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Thread: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

  1. #1
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the big
    box store and the like? Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    Anyone know?

    I think I remember once being in Costco and there not being any raw chickens
    in the poultry cooler case and being told that there had been a run on
    chickens for some special event and the deli had to raid the store chickens.


    Janet



  2. #2
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the big
    > box store and the like? Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    > delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    > Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    > tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    > Anyone know?
    >
    > I think I remember once being in Costco and there not being any raw chickens
    > in the poultry cooler case and being told that there had been a run on
    > chickens for some special event and the deli had to raid the store chickens.
    >
    >
    > Janet
    >
    >


    Janet - Not sure of the point you are making since the local store I
    shop at just puts a rub on the chickens they do in the rotisserie manner.

    If they needed to go outside the planned number of daily chickens to
    using the chickens meant for wholesale, that does not indicate to me
    something weird.

    Bob

  3. #3
    aem Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    On Aug 25, 10:56*am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    > You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the big
    > box store and the like?


    I've bought two of them, at two supermarkets. Both were woefully dry
    and overcooked, though the (I think) dry rub seasoning was flavorful.
    Gave up trying. Instead, when I don't feel like roasting or grilling
    my own, which is not often, I buy from El Pollo Loco. I think the
    supermarket is cheaper, but El Pollo Loco is usually pretty good.

    >*Who does the preparation on the birds? *Are they
    > delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? *Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    > Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? *All brined and
    > tied? *Do they come frozen? *Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    > Anyone know?


    I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.

    I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    okay product.
    -aem

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    > You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the big
    > box store and the like? Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    > delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    > Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    > tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?


    I'm sure that most stores prep their own. There *may* be a source
    for pre-prepared chickens, but I couldn't find any doing a quick
    search of some likely commercial food suppliers. I didn't look hard.

    I did find lots of places selling rubs for making rotisserie chicken,
    so I suspect most places just buy large quatities of fryers and
    apply a rub.

    Bill Ranck
    Blacksburg, Va.


  5. #5
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?


    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:h71bbi$nt9$[email protected]..
    > Janet Bostwick <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the
    >> big
    >> box store and the like? Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    >> delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie
    >> Chicken
    >> Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined
    >> and
    >> tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?

    >
    > I'm sure that most stores prep their own. There *may* be a source
    > for pre-prepared chickens, but I couldn't find any doing a quick
    > search of some likely commercial food suppliers. I didn't look hard.
    >
    > I did find lots of places selling rubs for making rotisserie chicken,
    > so I suspect most places just buy large quatities of fryers and
    > apply a rub.
    >


    Speaking of which, when I have bought these chickens they have a nasty taste
    from the rubs. Hard to describe, but nothing like home roasted chicken.



  6. #6
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?


    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Aug 25, 10:56 am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    > You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the
    > big
    > box store and the like?


    I've bought two of them, at two supermarkets. Both were woefully dry
    and overcooked, though the (I think) dry rub seasoning was flavorful.
    Gave up trying. Instead, when I don't feel like roasting or grilling
    my own, which is not often, I buy from El Pollo Loco. I think the
    supermarket is cheaper, but El Pollo Loco is usually pretty good.

    > Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    > delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    > Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    > tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    > Anyone know?


    I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.

    I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    okay product.
    -aem
    Costco has delicious rotisserie birds -- around 4 pounds for $4.99. I
    believe it says on the plastic dome that the bird is injected with a brine.
    I won't buy Albertson birds. They look really dry, are smaller and more
    expensive. Costco birds are always juicy. I have no complaints about them.
    I was just wondering if each store prepped their own birds. Most
    supermarket bakeries no longer make their own baked goods. They buy frozen
    or retarded dough and bake the stuff off in those tiered ovens on wheels.
    Supermarkets buy most of the salad bar stuff in tubs already cut up. So, I
    was wondering if buying already prepped applied to the chickens. And, I
    guess also in the back of my mind I was wondering about sanitation and
    safety.
    Janet



  7. #7
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > On Aug 25, 10:56 am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    >> You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the
    >> big
    >> box store and the like?

