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Thread: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

  1. #1
    Theron Guest

    Default Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's tasty
    with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome thoughts.

    1 medium onion, chopped - 1 cup
    3 stalks celery, chopped - 1 cup
    1 1/2 lb bulk Italian Sausage
    1 1/2 Cups milk
    1 1/2 C white wine
    2 C canned diced tomatoes
    1 TB dried provencial herbs
    1 TB dried oregano
    salt and pepper to taste.

    Brown onion, dried provencial herbs and dried oregano lightly for 5 minutes;
    add celery and cook another five minutes. Add sausage, and saute lightly,
    only until the meat loses color. Add milk and simmer 10 minutes, reducing
    milk by about 75%. Add wine and let wine-milk simmer until almost absorbed,
    leaving about a cup. Strain to separate meat from remaining cooking liquid.
    Use separator funnel to remove fat from cooking liquie. Combine meat,
    cooking liquid and tomatoes in sauce pan. Slowly warm so sauce ebulates
    only slightly. Cook partially covered for 3 hours, adding water if too much
    evaporation occurs. .

    Toss to your liking with pasta. We like fresh linguini, which we fortunately
    can obtain readily here. Top with grated cheese of choice. Serve with garlic
    bread.

    Ed, getting hungry as I type.







  2. #2
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Theron <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's tasty
    >with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome thoughts.


    >1 medium onion, chopped - 1 cup
    >3 stalks celery, chopped - 1 cup
    >1 1/2 lb bulk Italian Sausage
    >1 1/2 Cups milk
    >1 1/2 C white wine
    >2 C canned diced tomatoes
    >1 TB dried provencial herbs
    >1 TB dried oregano
    >salt and pepper to taste.


    Sounds really good. (But no garlic??)

    Tonight I plan to make a boar ragu, to have over polenta.
    Same concept, but without the milk.

    Steve

  3. #3
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 23:41:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:


    >Tonight I plan to make a boar ragu, to have over polenta.
    >Same concept, but without the milk.
    >
    >Steve


    Wow, that seems like a wintry dish... I usually only serve things like
    that in much, much cooler weather, even cold weather...
    Now I know Berkeley is cooler, but THAT much cooler???

    Me, I am making aioli, to go with a summery pasta dish from one of
    Deborah Madison's books. I got gorgeous ripe tomatoes from the
    farmers market on the way home from work this morning... Along with
    some heavenly ripe peaches. And some sweet yellow corn.

    Christine, who just can't think of such wintry type foods in such warm
    weather..
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  4. #4
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 23:41:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve



    >>Tonight I plan to make a boar ragu, to have over polenta.
    >>Same concept, but without the milk.


    >Wow, that seems like a wintry dish... I usually only serve things like
    >that in much, much cooler weather, even cold weather...
    >Now I know Berkeley is cooler, but THAT much cooler???


    It's actually a little warm here today. Maybe 75 peak,
    but cooling off.

    We stumbled into this; my partner had made up a batch of
    polenta already, there are tomatoes, and there was ground
    "wild boar" at the market. (Not from wild animals, but
    a supposed "wild" breed of boar.) So it seems like a suitable
    combination. And basil, a bunch of basil will go in it.
    I will not cook down the tomatoes to the point of full-fledged
    ragu-ness, this will be more of a fresh tomato sauce.

    >Me, I am making aioli, to go with a summery pasta dish from one of
    >Deborah Madison's books. I got gorgeous ripe tomatoes from the
    >farmers market on the way home from work this morning... Along with
    >some heavenly ripe peaches. And some sweet yellow corn.


    Sounds wonderful!


    Steve

  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 23:41:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve

    >
    >
    >>> Tonight I plan to make a boar ragu, to have over polenta.
    >>> Same concept, but without the milk.

    >
    >> Wow, that seems like a wintry dish... I usually only serve things like
    >> that in much, much cooler weather, even cold weather...
    >> Now I know Berkeley is cooler, but THAT much cooler???

    >
    > It's actually a little warm here today. Maybe 75 peak,
    > but cooling off.
    >
    > We stumbled into this; my partner had made up a batch of
    > polenta already, there are tomatoes, and there was ground
    > "wild boar" at the market. (Not from wild animals, but
    > a supposed "wild" breed of boar.) So it seems like a suitable
    > combination. And basil, a bunch of basil will go in it.
    > I will not cook down the tomatoes to the point of full-fledged
    > ragu-ness, this will be more of a fresh tomato sauce.
    >
    >> Me, I am making aioli, to go with a summery pasta dish from one of
    >> Deborah Madison's books. I got gorgeous ripe tomatoes from the
    >> farmers market on the way home from work this morning... Along with
    >> some heavenly ripe peaches. And some sweet yellow corn.

