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Thread: roots of cooking?

  1. #1
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default roots of cooking?

    after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe design
    and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have been given by
    friends and family. I also learned my strengths and weakness for skills and
    what my inate talents are from the same group of people... so I am
    interested to hear more of people's journey to where they are today.

    Lee



  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    > started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    > design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have been
    > given by friends and family. I also learned my strengths and weakness for
    > skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of people... so I
    > am interested to hear more of people's journey to where they are today.


    My mother cooked a few things that were good. But the food was mostly the
    same and pretty bland. Most of the time we went out to eat. Now she pretty
    much always goes out to eat. I mostly didn't learn to cook from her but she
    did teach me a few things.



  3. #3
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    do you think eating out a lot as a child made you want to eat more at home
    or eat out? I ask because we rarely ate out when i was at home, it truly
    was a special event like a birthday or similar and i never ate at a fast
    food place until i was in my teens. this made me go through a phase where i
    wanted to eat out and never eat at home, but now i have come full circle and
    prefer to eat at home probably 99 percent of the time.
    Lee

    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:is4nsi$ddg$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    >> started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    >> design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have
    >> been given by friends and family. I also learned my strengths and
    >> weakness for skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of
    >> people... so I am interested to hear more of people's journey to where
    >> they are today.

    >
    > My mother cooked a few things that were good. But the food was mostly the
    > same and pretty bland. Most of the time we went out to eat. Now she
    > pretty much always goes out to eat. I mostly didn't learn to cook from
    > her but she did teach me a few things.
    >




  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > do you think eating out a lot as a child made you want to eat more at home
    > or eat out? I ask because we rarely ate out when i was at home, it truly
    > was a special event like a birthday or similar and i never ate at a fast
    > food place until i was in my teens. this made me go through a phase where
    > i wanted to eat out and never eat at home, but now i have come full circle
    > and prefer to eat at home probably 99 percent of the time.
    > Lee


    Well for the most part, eating out was better than my mom's cooking! But it
    did make me learn to cook. We didn't get fast food very often which was
    fine by me because I didn't like it. As a child I wouldn't eat burgers,
    fries, hotdogs...they didn't have chicken nuggets yet. I really hated
    pizza. So if they took us out for pizza I would then have a plain burger
    because it was the only choice they gave me.

    Mostly I got sick of being away from home. And it seemed we were always
    away from home! I took dance and swim lessons. I played the violin and was
    in honor orchestra. I was in scouts and choir at school. When I was older
    I did some sports, was in pep club and drama. Also Junior Achievement and I
    began working when I was 12.

    Saturday days were when my mom and I went grocery shopping. This involved
    going to at least two stores and there was lunch at the Safeway food
    counter. I believe they served lunch and dinner. If you wanted steak, you
    picked your own from the meat dept. and they cooked it for you.

    Sundays we went to church and then afterwards was either some sort of
    shopping extravaganza or we took a day trip. Sometimes we did day trips on
    Saturday. We also did things at the church on Wednesdays.

    Sometimes we took weekend trips and we were frequently pulled out of school
    for various vacations. We never flew anywhere but took car trips and once
    took a ferry into Canada. I hated those vacations because it meant doing
    school work in the car or motel.

    We also did quite a few camping trips either for the weekend or a week at a
    time. My mom did do some cooking then because there usually weren't
    restaurants around. Exception being the Boeing camping trips. They had
    cooks for those. I don't remember having any complaints with the food
    there.

    I just really got sick of being on the go all the time! I can remember
    begging to just stay home. But that rarely seemed to happen.

    Now one reason I like to dine out is that we can all get what we want to
    eat. It is very difficult for me to come up with any one meal that we all
    like. Angela loves chicken and that is pretty much the only meat she likes.
    I don't like it at all and husband is partial to beef. But he likes things
    like roast and steak and I can't digest those.

    Tonight I made Mexican food. Husband and daughter had chicken tacos (crisp
    shell) with beans, rice and some black olives. I had bean tacos with a very
    small amount of rice and a ton of extra shredded lettuce. Daughter loved it
    but I know husband would have preferred shredded beef and something spicier.