    >
    > I've bought two of them, at two supermarkets. Both were woefully dry
    > and overcooked, though the (I think) dry rub seasoning was flavorful.
    > Gave up trying. Instead, when I don't feel like roasting or grilling
    > my own, which is not often, I buy from El Pollo Loco. I think the
    > supermarket is cheaper, but El Pollo Loco is usually pretty good.
    >
    >> Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    >> delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    >> Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    >> tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    >> Anyone know?

    >
    > I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    > be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    > throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    > produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.
    >
    > I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    > okay product.
    > -aem
    > Costco has delicious rotisserie birds -- around 4 pounds for $4.99. I
    > believe it says on the plastic dome that the bird is injected with a brine.
    > I won't buy Albertson birds. They look really dry, are smaller and more
    > expensive. Costco birds are always juicy. I have no complaints about them.
    > I was just wondering if each store prepped their own birds. Most
    > supermarket bakeries no longer make their own baked goods. They buy frozen
    > or retarded dough and bake the stuff off in those tiered ovens on wheels.
    > Supermarkets buy most of the salad bar stuff in tubs already cut up. So, I
    > was wondering if buying already prepped applied to the chickens. And, I
    > guess also in the back of my mind I was wondering about sanitation and
    > safety.
    > Janet
    >
    >


    Good and relevant point. I know that Costco has a good rotisserie bird.
    So does the local store I mostly shop at. But I would not assume other
    stores all have the same quality of product.

    Bob

  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:41:45 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    >okay product.


    Shop early in the day to ensure you get one that hasn't been sitting
    under the warming lights for hours.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  9. #9
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:26:42 -0400, Bob Muncie <[email protected]> wrote:

    -->Janet Bostwick wrote:
    -->> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    -->> news:[email protected]...
    -->> On Aug 25, 10:56 am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    -->>> You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the
    -->>> big
    -->>> box store and the like?
    -->>
    -->> I've bought two of them, at two supermarkets. Both were woefully dry
    -->> and overcooked, though the (I think) dry rub seasoning was flavorful.
    -->> Gave up trying. Instead, when I don't feel like roasting or grilling
    -->> my own, which is not often, I buy from El Pollo Loco. I think the
    -->> supermarket is cheaper, but El Pollo Loco is usually pretty good.
    -->>
    -->>> Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    -->>> delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    -->>> Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    -->>> tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    -->>> Anyone know?
    -->>
    -->> I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    -->> be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    -->> throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    -->> produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.
    -->>
    -->> I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    -->> okay product.
    -->> -aem
    -->> Costco has delicious rotisserie birds -- around 4 pounds for $4.99. I
    -->> believe it says on the plastic dome that the bird is injected with a brine.
    -->> I won't buy Albertson birds. They look really dry, are smaller and more
    -->> expensive. Costco birds are always juicy. I have no complaints about them.
    -->> I was just wondering if each store prepped their own birds. Most
    -->> supermarket bakeries no longer make their own baked goods. They buy frozen
    -->> or retarded dough and bake the stuff off in those tiered ovens on wheels.
    -->> Supermarkets buy most of the salad bar stuff in tubs already cut up. So, I
    -->> was wondering if buying already prepped applied to the chickens. And, I
    -->> guess also in the back of my mind I was wondering about sanitation and
    -->> safety.
    -->> Janet
    -->>
    -->>
    -->
    -->Good and relevant point. I know that Costco has a good rotisserie bird.
    -->So does the local store I mostly shop at. But I would not assume other
    -->stores all have the same quality of product.
    -->
    -->Bob

    Don't forget Costco's large continer of ready to eat chicken wings and drummys
    for $10

