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Thread: Salisbury Steak

  1. #1
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Salisbury Steak


    Do you like Salisbury Steak, and if so, do you make it at home?

    It is a lot like meatloaf in a way, for that fact that there are many
    recipes for it, and mostly it always turns out good, so is just a matter
    of preference when it comes to the ingredients being used.

    Yesterday I thawed out 1-1/2 lbs. of super lean ground beef, not knowing
    for sure exactly what I would do with it, as have many favorite ways to
    utilize it. The more I thought about it, I decided I wanted Salisbury
    Steak, as it has been awhile. I checked out several recipes, but (1)
    they didn't appeal to me, or (2) I was missing at least one ingredient
    called for, so made my own and they were a hit with hubby and DD, who I
    had invited to come eat supper with us.

    Salisbury Steak - The Alaskan Way

    Mixed together in a bowl:
    1-1/2 lbs. lean beef
    1 large egg, beaten
    3/4 cup dry bread crumbs
    1/3 cup minced onion
    1/3 cup minced celery
    Seasoned salt & seasoned pepper, to taste
    Few dashes garlic powder

    Shaped into 7 oval patties and browned in hot oil; drain.

    In the meantime, cooked 8 oz. fresh sliced mushrooms in a little butter
    till softened. In small bowl, mixed 1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce with 1
    jar beef gravy and added the mushrooms. Poured over the patties and
    simmered for about a half hour covered.

    The sauce was wonderful over mashed potatoes, so was pleased with my
    accomplishment, and everybody was happy! :-D

    Judy


  2. #2
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 7, 12:37*pm, jhaff...@webtv.net (Judy Haffner) wrote:
    > Do you like Salisbury Steak, and if so, do you make it at home?
    >
    > It is a lot like meatloaf in a way, for that fact that there are many
    > recipes for it, and mostly it always turns out good, so is just a matter
    > of preference when it comes to the ingredients being used.
    >
    > Yesterday I thawed out 1-1/2 lbs. of super lean ground beef, not knowing
    > for sure exactly what I would do with it, as have many favorite ways to
    > utilize it. The more I thought about it, I decided I wanted Salisbury
    > Steak, as it has been awhile. I checked out several recipes, but (1)
    > they didn't appeal to me, or (2) I was missing at least one ingredient
    > called for, so made my own and they were a hit with hubby and DD, who I
    > had invited to come eat supper with us.
    >
    > Salisbury Steak - The Alaskan Way
    >
    > Mixed together in a bowl:
    > 1-1/2 lbs. lean beef
    > 1 large egg, beaten
    > 3/4 cup dry bread crumbs
    > 1/3 cup minced onion
    > 1/3 cup minced celery
    > Seasoned salt & seasoned pepper, to taste
    > Few dashes garlic powder
    >
    > Shaped into 7 oval patties and browned in hot oil; drain.
    >
    > In the meantime, cooked 8 oz. fresh sliced mushrooms in a little butter
    > till softened. In small bowl, mixed 1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce with 1
    > jar *beef gravy and added the mushrooms. Poured over the patties and
    > simmered for about a half hour covered.
    >
    > The sauce was wonderful over mashed potatoes, so was pleased with my
    > accomplishment, and everybody was happy! :-D
    >
    > Judy