    I just don't like paying restaurant prices. We are pretty much down to
    going out for Friday dinner. Then lunch and dinner on Sundays because we go
    with my parents. My mom rarely cooks now and doesn't much like people using
    her kitchen. Once in a while I just put my foot down and go get prepared
    food somewhere like herbed chicken breasts and salad, but that winds up
    costing me more money than if we went out! Daughter doesn't usually like to
    go out to eat unless maybe she can get a milkshake.



  5. #5
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    interesting, thanks,

    Lee
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:is523p$4jn$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> do you think eating out a lot as a child made you want to eat more at
    >> home or eat out? I ask because we rarely ate out when i was at home, it
    >> truly was a special event like a birthday or similar and i never ate at a
    >> fast food place until i was in my teens. this made me go through a phase
    >> where i wanted to eat out and never eat at home, but now i have come full
    >> circle and prefer to eat at home probably 99 percent of the time.
    >> Lee

    >
    > Well for the most part, eating out was better than my mom's cooking! But
    > it did make me learn to cook. We didn't get fast food very often which
    > was fine by me because I didn't like it. As a child I wouldn't eat
    > burgers, fries, hotdogs...they didn't have chicken nuggets yet. I really
    > hated pizza. So if they took us out for pizza I would then have a plain
    > burger because it was the only choice they gave me.
    >
    > Mostly I got sick of being away from home. And it seemed we were always
    > away from home! I took dance and swim lessons. I played the violin and
    > was in honor orchestra. I was in scouts and choir at school. When I was
    > older I did some sports, was in pep club and drama. Also Junior
    > Achievement and I began working when I was 12.
    >
    > Saturday days were when my mom and I went grocery shopping. This involved
    > going to at least two stores and there was lunch at the Safeway food
    > counter. I believe they served lunch and dinner. If you wanted steak,
    > you picked your own from the meat dept. and they cooked it for you.
    >
    > Sundays we went to church and then afterwards was either some sort of
    > shopping extravaganza or we took a day trip. Sometimes we did day trips
    > on Saturday. We also did things at the church on Wednesdays.
    >
    > Sometimes we took weekend trips and we were frequently pulled out of
    > school for various vacations. We never flew anywhere but took car trips
    > and once took a ferry into Canada. I hated those vacations because it
    > meant doing school work in the car or motel.
    >
    > We also did quite a few camping trips either for the weekend or a week at
    > a time. My mom did do some cooking then because there usually weren't
    > restaurants around. Exception being the Boeing camping trips. They had
    > cooks for those. I don't remember having any complaints with the food
    > there.
    >
    > I just really got sick of being on the go all the time! I can remember
    > begging to just stay home. But that rarely seemed to happen.
    >
    > Now one reason I like to dine out is that we can all get what we want to
    > eat. It is very difficult for me to come up with any one meal that we all
    > like. Angela loves chicken and that is pretty much the only meat she
    > likes. I don't like it at all and husband is partial to beef. But he
    > likes things like roast and steak and I can't digest those.
    >
    > Tonight I made Mexican food. Husband and daughter had chicken tacos
    > (crisp shell) with beans, rice and some black olives. I had bean tacos
    > with a very small amount of rice and a ton of extra shredded lettuce.
    > Daughter loved it but I know husband would have preferred shredded beef
    > and something spicier.
    >
    > I just don't like paying restaurant prices. We are pretty much down to
    > going out for Friday dinner. Then lunch and dinner on Sundays because we
    > go with my parents. My mom rarely cooks now and doesn't much like people
    > using her kitchen. Once in a while I just put my foot down and go get
    > prepared food somewhere like herbed chicken breasts and salad, but that
    > winds up costing me more money than if we went out! Daughter doesn't
    > usually like to go out to eat unless maybe she can get a milkshake.
    >




  6. #6
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    > started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    > design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have been
    > given by friends and family. I also learned my strengths and weakness for
    > skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of people... so I
    > am interested to hear more of people's journey to where they are today.
    >
    > Lee
    >


    Pretty much self taught and watching the Frugal Gourmet and Justin Wilson.