    >
    > Sounds wonderful!
    >
    >
    > Steve


    Please report on the boar. Here when restaurants use that term I
    think it is just pork.

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Sun, 9 Aug 2009 01:05:14 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    Pope) wrote:


    >It's actually a little warm here today. Maybe 75 peak,
    >but cooling off.
    >
    >We stumbled into this; my partner had made up a batch of
    >polenta already, there are tomatoes, and there was ground
    >"wild boar" at the market. (Not from wild animals, but
    >a supposed "wild" breed of boar.) So it seems like a suitable
    >combination. And basil, a bunch of basil will go in it.
    >I will not cook down the tomatoes to the point of full-fledged
    >ragu-ness, this will be more of a fresh tomato sauce.


    Ah, that sounds more summery. All I could envision was a wintry type
    sauce..that was cooked for a long time.

    >
    >>Me, I am making aioli, to go with a summery pasta dish from one of
    >>Deborah Madison's books. I got gorgeous ripe tomatoes from the
    >>farmers market on the way home from work this morning... Along with
    >>some heavenly ripe peaches. And some sweet yellow corn.

    >
    >Sounds wonderful!


    Oh it is!! I only make this when the summer vegetables are
    here..especially the tomatoes. It is the essence of summer to me...

    However, just found out I am out of red onions...I have never made it
    with regular onions, but I am not feeling like running to the store
    just to get some. So, it will be made with my regular onions. Won't
    be as pretty...but it will still taste good, I am sure.

    Now, I just need a glass of rose to accompany it...that it is ultimate
    summer wine, I think.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Sat 08 Aug 2009 04:51:19p, Christine Dabney told us...

    > On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 23:41:52 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Steve
    > Pope) wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Tonight I plan to make a boar ragu, to have over polenta.
    >>Same concept, but without the milk.
    >>
    >>Steve

    >
    > Wow, that seems like a wintry dish... I usually only serve things like
    > that in much, much cooler weather, even cold weather...
    > Now I know Berkeley is cooler, but THAT much cooler???
    >
    > Me, I am making aioli, to go with a summery pasta dish from one of
    > Deborah Madison's books. I got gorgeous ripe tomatoes from the
    > farmers market on the way home from work this morning... Along with
    > some heavenly ripe peaches. And some sweet yellow corn.
    >
    > Christine, who just can't think of such wintry type foods in such warm
    > weather..


    If you live in a well air conditioned house, it's never "hot" weather
    inside. I cook anything any time and enjoy it. A couple of weeks ago I
    made a batch of Pfeffernuesse, which is typically considered a Christmas
    cookie. They were delicious.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------
    My soul is dark with stormy riot, Directly traceable to diet.
    Samuel Hoffenstein




  8. #8
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Jean B. <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Please report on the boar. Here when restaurants use that term I
    >think it is just pork.


    Well, certainly it's pork, it's from a pig, but that pig should be
    of the species _sus scrofa_ instead of _sus domesticus_ .

    I'm part way through making this ragu. The boar is very good,
    but I would say no better than the same farmer's normal pork.
    It's just what he was selling today. Oddly, it's a little
    paler in color than the normal stuff.

    Steve

  9. #9
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 16:34:27 -0700, Theron wrote:

    > I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's tasty
    > with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome thoughts.
    >
    > 1 medium onion, chopped - 1 cup
    > 3 stalks celery, chopped - 1 cup
    > 1 1/2 lb bulk Italian Sausage
    > 1 1/2 Cups milk
    > 1 1/2 C white wine
    > 2 C canned diced tomatoes
    > 1 TB dried provencial herbs
    > 1 TB dried oregano
    > salt and pepper to taste.
    >
    > Brown onion, dried provencial herbs and dried oregano lightly for 5 minutes;
    > add celery and cook another five minutes. Add sausage, and saute lightly,
    > only until the meat loses color. Add milk and simmer 10 minutes, reducing
    > milk by about 75%. Add wine and let wine-milk simmer until almost absorbed,
    > leaving about a cup. Strain to separate meat from remaining cooking liquid.
    > Use separator funnel to remove fat from cooking liquie. Combine meat,
    > cooking liquid and tomatoes in sauce pan. Slowly warm so sauce ebulates
    > only slightly. Cook partially covered for 3 hours, adding water if too much
    > evaporation occurs. .


    what does 'ebulates' mean? google was not much help.

    your pal,
    blake

  10. #10
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Aug 9, 8:33*am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 16:34:27 -0700, Theron wrote:
    > > I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's tasty
    > > with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome thoughts..