    I've never made Salisbury steak. I tend to make meat loaf whenever I
    get the desire for a ground beef type dish. Your recipe sounds very
    good.
    Now, why do they call it Salisbury steak? Good ole' Zimbabwe used to
    be called Rhodesia, and the capital city was Salisbury. Is that why?
    I suppose I could google, but my philosophy is: 'when all else fails,
    google.'
    Speaking of ground beef, I have some left over sour cream. Tomorrow,
    I'm going to make a meat ball stroganoff. Have you recommendations
    for the meatball ingredients? I was thinking of just ground beef,
    some worcestershire sauce, bread crumbs, and an egg. Simple. Maybe
    I'll add some very fine chopped onions, and garlic to the mix. I want
    to make a dish that even the ghost of Count Stroganoff would be proud
    to serve at his dacha on the lake.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 7, 9:37*am, jhaff...@webtv.net (Judy Haffner) wrote:
    > Do you like Salisbury Steak, and if so, do you make it at home?
    >
    > It is a lot like meatloaf in a way, for that fact that there are many
    > recipes for it, and mostly it always turns out good, so is just a matter
    > of preference when it comes to the ingredients being used.
    >
    > Yesterday I thawed out 1-1/2 lbs. of super lean ground beef, not knowing
    > for sure exactly what I would do with it, as have many favorite ways to
    > utilize it. The more I thought about it, I decided I wanted Salisbury
    > Steak, as it has been awhile. I checked out several recipes, but (1)
    > they didn't appeal to me, or (2) I was missing at least one ingredient
    > called for, so made my own and they were a hit with hubby and DD, who I
    > had invited to come eat supper with us.
    >
    > Salisbury Steak - The Alaskan Way
    >
    > Mixed together in a bowl:
    > 1-1/2 lbs. lean beef
    > 1 large egg, beaten
    > 3/4 cup dry bread crumbs
    > 1/3 cup minced onion
    > 1/3 cup minced celery
    > Seasoned salt & seasoned pepper, to taste
    > Few dashes garlic powder
    >
    > Shaped into 7 oval patties and browned in hot oil; drain.
    >
    > In the meantime, cooked 8 oz. fresh sliced mushrooms in a little butter
    > till softened. In small bowl, mixed 1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce with 1
    > jar *beef gravy and added the mushrooms. Poured over the patties and
    > simmered for about a half hour covered.
    >
    > The sauce was wonderful over mashed potatoes, so was pleased with my
    > accomplishment, and everybody was happy! :-D
    >
    > Judy


    here's my favoarite recipe.....you can use a salisbury steak ground
    beef mixture or use those cube steaks......I always prefer the cube
    steaks.

    http://www.hizzoners.com/recipes/mea...ed-onion-gravy

    you can add mushrooms to the gravy as well, play with it however
    suits your fancy.


  4. #4
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 7, 11:37*am, jhaff...@webtv.net (Judy Haffner) wrote:
    > Do you like Salisbury Steak, and if so, do you make it at home?
    >
    > It is a lot like meatloaf in a way, for that fact that there are many
    > recipes for it, and mostly it always turns out good, so is just a matter
    > of preference when it comes to the ingredients being used.
    >
    > Yesterday I thawed out 1-1/2 lbs. of super lean ground beef, not knowing
    > for sure exactly what I would do with it, as have many favorite ways to
    > utilize it. The more I thought about it, I decided I wanted Salisbury
    > Steak, as it has been awhile. I checked out several recipes, but (1)
    > they didn't appeal to me, or (2) I was missing at least one ingredient
    > called for, so made my own and they were a hit with hubby and DD, who I
    > had invited to come eat supper with us.
    >
    > Salisbury Steak - The Alaskan Way
    >
    > Mixed together in a bowl:
    > 1-1/2 lbs. lean beef
    > 1 large egg, beaten
    > 3/4 cup dry bread crumbs
    > 1/3 cup minced onion
    > 1/3 cup minced celery
    > Seasoned salt & seasoned pepper, to taste
    > Few dashes garlic powder
    >
    > Shaped into 7 oval patties and browned in hot oil; drain.
    >
    > In the meantime, cooked 8 oz. fresh sliced mushrooms in a little butter
    > till softened. In small bowl, mixed 1 (8 oz.) can tomato sauce with 1
    > jar *beef gravy and added the mushrooms. Poured over the patties and
    > simmered for about a half hour covered.
    >
    > The sauce was wonderful over mashed potatoes, so was pleased with my
    > accomplishment, and everybody was happy! :-D
    >
    > Judy


    It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    sauce with lots of mushrooms.

    N.

    N.

  5. #5
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak


    ImStillMags wrote:

    >here's my favoarite recipe.....you can use
    > a salisbury steak ground beef mixture or
    > use those cube steaks......I always
    > prefer the cube steaks.


    >http://www.hizzoners.com/recipes/meats
    >/247-country-style-steak-with-caramelize
    >d-onion-gravy


    >you can add mushrooms to the gravy as
    > well, play with it however suits your
    >fancy.


    This sounds really good, so I will copy off the recipe. I have made
    Salisbury Steak before using onions in the gravy, but I might try this
    recipe with the cube steak.

    We like mushrooms, so add them to a lot of main dishes.