    Growing up, we had simple food; roast chicken, roast pork, etc. My
    grandmother made some really great traditional Polish dishes, but we wee too
    young to bother learning from her.

    My wife did most of the cooking when we first married. It was some of her
    family meals, plus some of the normal fare. It was not until we were in our
    30's that we really started to appreciate some of the better foods, better
    ingredients, more complex preparations, and so forth. We would try new
    techniques, different ingredients from the international section of the
    store, cheeses we never heard of etc. It was fun to experiment. Fun to try
    new recipes on friends.


  7. #7
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    the fact that the two of you worked/played together is very cool, one of the
    things that drew me to my dh was his cooking skills... i am great at
    designing dishes, and i make several things in the excellent catagory, but i
    do not have the "sit/stand still" factor that allows for much close
    attention cooking, which he is excellent at, most of what i cook are
    simmering sorts o things... man i LOVE Justin wilson. Lee

    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    >> started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    >> design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have
    >> been given by friends and family. I also learned my strengths and
    >> weakness for skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of
    >> people... so I am interested to hear more of people's journey to where
    >> they are today.
    >>
    >> Lee
    >>

    >
    > Pretty much self taught and watching the Frugal Gourmet and Justin Wilson.
    >
    > Growing up, we had simple food; roast chicken, roast pork, etc. My
    > grandmother made some really great traditional Polish dishes, but we wee
    > too young to bother learning from her.
    >
    > My wife did most of the cooking when we first married. It was some of her
    > family meals, plus some of the normal fare. It was not until we were in
    > our 30's that we really started to appreciate some of the better foods,
    > better ingredients, more complex preparations, and so forth. We would try
    > new techniques, different ingredients from the international section of
    > the store, cheeses we never heard of etc. It was fun to experiment. Fun
    > to try new recipes on friends.




  8. #8
    sf Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    On Wed, 1 Jun 2011 07:52:48 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > man i LOVE Justin wilson.


    I do too... we should do a Justin Wilson cook along someday! Those
    who are chat shy won't go into the chat room, just check in here and
    post their final results... hopefully with a tinypic.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    Re: [email protected]
    Ed Pawlowski <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pretty much self taught and watching the Frugal Gourmet and Justin
    > Wilson.


    I miss Justin Wilson, I ga-ron-tee.



  10. #10
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    > started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    > design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have been
    > given by friends and family. I also learned my strengths and weakness for
    > skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of people... so I
    > am interested to hear more of people's journey to where they are today.
    >
    > Lee
    >

    My mother didn't like cooking. She did the very basics just because it's
    what a 1950's housewife was expected to do. My father taught her how to
    make basic red (tomato) sauce. And she learned a few things from her
    mother. But by all accounts my grandmother didn't want children underfoot
    when she was in the kitchen. By the time my mother got married in 1951 she
    was basically given a Betty Crocker cookbook and told to figure it out. LOL

    I was a little more curious. In my early 20's I watched The Frugal Gourmet
    (Jeff Smith) and The Galloping Gourmet (Graham Kerr - I believe he may have
    still been drinking then). Not so much Julia Child but I did catch a few of
    her later shows. I bought cookbooks and read them. I tried new things.
    There's no one real influence or particular taste or style.

    I still prefer to keep things simple. Give me a recipe with 20 ingredients
    and 10 steps and I'm likely to skip it no matter how good it may be.

    Jill


  11. #11
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    On 01/06/2011 4:29 PM, jmcquown wrote:

    > My mother didn't like cooking. She did the very basics just because it's
    > what a 1950's housewife was expected to do. My father taught her how to
    > make basic red (tomato) sauce. And she learned a few things from her
    > mother. But by all accounts my grandmother didn't want children
    > underfoot when she was in the kitchen. By the time my mother got married
    > in 1951 she was basically given a Betty Crocker cookbook and told to
    > figure it out. LOL


    My mother was quite competent in the kitchen and was able to crank out
    seriously good food to feed a crowd without any fuss. She had a knack
    for baking, which she probabaly got from her father. My grandfather was
    the one who did the Christmas baking and prepared the big roast dinners.