  10. #10
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    Stu wrote:
    > On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:26:42 -0400, Bob Muncie <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > -->Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > -->> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > -->> news:[email protected]...
    > -->> On Aug 25, 10:56 am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    > -->>> You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the
    > -->>> big
    > -->>> box store and the like?
    > -->>
    > -->> I've bought two of them, at two supermarkets. Both were woefully dry
    > -->> and overcooked, though the (I think) dry rub seasoning was flavorful.
    > -->> Gave up trying. Instead, when I don't feel like roasting or grilling
    > -->> my own, which is not often, I buy from El Pollo Loco. I think the
    > -->> supermarket is cheaper, but El Pollo Loco is usually pretty good.
    > -->>
    > -->>> Who does the preparation on the birds? Are they
    > -->>> delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    > -->>> Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? All brined and
    > -->>> tied? Do they come frozen? Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    > -->>> Anyone know?
    > -->>
    > -->> I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    > -->> be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    > -->> throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    > -->> produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.
    > -->>
    > -->> I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    > -->> okay product.
    > -->> -aem
    > -->> Costco has delicious rotisserie birds -- around 4 pounds for $4.99. I
    > -->> believe it says on the plastic dome that the bird is injected with a brine.
    > -->> I won't buy Albertson birds. They look really dry, are smaller and more
    > -->> expensive. Costco birds are always juicy. I have no complaints about them.
    > -->> I was just wondering if each store prepped their own birds. Most
    > -->> supermarket bakeries no longer make their own baked goods. They buy frozen
    > -->> or retarded dough and bake the stuff off in those tiered ovens on wheels.
    > -->> Supermarkets buy most of the salad bar stuff in tubs already cut up. So, I
    > -->> was wondering if buying already prepped applied to the chickens. And, I
    > -->> guess also in the back of my mind I was wondering about sanitation and
    > -->> safety.
    > -->> Janet
    > -->>
    > -->>
    > -->
    > -->Good and relevant point. I know that Costco has a good rotisserie bird.
    > -->So does the local store I mostly shop at. But I would not assume other
    > -->stores all have the same quality of product.
    > -->
    > -->Bob
    >
    > Don't forget Costco's large continer of ready to eat chicken wings and drummys
    > for $10


    I haven't seen that, but i would check it out if it were offered
    locally.. I like wings and drummies.

    Bob

  11. #11
    news Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:41:45 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that makes an
    >>okay product.

    >
    > Shop early in the day to ensure you get one that hasn't been sitting
    > under the warming lights for hours.


    Our Giant guarantees hot fresh ones from 5-7 PM or you get it free.
    They're good.



  12. #12
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?


    "Janet Bostwick" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] m...
    | ......
    | Supermarkets buy most of the salad bar stuff in tubs already cut up. So, I
    | was wondering if buying already prepped applied to the chickens. And, I
    | guess also in the back of my mind I was wondering about sanitation and
    | safety.
    | Janet
    | ......

    If you get to Costco early enough (just after 10 am here) you can see the
    meat people rolling the birds in the Secret Herbs and Spices before putting
    them in to rotate for a little while. That goes on throughout the day at
    obvious intervals, along with the ribs and other goodies. I know that Whole
    Foods fixes its own rotisserie chickens too, as does Publix. BTW if you
    get to Costco at that just-after-10 time slot you can usually get the tail ends
    of the racks of ribs that were cut off so the racks fit into the trays. They
    put them out just like they do any other food samples, and they don't last
    long.

    pavane



  13. #13
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    news wrote on Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:57:26 -0400:


    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:41:45 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that
    >>> makes an okay product.

    >>
    >> Shop early in the day to ensure you get one that hasn't been sitting
    >> under the warming lights for hours.


    >Our Giant guarantees hot fresh ones from 5-7 PM or you get it free.
    >They're good.


    I hate to admit it of Giant but their rotisserie chickens and turkey
    breasts are quite good.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  14. #14
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    James Silverton wrote:
    > news wrote on Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:57:26 -0400:
    >
    >
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:41:45 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that
    >>>> makes an okay product.
    >>>
    >>> Shop early in the day to ensure you get one that hasn't been sitting
    >>> under the warming lights for hours.

    >
    >> Our Giant guarantees hot fresh ones from 5-7 PM or you get it free.
    >> They're good.

    >
    > I hate to admit it of Giant but their rotisserie chickens and turkey
    > breasts are quite good.
    >
    >


    Why would you hate to admit it? :-)

    I often would not like to promote big business doing things right, but
    they do it so infrequently, I don't have a problem doing it.