    > [snip ingredients]
    > > Brown onion, dried provencial herbs and dried oregano lightly for 5 minutes;
    > > add celery and cook another five minutes. *Add sausage, and saute lightly,
    > > only until the meat loses color. *Add milk and simmer 10 minutes, reducing
    > > milk by about *75%. Add wine and let wine-milk simmer until almost absorbed,
    > > leaving about a cup. Strain to separate meat from remaining cooking liquid.
    > > Use separator funnel to remove fat from cooking liquie. Combine meat,
    > > cooking liquid and tomatoes in sauce pan. *Slowly warm so sauce ebulates
    > > only slightly. Cook partially covered for 3 hours, adding water if too much
    > > evaporation occurs. .

    >
    > what does 'ebulates' mean? *google was not much help.
    >

    From the context and stem you'd have to guess it's 'boils' or
    'bubbles'. From Latin ebullire ‘boil up’ as is 'ebullient.' -
    aem

  11. #11
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe


    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Aug 9, 8:33 am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 16:34:27 -0700, Theron wrote:
    > > I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's tasty
    > > with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome thoughts.

    > [snip ingredients]
    > > Brown onion, dried provencial herbs and dried oregano lightly for 5
    > > minutes;
    > > add celery and cook another five minutes. Add sausage, and saute
    > > lightly,
    > > only until the meat loses color. Add milk and simmer 10 minutes,
    > > reducing
    > > milk by about 75%. Add wine and let wine-milk simmer until almost
    > > absorbed,
    > > leaving about a cup. Strain to separate meat from remaining cooking
    > > liquid.
    > > Use separator funnel to remove fat from cooking liquie. Combine meat,
    > > cooking liquid and tomatoes in sauce pan. Slowly warm so sauce ebulates
    > > only slightly. Cook partially covered for 3 hours, adding water if too
    > > much
    > > evaporation occurs. .

    >
    > what does 'ebulates' mean? google was not much help.
    >

    From the context and stem you'd have to guess it's 'boils' or
    'bubbles'. From Latin ebullire ‘boil up’ as is 'ebullient.' -
    aem
    >
    >

    I did mispell it. It should have been: ebulliate To boil or to bubble up. I
    have been mispelling it all these years.

    a fine ebullience,

    Ed






  12. #12
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Steve Pope wrote:
    > Jean B. <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Please report on the boar. Here when restaurants use that term I
    >> think it is just pork.

    >
    > Well, certainly it's pork, it's from a pig, but that pig should be
    > of the species _sus scrofa_ instead of _sus domesticus_ .
    >
    > I'm part way through making this ragu. The boar is very good,
    > but I would say no better than the same farmer's normal pork.
    > It's just what he was selling today. Oddly, it's a little
    > paler in color than the normal stuff.
    >
    > Steve


    I did mean domestic pig/pork. Thanks for that info. It seems
    there is no reason then to search for boar--unless one actually
    finds wild boar. I can get good pork (at least some of the year).

    --
    Jean B.

  13. #13
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe


    "Jean B." ha scritto nel messaggio
    Steve Pope wrote:


    >> I'm part way through making this ragu. The boar is very good,>> but I
    >> would say no better than the same farmer's normal pork. >> It's just what
    >> he was selling today. Oddly, it's a little>> paler in color than the
    >> normal stuff.

    >
    > I did mean domestic pig/pork. Thanks for that info. It seems > there is
    > no reason then to search for boar--unless one actually > finds wild boar.
    > I can get good pork (at least some of the year).


    I have some in the freezer right now. It is much leaner and darker than
    domestic pork, but I confess I have always wondered if the vast difference
    in dishes is not the handling as much as the meat. The best I ever had was
    cooked by a Chilean girl who has lived here a long time but had never made
    wild boar before. Her description of what she did sounded French, all the
    ingredients were Italian and the cook was South American. Fusion works!
    She has only the vaguest description to offer of what she did.
    Wild pork here is always spiced in a very ancient manner and always cooked
    very slow and long. You can buy it at certain vendors or if you know one of
    the official hunters you are given some. If you sat in my garden late at
    night with a big gun you could shoot the five that wreck it periodically.