    > I was a little more curious. In my early 20's I watched The Frugal
    > Gourmet (Jeff Smith) and The Galloping Gourmet (Graham Kerr - I believe
    > he may have still been drinking then).


    If Kerr was interesting and entertaining it was probably still in his
    drinking days. I enjoyed his show and one of the most important things
    I learned about cooking was that there are styles of cooking and that
    the technique is as important as the ingredients.


    > Not so much Julia Child but I did


    I usually saw Julia only as guests on other shows.


    > catch a few of her later shows. I bought cookbooks and read them. I
    > tried new things. There's no one real influence or particular taste or
    > style.
    >
    > I still prefer to keep things simple. Give me a recipe with 20
    > ingredients and 10 steps and I'm likely to skip it no matter how good it
    > may be.



    Back to my comment about Kerr and styles of cooking, a lot of times
    recipes are much more involved than they need to be because the list all
    ingredients and every step and things could be much simpler if the
    recipe simply told you to use some basic procedure... for instance.... .
    a lot of recipes require some sort of thickener. A newbie would need to
    be told to melt some butter in a pot, add an equal amount of flour and
    to stir around for a minute or two. An experience cook would make some
    roux.

    If the recipe needed Bechemel sauce it would list the ingredients and
    steps to make the above roux and add milk, stirring constantly. Having
    learned to cook y style, I would just make a white sauce using a roux.

    Souffles can be very intimidating to people but I have had very good
    results faking souffles by using a roux to make a white sauce, adding
    something to flavour it and adding beaten egg yolks, whipping egg whites
    and folding them in.



  12. #12
    Libby Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    On Jun 1, 4:29*pm, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "Storrmmee" <rgr...@consolidated.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..> after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    > > started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    > > design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have been
    > > given by friends and family. *I also learned my strengths and weakness for
    > > skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of people... so I
    > > am interested to hear more of people's journey to where they are today.

    >
    > > Lee

    >
    > My mother didn't like cooking. *She did the very basics just because it's
    > what a 1950's housewife was expected to do. *My father taught her how to
    > make basic red (tomato) sauce. *And she learned a few things from her
    > mother. *But by all accounts my grandmother didn't want children underfoot
    > when she was in the kitchen. *By the time my mother got married in 1951she
    > was basically given a Betty Crocker cookbook and told to figure it out. LOL
    >
    > I was a little more curious. *In my early 20's I watched The Frugal Gourmet
    > (Jeff Smith) and The Galloping Gourmet (Graham Kerr - I believe he may have
    > still been drinking then). *Not so much Julia Child but I did catch a few of
    > her later shows. *I bought cookbooks and read them. *I tried new things.
    > There's no one real influence or particular taste or style.
    >
    > I still prefer to keep things simple. *Give me a recipe with 20 ingredients
    > and 10 steps and I'm likely to skip it no matter how good it may be.
    >
    > Jill


    I'm like your mother Jill; in that when I married in '58, I too was
    given the Betty Crocker cookbook that was my mother-in-law's copy.
    She didn't need it, but I sure did! The only thing I could cook was
    mashed potatoes and hamburgers. I am like you though in that I got
    interested in the 70's and watched the same shows. The first caesar
    salad I made from a newspaper recipe called for a clove of garlic, and
    I put in the whole head! I'd never seen garlic before I loved Jeff
    Smith in the 80's and still use his 1st two books for some things.

  13. #13
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    Storrmmee wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > after reading about different people post about their mother's
    > cooking I started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced
    > my recipe design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging
    > pallet i have been given by friends and family. I also learned my
    > strengths and weakness for skills and what my inate talents are from
    > the same group of people... so I am interested to hear more of
    > people's journey to where they are today.