    Bob


  15. #15
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    aem wrote:
    > On Aug 25, 10:56 am, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    >> You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket,
    >> the big box store and the like?

    >
    > I've bought two of them, at two supermarkets. Both were woefully dry
    > and overcooked, though the (I think) dry rub seasoning was flavorful.


    I had the same experience, except I found the seasoning to be
    very salty. I would buy them on occasion when I just wanted dinner
    on the table after work, the usual reason for rotisserie chickens.
    My inlaws bought them all the time because they were no longer
    interested in cooking.

    I have bought very good ones from Whole Foods.

    I never tried Costco's because I can just as easily make my own
    chicken, but they do look good. I've bought their chicken salad
    a few times, it's made from their (I assume) leftover rotisserie
    chickens and it's pretty tasty chicken.

    nancy

  16. #16
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    On Aug 25, 2:07*pm, "cyber****" <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    > Speaking of which, when I have bought these chickens they have a nasty taste
    > from the rubs. Hard to describe, but nothing like home roasted chicken.


    Like you know anything about home roasting a chicken, you no-talent
    smelly old bag of ****.

  17. #17
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    James Silverton said...

    > news wrote on Tue, 25 Aug 2009 15:57:26 -0400:
    >
    >
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:rde895hn7kgbpl5b[email protected]..
    >>> On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 11:41:45 -0700 (PDT), aem <[email protected]>
    >>> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I'd also be curious if anyone knows of a SoCal market that
    >>>> makes an okay product.
    >>>
    >>> Shop early in the day to ensure you get one that hasn't been sitting
    >>> under the warming lights for hours.

    >
    >>Our Giant guarantees hot fresh ones from 5-7 PM or you get it free.
    >>They're good.

    >
    > I hate to admit it of Giant but their rotisserie chickens and turkey
    > breasts are quite good.



    I got greater pleasure roasting my own birds. Trouble is I began to not
    favor the entire bird for dietary reasons.

    I'll always stop at the wholesale spit-roasting oven machine and watch 5
    birds x 10 spits chain driven across the flames. Never tried one.

    Baking is my way now. I've gotten the Jenny-O oven ready bake in the bag
    turkey breast once in awhile.

    Andy

  18. #18
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    On Aug 25, 12:56*pm, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    > You know those rotisserie chickens that you buy at the supermarket, the big
    > box store and the like? *Who does the preparation on the birds? *Are they
    > delivered in a vat of marinade to the store? *Is there a Rotisserie Chicken
    > Central that you order x number of cases of prepped birds? *All brined and
    > tied? *Do they come frozen? *Or does each store prep their own chickens?
    > Anyone know?
    >
    > I think I remember once being in Costco and there not being any raw chickens
    > in the poultry cooler case and being told that there had been a run on
    > chickens for some special event and the deli had to raid the store chickens.
    >
    > Janet


    I'm sure each store does their rotisserie chickens differently. When I
    worked for Straub's in the deli for about a month last year, Straub's
    got their chickens raw in a big box of chickens from the poultry
    plant, cleaned and ready to cook. I learned to take the rotisserie
    skewers and run them up the chicken's butts, and put 4 or 5 chickens
    on a skewer. And we tied the legs with a little oven safe plastic
    thing to keep them intact while baking. Then we sprinkled a generous
    amount of some seasoning mix all over them, and they were rotisserie-
    ready!

    John Kuthe...

  19. #19
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    Mark Thorson wrote:
    > aem wrote:
    >> I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    >> be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    >> throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    >> produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.

    >
    > Bingo!


    I'd believe in BINGO if I went to the old ladies group on Wednesdays..

    OTOH, if i saw proof that the stores did rotisserie based on the age of
    their chicken, I'd be willing to entertain the idea.\

    Any proof?

    Bob

  20. #20
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: rotisserie chicken - where does it come from?

    aem wrote:
    >
    > I don't know, but I've always assumed they were the store's about to
    > be out of date birds that they cooked up as a way to avoid having to
    > throw them away. Never occurred to me that they could be a centrally-
    > produced product. I'll be curious to see what others know.


    Bingo!

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