    One of my favorite ways to fix cube steaks is to coat them with a
    mixture of about 1/4 cup flour, 1-1/2 tsp. salt, 1/8 tsp. pepper and 2
    tsp. dry mustard. Brown in oil, reserving flour mixture. Remove meat and
    put remaining flour mixture back in skillet with the drippings, adding 2
    cups water and 1 tbsp. Worcestershire Sauce. Cook and stir till mixed
    well. Put meat back in the sauce; cover and simmer for 1-1/2 hours.
    Check occasionally to make sure water doesn't boil away, as may need to
    add more. I also have baked this in the oven for the same length of
    time. If I have fresh mushrooms on hand, I'll slice them and add too.
    The gravy from this is delicious!

    Judy


  6. #6
    Judy Haffner Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak


    A Moose in Love wrote:

    >I've never made Salisbury steak. I tend
    > to make meat loaf whenever I get the
    > desire for a ground beef type dish. Your
    > recipe sounds very good.


    >Now, why do they call it Salisbury steak?
    > Good ole' Zimbabwe used to be called
    > Rhodesia, and the capital city was
    > Salisbury. Is that why? I suppose I could
    > google, but my philosophy is: 'when all
    > else fails, google.'


    >Speaking of ground beef, I have some
    > left over sour cream. Tomorrow, I'm
    > going to make a meat ball stroganoff.
    > Have you recommendations for the
    > meatball ingredients? I was thinking of
    > just ground beef, some worcestershire
    > sauce, bread crumbs, and an egg.
    > Simple. Maybe I'll add some very fine
    > chopped onions, and garlic to the mix. I
    > want to make a dish that even the ghost
    > of Count Stroganoff would be proud to
    > serve at his dacha on the lake.


    I never have researched why it's called Salisbury Steak, as guess I just
    never thought about it before, but...now I'm curious! I bet if you
    tried it, you would like it?

    I think you can put almost anything in meatballs and they'll be tasty.
    Sometimes simple is better, but the last time I made them, I used 1 lb.
    super lean ground beef and added 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs, 1/3 cup
    minced onion, 1/4 cup milk, 1 egg, 1 tbsp. minced parsley, 1 tsp. salt
    (or to taste) 1/2 tsp. pepper and 1 tbsp. A-1 sauce and hubby liked
    them. I don't make meatballs all that often, so am no expert, but I
    think you're ideas sound real good.

    Judy


  7. #7
    Lou Decruss Guest

  8. #8
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    Lou Decruss wrote:

    >>One of my favorite ways to fix cube steaks

    >
    >Why do you buy broken steaks?


    If you were drunk when you posted that, admit it now and all will be
    forgiven.


  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Wed, 07 Mar 2012 22:44:10 -0500, George M. Middius wrote:

    > Lou Decruss wrote:
    >
    >>>One of my favorite ways to fix cube steaks

    >>
    >>Why do you buy broken steaks?

    >
    > If you were drunk when you posted that, admit it now and all will be
    > forgiven.


    A "steak" of any kind should not need to be cubed. There is no way to
    fix it.

    But I will bow down o the old fashioned way of mutilating beef to make
    it edible, for RFC's sake. I prefer my cheap meat swissed.

    -sw

  10. #10
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak


    "George M. Middius" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Lou Decruss wrote:
    >
    >>>One of my favorite ways to fix cube steaks

    >>
    >>Why do you buy broken steaks?

    >
    > If you were drunk when you posted that, admit it now and all will be
    > forgiven.


    Well maybe they weren't broken but it sure sounded like it because *drum
    roll* she had to fix them.



  11. #11
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 7, 9:43*pm, jhaff...@webtv.net (Judy Haffner) wrote:
    > A Moose in Love wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >I've never made Salisbury steak. I tend
    > > to make meat loaf whenever I get the
    > > desire for a ground beef type dish. Your
    > > recipe sounds very good.
    > >Now, why do they call it Salisbury steak?
    > > Good ole' Zimbabwe used to be called
    > > Rhodesia, and the capital city was
    > > Salisbury. Is that why? I suppose I could
    > > google, but my philosophy is: 'when all
    > > else fails, google.'
    > >Speaking of ground beef, I have some
    > > left over sour cream. Tomorrow, I'm
    > > going to make a meat ball stroganoff.
    > > Have you recommendations for the
    > > meatball ingredients? I was thinking of
    > > just ground beef, some worcestershire
    > > sauce, bread crumbs, and an egg.
    > > Simple. Maybe I'll add some very fine
    > > chopped onions, and garlic to the mix. I
    > > want to make a dish that even the ghost
    > > of Count Stroganoff would be proud to
    > > serve at his dacha on the lake.