    Lee, Mom is a lovely woman, but she's not a 'cook' of the sort any here
    would recognize. It's not totally a joke that us kids prayed for TV
    dinners of the 70's and school lunches.

    I set out once I moved from home to experiment with at least 1 new food
    each trip to the grocery store. It was very easy as my experience was
    low. Mom's spice cabinet contained salt, rarely used black pepper, and
    cinnimon.

    I learned on my own by trying things. I am as unpicky as gou can find
    since my list of 'don't like' is: eyeballs, brains, liver (all of these
    have exceptions), american strong versions of collard, mustard greens
    (like thw asian milder ones well).

    Thats about it. Anything else in the veggie or animal kingdon is fair
    game.

    Oh, I don't get to eat much pork blood but that's because the pets
    start positively *howling* for their share and I always give in. It's
    just too fun to see them go eyeball deep and have to clean them up (my
    14 year old 'puppy' is white on the face and loves to drip on the rug!).

    In the end? I hate almost all liver and I do not care to hear 'oh, you
    just havent had it made my way' and I dislike the idea of an eyeball
    looking back at me as an edible.

  14. #14
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    On 6/1/2011 1:41 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    > I miss Justin Wilson, I ga-ron-tee.


    He was definitely a hoot and fun to watch!

    Sky

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  15. #15
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    good idea, maybe we can do that this winter when we get back in the
    house,... as long as nobody makes that potatoe salad he made with french
    fries... i could have done without seeing that... i could see pretty good,
    was making lunch, he made some sausage dish which sounded great, then he
    says potatoe salad, mixes everyhing in using fries for the potatoes, i
    couldn't beleive it so went in and got close enough to see what he was
    mixing... eeeiwy, looked horrible so i never even attempted that.

    Lee
    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:0hpcu69iat079l8f87[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 1 Jun 2011 07:52:48 -0500, "Storrmmee"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> man i LOVE Justin wilson.

    >
    > I do too... we should do a Justin Wilson cook along someday! Those
    > who are chat shy won't go into the chat room, just check in here and
    > post their final results... hopefully with a tinypic.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.




  16. #16
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    i don't mind lots of steps or ing. but i can't stand there and "stir
    constantly" i can't stand still that long, lol,...

    Lee
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> after reading about different people post about their mother's cooking I
    >> started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced my recipe
    >> design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging pallet i have
    >> been given by friends and family. I also learned my strengths and
    >> weakness for skills and what my inate talents are from the same group of
    >> people... so I am interested to hear more of people's journey to where
    >> they are today.
    >>
    >> Lee
    >>

    > My mother didn't like cooking. She did the very basics just because it's
    > what a 1950's housewife was expected to do. My father taught her how to
    > make basic red (tomato) sauce. And she learned a few things from her
    > mother. But by all accounts my grandmother didn't want children underfoot
    > when she was in the kitchen. By the time my mother got married in 1951
    > she was basically given a Betty Crocker cookbook and told to figure it
    > out. LOL
    >
    > I was a little more curious. In my early 20's I watched The Frugal
    > Gourmet (Jeff Smith) and The Galloping Gourmet (Graham Kerr - I believe he
    > may have still been drinking then). Not so much Julia Child but I did
    > catch a few of her later shows. I bought cookbooks and read them. I
    > tried new things. There's no one real influence or particular taste or
    > style.
    >
    > I still prefer to keep things simple. Give me a recipe with 20
    > ingredients and 10 steps and I'm likely to skip it no matter how good it
    > may be.
    >
    > Jill




  17. #17
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    i love the smell of liver, and the few bites i have managed to chew taste
    pretty good, but my sistem rejects with extreme force, rather like a cat
    projjectile vomiting bird feathers so i can't eat it, its the iron as a
    vitamin with it does me the same way, i don't eat blood of an kind, Lee
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > Storrmmee wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> after reading about different people post about their mother's
    >> cooking I started thinking about my roots of cooking, who influenced
    >> my recipe design and my tastes in food, it is a very wide ranging
    >> pallet i have been given by friends and family. I also learned my
    >> strengths and weakness for skills and what my inate talents are from
    >> the same group of people... so I am interested to hear more of
    >> people's journey to where they are today.

