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Thread: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

  1. #1
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    A local fish company has been consistently offering "Bodega Bay Red Snapper"
    at reasonable prices. Since true red snapper doesn't live within 2000 miles
    of Bodega Bay, I surmise that they're talking about one of the myriad
    rockfish which are marketed under the name "Pacific Red Snapper."

    At any rate, rockfish are described in www.alaskanfeast.com/prod02.htm as
    "delicate and flaky" with a "mild, sweet taste."

    If I do get around to buying it, what would be some good ways to prepare it?
    My first thought is to cook it in parchment and serve it with the
    verjus-saffron-vanilla beurre blanc I tried recently with scallops. That was
    AMAZING, but I am not crazy about returning to that flavor combination so
    soon -- I want something different.

    Whatever I do, I don't want to overwhelm the flavor of the fish. I think
    that that provision rules out most fish stews and robust tomato sauces.
    Broiling or grilling the fish might toughen the outside, and I'm leaning
    away from those methods because of it. I'm thinking DELICATE, and I'm a bit
    outside my normal cooking zone for that reason.

    Any ideas?

    Bob


  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 03:05:31 -0700, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > A local fish company has been consistently offering "Bodega Bay Red Snapper"
    > at reasonable prices. Since true red snapper doesn't live within 2000 miles
    > of Bodega Bay, I surmise that they're talking about one of the myriad
    > rockfish which are marketed under the name "Pacific Red Snapper."
    >
    > At any rate, rockfish are described in www.alaskanfeast.com/prod02.htm as
    > "delicate and flaky" with a "mild, sweet taste."
    >
    > If I do get around to buying it, what would be some good ways to prepare it?


    We would catch it in SF bay off of Treasure Island. Lots of it,
    20-30 fish at a time. There's a ton of it right around the Bay
    Bridge when in season (or at least there used to be).

    We mostly deep-fried it for fish and chips. It wasn't that
    "delicate" IMO. It was a pretty sturdy fish that held up well to
    all sorts of cooking.

    -sw

  3. #3
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    > Whatever I do, I don't want to overwhelm the flavor of the fish. I
    > think that that provision rules out most fish stews and robust
    > tomato
    > sauces. Broiling or grilling the fish might toughen the outside, and
    > I'm leaning away from those methods because of it. I'm thinking
    > DELICATE, and I'm a bit outside my normal cooking zone for that
    > reason.
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > Bob


    A popular fish here on the Chesapeake Bay is known locally as
    "rockfish" when, in fact, it's striped bass. One good way of
    preparing it is stuffed with crabmeat and baked - if that whets your
    tastebuds, I can post the recipe.

    Dora


  4. #4
    aem Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    On Aug 17, 3:05*am, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > A local fish company has been consistently offering "Bodega Bay Red Snapper"
    > at reasonable prices. Since true red snapper doesn't live within 2000 miles
    > of Bodega Bay, I surmise that they're talking about one of the myriad
    > rockfish which are marketed under the name "Pacific Red Snapper."
    >
    > At any rate, rockfish are described inwww.alaskanfeast.com/prod02.htmas
    > "delicate and flaky" with a "mild, sweet taste."
    >
    > If I do get around to buying it, what would be some good ways to prepare it?
    > My first thought is to cook it in parchment and serve it with the
    > verjus-saffron-vanilla beurre blanc I tried recently with scallops. That was
    > AMAZING, but I am not crazy about returning to that flavor combination so
    > soon -- I want something different.
    >
    > Whatever I do, I don't want to overwhelm the flavor of the fish. I think
    > that that provision rules out most fish stews and robust tomato sauces.
    > Broiling or grilling the fish might toughen the outside, and I'm leaning
    > away from those methods because of it. I'm thinking DELICATE, and I'm a bit
    > outside my normal cooking zone for that reason.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >

    Huachinango a la veracruzana, aka huachinango veracruzano. Although
    the sauce is plenty flavorful it doesn't overwhelm the fish. I've
    made it with a variety of the fish they sell as snapper and it works.
    Here is a link to one of the many recipes out there. It's as good as
    any for a place to start, although the cooking time is a little long
    unless it's a good-sized fish. -aem
    http://www.mexonline.com/culture/mxrec4.htm