    >
    > I never have researched why it's called Salisbury Steak, as guess I just
    > never thought about it before, but...now I'm curious! I bet if you
    > tried it, you would like it?
    >
    > I think you can put almost anything in meatballs and they'll be tasty.
    > Sometimes simple is better, but the last time I made them, I used 1 lb.
    > super lean ground beef and added 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs, 1/3 cup
    > minced onion, 1/4 cup milk, 1 egg, 1 tbsp. minced parsley, 1 tsp. salt
    > (or to taste) 1/2 tsp. pepper and 1 tbsp. A-1 sauce and hubby liked
    > them. I don't make meatballs all that often, so am no expert, but I
    > think *you're ideas sound real good.
    >
    > Judy


    Ahhh. A-1 sauce. That's an idea. I like it much better than
    HP(Houses of Parliament) sauce.

  12. #12
    A Moose in Love Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 7, 9:53*pm, Lou Decruss <LouDecr...@biteme.com> wrote:
    > On Wed, 7 Mar 2012 17:33:32 -0900, jhaff...@webtv.net (Judy Haffner)
    > wrote:
    >
    > >One of my favorite ways to fix cube steaks

    >
    > Why do you buy broken steaks?
    >
    > Lou


    I don't have much luck with cube steaks. They are made from a non
    tender cut of beef, and sometimes putting them through the machine in
    order to tenderize works, but sometimes there are tough spots left.
    However, when I lived in Toronto, the Dominion store in my
    neighbourhood sold something called frenched top sirloin. The steaks
    went through a machine that didn't quite cube it, but the process made
    the top sirloin much more tender. Top sirloin is usually not bad in
    the tenderness department, but there are a few spots in the meat that
    are kind of tough. One thing that I do whenever I buy top sirloin, is
    to cut the gristle out before cooking. There usually isn't much
    gristle, but there is some. I do the same for calves liver.
    Sometimes there are veins in there that need to be cut out prior to
    cooking.

  13. #13
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak


    "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    > we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    > sauce with lots of mushrooms.


    What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  14. #14
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On 3/8/2012 10:59 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >
    > "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    >> we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    >> sauce with lots of mushrooms.

    >
    > What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?
    >

    I've always assumed that it was Salisbury steak if it was formed into
    individual patties and cooked on the hob/stovetop, and meatloaf if it
    was a loaf and baked.
    Having said that, though, I've been making individual 'meatloaves' in a
    silicone cupcake pan - straight sided, and in between standard and
    'Texas' size. Perfect for batch cooking, they freeze and reheat well.

  15. #15
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak


    "S Viemeister" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 3/8/2012 10:59 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >>
    >> "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >>> It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    >>> we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    >>> sauce with lots of mushrooms.

    >>
    >> What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?
    >>

    > I've always assumed that it was Salisbury steak if it was formed into
    > individual patties and cooked on the hob/stovetop, and meatloaf if it was
    > a loaf and baked.
    > Having said that, though, I've been making individual 'meatloaves' in a
    > silicone cupcake pan - straight sided, and in between standard and
    > 'Texas' size. Perfect for batch cooking, they freeze and reheat well.


    Interesting, thanks, Shelia! Share you recipes for both?


    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  16. #16
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 7, 8:43*pm, jhaff...@webtv.net (Judy Haffner) wrote:
    > A Moose in Love wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >I've never made Salisbury steak. I tend
    > > to make meat loaf whenever I get the
    > > desire for a ground beef type dish. Your
    > > recipe sounds very good.
    > >Now, why do they call it Salisbury steak?
    > > Good ole' Zimbabwe used to be called
    > > Rhodesia, and the capital city was
    > > Salisbury. Is that why? I suppose I could
    > > google, but my philosophy is: 'when all
    > > else fails, google.'
    > >Speaking of ground beef, I have some
    > > left over sour cream. Tomorrow, I'm
    > > going to make a meat ball stroganoff.
    > > Have you recommendations for the
    > > meatball ingredients? I was thinking of
    > > just ground beef, some worcestershire
    > > sauce, bread crumbs, and an egg.
    > > Simple. Maybe I'll add some very fine
    > > chopped onions, and garlic to the mix. I
    > > want to make a dish that even the ghost
    > > of Count Stroganoff would be proud to
    > > serve at his dacha on the lake.