    >
    > Lee, Mom is a lovely woman, but she's not a 'cook' of the sort any here
    > would recognize. It's not totally a joke that us kids prayed for TV
    > dinners of the 70's and school lunches.
    >
    > I set out once I moved from home to experiment with at least 1 new food
    > each trip to the grocery store. It was very easy as my experience was
    > low. Mom's spice cabinet contained salt, rarely used black pepper, and
    > cinnimon.
    >
    > I learned on my own by trying things. I am as unpicky as gou can find
    > since my list of 'don't like' is: eyeballs, brains, liver (all of these
    > have exceptions), american strong versions of collard, mustard greens
    > (like thw asian milder ones well).
    >
    > Thats about it. Anything else in the veggie or animal kingdon is fair
    > game.
    >
    > Oh, I don't get to eat much pork blood but that's because the pets
    > start positively *howling* for their share and I always give in. It's
    > just too fun to see them go eyeball deep and have to clean them up (my
    > 14 year old 'puppy' is white on the face and loves to drip on the rug!).
    >
    > In the end? I hate almost all liver and I do not care to hear 'oh, you
    > just havent had it made my way' and I dislike the idea of an eyeball
    > looking back at me as an edible.




  18. #18
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?


    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    >i don't mind lots of steps or ing. but i can't stand there and "stir
    >constantly" i can't stand still that long, lol,...


    No risotto for you!



  19. #19
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?

    my single attempt...could have probably been grounds for spousal abuse,...
    fortunately he is the forgiving sort, Lee


    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    >>i don't mind lots of steps or ing. but i can't stand there and "stir
    >>constantly" i can't stand still that long, lol,...

    >
    > No risotto for you!
    >
    >




  20. #20
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: roots of cooking?


    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:RAxFp.300688$[email protected] .com...
    > On 01/06/2011 4:29 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> My mother didn't like cooking. She did the very basics just because it's
    >> what a 1950's housewife was expected to do. My father taught her how to
    >> make basic red (tomato) sauce. And she learned a few things from her
    >> mother. But by all accounts my grandmother didn't want children
    >> underfoot when she was in the kitchen. By the time my mother got married
    >> in 1951 she was basically given a Betty Crocker cookbook and told to
    >> figure it out. LOL

    >
    > My mother was quite competent in the kitchen and was able to crank out
    > seriously good food to feed a crowd without any fuss. She had a knack for
    > baking, which she probabaly got from her father. My grandfather was the
    > one who did the Christmas baking and prepared the big roast dinners.
    >

    Good for you! My mother hated cooking. She often asked where I got my
    "cooking gene". LOL She got quite a few recipes from magazines and
    newspaper articles.

    >> catch a few of her later shows. I bought cookbooks and read them. I
    >> tried new things. There's no one real influence or particular taste or
    >> style.
    >>
    >> I still prefer to keep things simple. Give me a recipe with 20
    >> ingredients and 10 steps and I'm likely to skip it no matter how good it
    >> may be.

    >
    > Back to my comment about Kerr and styles of cooking, a lot of times
    > recipes are much more involved than they need to be because the list all
    > ingredients and every step and things could be much simpler if the recipe
    > simply told you to use some basic procedure... for instance.... .
    > a lot of recipes require some sort of thickener. A newbie would need to be
    > told to melt some butter in a pot, add an equal amount of flour and to
    > stir around for a minute or two. An experience cook would make some roux.
    >
    > If the recipe needed Bechemel sauce it would list the ingredients and
    > steps to make the above roux and add milk, stirring constantly. Having
    > learned to cook style, I would just make a white sauce using a roux.
    >

    But see, butter, flour, salt & pepper is a roux. You cook it longer to make
    brown or dark roux for gumbo. Add milk and voila! white sauce IS bechamel.
    Some cookbooks make it sound so complicated.

    I do enjoy reading cookbooks

    Jill


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