  14. #14
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Theron wrote:

    > I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's
    > tasty with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome
    > thoughts.
    > 1 medium onion, chopped - 1 cup
    > 3 stalks celery, chopped - 1 cup
    > 1 1/2 lb bulk Italian Sausage
    > 1 1/2 Cups milk
    > 1 1/2 C white wine
    > 2 C canned diced tomatoes
    > 1 TB dried provencial herbs
    > 1 TB dried oregano
    > salt and pepper to taste.


    I usually make a similar ragu', but I use plain sausage (just meat, fat,
    salt & pepper, no spices or herbs) and a ground lean cut of beef. The rest
    of the ingredients is almost the same, as is the method.

    > Toss to your liking with pasta. We like fresh linguini, which we
    > fortunately can obtain readily here. Top with grated cheese of
    > choice. Serve with garlic bread.


    Linguine are a good choice for a ragu' like this. My other options for ragu'
    are:
    - any other pasta format
    - rice, adding the ragu' at 2-3 minutes before removing from fire
    - over polenta
    - over bread as a kind of warm snack
    - over pizza. I'm the only one doing it here, and some pizzaioli refuse do
    to it even if they have ragu' at hand for other dishes. Some pizzaioli who I
    asked "pizza al ragu'" got really pissed by my request, LOL
    --
    Vilco
    Mai guardare Trailer park Boys senza
    qualcosa da bere a portata di mano




  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Sun, 9 Aug 2009 10:25:35 -0700, Theron wrote:

    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > On Aug 9, 8:33 am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >> On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 16:34:27 -0700, Theron wrote:
    >>> I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's tasty
    >>> with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome thoughts.

    >> [snip ingredients]
    >>> Brown onion, dried provencial herbs and dried oregano lightly for 5
    >>> minutes;
    >>> add celery and cook another five minutes. Add sausage, and saute
    >>> lightly,
    >>> only until the meat loses color. Add milk and simmer 10 minutes,
    >>> reducing
    >>> milk by about 75%. Add wine and let wine-milk simmer until almost
    >>> absorbed,
    >>> leaving about a cup. Strain to separate meat from remaining cooking
    >>> liquid.
    >>> Use separator funnel to remove fat from cooking liquie. Combine meat,
    >>> cooking liquid and tomatoes in sauce pan. Slowly warm so sauce ebulates
    >>> only slightly. Cook partially covered for 3 hours, adding water if too
    >>> much
    >>> evaporation occurs. .

    >>
    >> what does 'ebulates' mean? google was not much help.
    >>

    > From the context and stem you'd have to guess it's 'boils' or
    > 'bubbles'. From Latin ebullire ‘boil up’ as is 'ebullient.' -
    > aem
    >>
    >>

    > I did mispell it. It should have been: ebulliate To boil or to bubble up. I
    > have been mispelling it all these years.
    >
    > a fine ebullience,
    >
    > Ed


    o.k., 'ebullience' i know, and the meaning was pretty clear from the
    context. but i like to keep an eye on these things because english is
    sneaky and devious, so you gotta watch it every second.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    On Mon, 10 Aug 2009 08:24:05 +0200, Giusi wrote:

    > "Jean B." ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Steve Pope wrote:
    >
    >>> I'm part way through making this ragu. The boar is very good,>> but I
    >>> would say no better than the same farmer's normal pork. >> It's just what
    >>> he was selling today. Oddly, it's a little>> paler in color than the
    >>> normal stuff.

    >>
    >> I did mean domestic pig/pork. Thanks for that info. It seems > there is
    >> no reason then to search for boar--unless one actually > finds wild boar.
    >> I can get good pork (at least some of the year).

    >
    > I have some in the freezer right now. It is much leaner and darker than
    > domestic pork, but I confess I have always wondered if the vast difference
    > in dishes is not the handling as much as the meat. The best I ever had was
    > cooked by a Chilean girl who has lived here a long time but had never made
    > wild boar before. Her description of what she did sounded French, all the
    > ingredients were Italian and the cook was South American. Fusion works!
    > She has only the vaguest description to offer of what she did.
    > Wild pork here is always spiced in a very ancient manner and always cooked
    > very slow and long. You can buy it at certain vendors or if you know one of
    > the official hunters you are given some. If you sat in my garden late at
    > night with a big gun you could shoot the five that wreck it periodically.


    the swine!

    your pal,
    blake

  17. #17
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have some in the freezer right now. It is much leaner and darker than
    > domestic pork, but I confess I have always wondered if the vast difference
    > in dishes is not the handling as much as the meat.


