >meaning "characteristic or reminiscent of an oyster" or "abounding in
    >oysters".


    Interesting, that is not how I saw it used in the press recently.
    The "oystery" (noun) in the Gulf of Mexico refers to the
    oyster reefs and associated oyster habitat.

    It's the last viable oystery in the world, said the article.
    Too bad it's going down.


    Steve

  16. #16
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sun, 23 May 2010 08:42:49 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>
    >>> Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    >>> game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    >>> spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". So now they'll start me
    >>> challenging me on words again and usually lose.

    >>
    >> Good quisine and you'll see lots of people spell it that way,
    >> whether being cutsie with a name or actually describing their
    >> food. No wonder it looked right to people.

    >
    > I didn't think about Googling it, but there are 50,000 hits for it.
    > (and 95 million for 'cuisine'). But yeah - there are lots of cutsie
    > uses of it, especially in restaurant names, websites, and other
    > trademarks.


    Haha, did I say Good quisine, what were my fingers doing,
    disobeying my brain that was thinking Google. But you got it.

    nancy

  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 20:49:09 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>BTW: "Za" was added to the 4th (or 3rd?) edition back in 2003 or
    >>so. So now it's incredibly easy to use up your "Z". Anybody want
    >>to venture to guess what a "za" is?

    >
    >>Cheaters will look it up anyway - it's a "pizza". Stupid, if you
    >>ask me.

    >
    > Weird. There's a pizza restaurant called "Zza's" in Oakland.
    > The story there is they took over the restaurant and to save
    > money wanted to use part of the previous operator's signage.
    >
    > But no "Za" that I have heard of.


    http://www.yelp.com/biz/za-gourmet-pizza-san-francisco

    There's are lots of restaurants utilizing "za" nowadays. We have a
    "Za's zas" here in Austin somewhere (I know I designed the
    restrooms, but never paid attention to where it was).

    -sw

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 16:44:28 -0400, James Silverton wrote:

    > Never mind that travesty, the Scrabble Dictionary, "oystery" is even in
    > the Oxford English Dictionary, tho' it's not a noun but an adjective
    > meaning "characteristic or reminiscent of an oyster" or "abounding in
    > oysters".


    I would have thought it was an osyter farm. Just like a fishery.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sun, 23 May 2010 17:02:10 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    >> On Sun, 23 May 2010 08:42:49 -0400, Nancy Young wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Of course I waited until I got home with my newfound $20 (lost one
    >>>> game, won the other) before I emailed them and told them how to
    >>>> spell "cuisine" ("you idiots! :-)". So now they'll start me
    >>>> challenging me on words again and usually lose.
    >>>
    >>> Good quisine and you'll see lots of people spell it that way,
    >>> whether being cutsie with a name or actually describing their
    >>> food. No wonder it looked right to people.

    >>
    >> I didn't think about Googling it, but there are 50,000 hits for it.
    >> (and 95 million for 'cuisine'). But yeah - there are lots of cutsie
    >> uses of it, especially in restaurant names, websites, and other
    >> trademarks.

    >
    > Haha, did I say Good quisine, what were my fingers doing,
    > disobeying my brain that was thinking Google. But you got it.


    I've re-read some of my posts lately and they turned out much worse
    than yours. So figuring yours out was nothing.

    -sw

  20. #20
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Scrabble Quisine

    On Sat, 22 May 2010 23:15:08 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > Roy wrote:
    >
    >> I play Scrabble nearly every day, its supposed to delay Alzheimer onset,
    >> but who the hell knows for sure.

    >
    > I used to know for sure. :-)
    >
    > Bob


    <snort>

    gotta tip my hat for that one.

    your pal,
    blake

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