    >
    > I never have researched why it's called Salisbury Steak, as guess I just
    > never thought about it before, but...now I'm curious! I bet if you
    > tried it, you would like it?
    >
    > I think you can put almost anything in meatballs and they'll be tasty.
    > Sometimes simple is better, but the last time I made them, I used 1 lb.
    > super lean ground beef and added 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs, 1/3 cup
    > minced onion, 1/4 cup milk, 1 egg, 1 tbsp. minced parsley, 1 tsp. salt
    > (or to taste) 1/2 tsp. pepper and 1 tbsp. A-1 sauce and hubby liked
    > them. I don't make meatballs all that often, so am no expert, but I
    > think *you're ideas sound real good.
    >
    > Judy


    I think the name may have had something to do with a hotel, but I
    could be wrong about that. I didn't look it up.

    N.

  17. #17
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On Mar 8, 9:59*am, "Ophelia" <Ophe...@Elsinore.me.uk> wrote:
    > "Nancy2" <ellorysg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    > > we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - * It was more just a white
    > > sauce with lots of mushrooms.

    >
    > What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?
    >
    > --http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


    Most meatloaf I've seen, made or eaten doesn't have a white-type
    mushroom sauce, and it is baked in a loaf, not in individual patties.
    That's kind of a silly question. Also, my Salisbury steak doesn't
    have anything in it except seasonings. Meatloaf has other stuff like
    onion, celery, etc.

    N.

  18. #18
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    >> we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    >> sauce with lots of mushrooms.

    >
    >What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?


    In my house a Salisbury steak [called "Dr. Salisbury's Steak' as late
    as 1975 by my ex's dad] is a portion sized deal that gets fried and
    buried in gravy. [IMO so it can be choked down- too much 'crust
    compared to moist center.]

    A meatloaf is a family sized chunk of meat [I like to use 3-4 pounds
    of meat] that gets baked, stays moist, and may or may not be served
    with a bit of gravy.

    Jim

  19. #19
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak


    "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Mar 8, 9:59 am, "Ophelia" <Ophe...@Elsinore.me.uk> wrote:
    >> "Nancy2" <ellorysg...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> > It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    >> > we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    >> > sauce with lots of mushrooms.

    >>
    >> What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?

    >
    > Most meatloaf I've seen, made or eaten doesn't have a white-type
    > mushroom sauce, and it is baked in a loaf, not in individual patties.
    > That's kind of a silly question. Also, my Salisbury steak doesn't
    > have anything in it except seasonings. Meatloaf has other stuff like
    > onion, celery, etc.


    Thank you So really, is it like hamburger? I have only tried to make
    meatloaf twice and we didn't like it. Do you have any hints as to what
    would be a good one to make?

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  20. #20
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Salisbury Steak

    On 3/8/2012 11:27 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    > <[email protected]> wrote
    >> On 3/8/2012 10:59 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote
    >>>> It looks like what I had back in the day, as Salsibury Steak, although
    >>>> we never had tomato sauce in the gravy - It was more just a white
    >>>> sauce with lots of mushrooms.
    >>>
    >>> What is the difference between Salisbury Steak and Meatloaf?
    >>>

    >> I've always assumed that it was Salisbury steak if it was formed into
    >> individual patties and cooked on the hob/stovetop, and meatloaf if it
    >> was a loaf and baked.
    >> Having said that, though, I've been making individual 'meatloaves' in
    >> a silicone cupcake pan - straight sided, and in between standard and
    >> 'Texas' size. Perfect for batch cooking, they freeze and reheat well.

    >
    > Interesting, thanks, Shelia! Share you recipes for both?
    >

    Not so much a recipe - more a 'what do I have in the kitchen today?'
    sort of thing! Next time I do it, I should stop and weigh things, and
    write it down. I can give you an approximation though.

    I also have what I call 'Cheater's Meatloaf', which I wrote for my
    daughter, who works long hours and doesn't have time or a fully stocked
    kitchen. It uses store cupboard shortcuts.


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