    Yes, exactly. It is a relatively mild-tasting meat, especially if
    young, and one can actually use many pork recipes unchanged.

    I once posted a funny story by Edouard de Pomiane about game dishes
    having to be marinated to be believed to be game at all.

    Victor

  18. #18
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    Giusi wrote:
    > I have some in the freezer right now. It is much leaner and darker than
    > domestic pork, but I confess I have always wondered if the vast difference
    > in dishes is not the handling as much as the meat. The best I ever had was
    > cooked by a Chilean girl who has lived here a long time but had never made
    > wild boar before. Her description of what she did sounded French, all the
    > ingredients were Italian and the cook was South American. Fusion works!
    > She has only the vaguest description to offer of what she did.
    > Wild pork here is always spiced in a very ancient manner and always cooked
    > very slow and long. You can buy it at certain vendors or if you know one of
    > the official hunters you are given some. If you sat in my garden late at
    > night with a big gun you could shoot the five that wreck it periodically.
    >
    >

    Good point re the cooking method. Now I wish I was there to try
    this dish!

    --
    Jean B.

  19. #19
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe

    In article <1j499g3.19ltak418hvlc6N%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > Giusi <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I have some in the freezer right now. It is much leaner and darker than
    > > domestic pork, but I confess I have always wondered if the vast difference
    > > in dishes is not the handling as much as the meat.

    >
    > Yes, exactly. It is a relatively mild-tasting meat, especially if
    > young, and one can actually use many pork recipes unchanged.
    >
    > I once posted a funny story by Edouard de Pomiane about game dishes
    > having to be marinated to be believed to be game at all.
    >
    > Victor


    This is interesting to hear. Despite a long lifetime in Northern
    California, I have never tasted the wild boar/feral pigs that are so
    common here. (There is no closed season.) On the contrary, I have have
    had many samples of venison taken from the same regions and they are
    usually quite gamey. Different diets?? I would guess the pigs are
    delicious when taken in the Fall as there are plentiful acorns around
    the region then. I would like to prepare some in a Dalmatian pasticada.

  20. #20
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Sauce Bolognese Recipe


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1h8k15xigiy89$.1a70i75gr3sb9$.[email protected] ..
    > On Sun, 9 Aug 2009 10:25:35 -0700, Theron wrote:
    >
    >> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> On Aug 9, 8:33 am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 8 Aug 2009 16:34:27 -0700, Theron wrote:
    >>>> I just made a tasty Bolognese Sauce. Nothing profound, though it's
    >>>> tasty
    >>>> with a good bulk sausage rather than beef or veal. I'd welcome
    >>>> thoughts.
    >>> [snip ingredients]
    >>>> Brown onion, dried provencial herbs and dried oregano lightly for 5
    >>>> minutes;
    >>>> add celery and cook another five minutes. Add sausage, and saute
    >>>> lightly,
    >>>> only until the meat loses color. Add milk and simmer 10 minutes,
    >>>> reducing
    >>>> milk by about 75%. Add wine and let wine-milk simmer until almost
    >>>> absorbed,
    >>>> leaving about a cup. Strain to separate meat from remaining cooking
    >>>> liquid.
    >>>> Use separator funnel to remove fat from cooking liquie. Combine meat,
    >>>> cooking liquid and tomatoes in sauce pan. Slowly warm so sauce ebulates
    >>>> only slightly. Cook partially covered for 3 hours, adding water if too
    >>>> much
    >>>> evaporation occurs. .
    >>>
    >>> what does 'ebulates' mean? google was not much help.
    >>>

    >> From the context and stem you'd have to guess it's 'boils' or
    >> 'bubbles'. From Latin ebullire 'boil up' as is 'ebullient.' -
    >> aem
    >>>
    >>>

    >> I did mispell it. It should have been: ebulliate To boil or to bubble up.
    >> I
    >> have been mispelling it all these years.
    >>
    >> a fine ebullience,
    >>
    >> Ed

    >
    > o.k., 'ebullience' i know, and the meaning was pretty clear from the
    > context. but i like to keep an eye on these things because english is
    > sneaky and devious, so you gotta watch it every second.
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake
    >
    >

    Thanks so much for pointing this out! That's what Usenet is all about. I
    can't imagine who, amongst those I am surrounded by, would have straightened
    me out.
    Thanks again,

    Ed






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