  5. #5
    Don Martinich Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    In article <00423847$0$28431$[email protected]>,
    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > A local fish company has been consistently offering "Bodega Bay Red Snapper"
    > at reasonable prices. Since true red snapper doesn't live within 2000 miles
    > of Bodega Bay, I surmise that they're talking about one of the myriad
    > rockfish which are marketed under the name "Pacific Red Snapper."
    >
    > At any rate, rockfish are described in www.alaskanfeast.com/prod02.htm as
    > "delicate and flaky" with a "mild, sweet taste."
    >
    > If I do get around to buying it, what would be some good ways to prepare it?
    > My first thought is to cook it in parchment and serve it with the
    > verjus-saffron-vanilla beurre blanc I tried recently with scallops. That was
    > AMAZING, but I am not crazy about returning to that flavor combination so
    > soon -- I want something different.
    >
    > Whatever I do, I don't want to overwhelm the flavor of the fish. I think
    > that that provision rules out most fish stews and robust tomato sauces.
    > Broiling or grilling the fish might toughen the outside, and I'm leaning
    > away from those methods because of it. I'm thinking DELICATE, and I'm a bit
    > outside my normal cooking zone for that reason.
    >
    > Any ideas?
    >
    > Bob


    Pacific Snapper (Sebastodes sp.) will hold up to broiling over charcoal.
    Particularly if you cook it whole- they are not too large to do that.
    Coat it with garlic infused olive oil before broiling and then serve
    with parsley and lemons. It's also good when baked a la Florentine.
    http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/rec...la-Florentine1
    15301.shtml

    D.M.

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    aem wrote:

    > Huachinango a la veracruzana, aka huachinango veracruzano. Although the
    > sauce is plenty flavorful it doesn't overwhelm the fish. I've made it
    > with a variety of the fish they sell as snapper and it works.


    Really? Maybe I'll give it a try, then.


    > Here is a link to one of the many recipes out there. It's as good as any
    > for a place to start, although the cooking time is a little long unless
    > it's a good-sized fish. -aem
    > http://www.mexonline.com/culture/mxrec4.htm


    I'm not entirely sure I can get a whole fish. If I can, that recipe looks
    like a very good one. With fillets, the skin is not there to protect the
    flesh, so I'd be afraid of its drying out or toughening. I'll have to see
    what the market offers; the fishmonger will be at the farmers' market I'm
    attending later today.

    In _Feast of Sunlight_, Norman Van Aken has a rather-fascinating recipe for
    braised snapper in Chardonnay with a chiffonade of lettuces; that ought to
    be a gentle-enough way of cooking fillets. Van Aken specializes in using
    ingredients from in and around Florida, including "true" red snapper, so I'd
    expect that recipe to be especially good. In _New World Kitchen_, he gives a
    recipe for fish in foil with sweet onions, tomatoes, and mojo verde, noting
    that the recipe works well with snapper and dolphin. Then in _New World
    Cuisine_, he gives an intriguing recipe for buttered snapper baked in a
    banana leaf with a "steam" of clams, boniato, bonnets [Scotch bonnet
    chiles], saffron and garlic. If I could get boniatos, this would be my
    "must-cook" recipe, but I've been searching fruitlessly for them in
    California for the last nine years.

    I'm also considering a recipe for spiced fish with a passion-fruit beurre
    blanc; the recipe is in _Terrific Pacific_.

    Decisions, decisions...

    Bob




  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Don wrote:

    > Pacific Snapper (Sebastodes sp.) will hold up to broiling over charcoal.
    > Particularly if you cook it whole- they are not too large to do that.
    > Coat it with garlic infused olive oil before broiling and then serve
    > with parsley and lemons. It's also good when baked a la Florentine.
    > http://www.cdkitchen.com/recipes/rec...la-Florentine1
    > 15301.shtml


    I'll have to see if I can get a whole one! Thanks.

    Bob




  8. #8
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Dora wrote:

    > A popular fish here on the Chesapeake Bay is known locally as "rockfish"
    > when, in fact, it's striped bass. One good way of preparing it is stuffed
    > with crabmeat and baked - if that whets your tastebuds, I can post the
    > recipe.


    I ran into that nomenclature when I was looking for recipes for "Pacific Red
    Snapper." As far as I can tell, striped bass has very different cooking
    attributes from what I'm calling rockfish. It *should* be good stuffed with
    crabmeat and baked, but only if I can find a whole fish, which I'm not
    entirely certain will be the case. I'll find out in about six hours.

    Bob




  9. #9
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    On Mon, 17 Aug 2009 06:02:34 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:

    > We would catch it in SF bay off of Treasure Island. Lots of it,
    > 20-30 fish at a time. There's a ton of it right around the Bay
    > Bridge when in season (or at least there used to be).
    >
    > We mostly deep-fried it for fish and chips. It wasn't that
    > "delicate" IMO. It was a pretty sturdy fish that held up well to
    > all sorts of cooking.


    I forgot to mention: It's more commonly known as Rock Cod in the
    fishing and culinary circles around SF bay.

    -sw

  10. #10
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Dora wrote:
    >
    >> A popular fish here on the Chesapeake Bay is known locally as
    >> "rockfish" when, in fact, it's striped bass. One good way of
    >> preparing it is stuffed with crabmeat and baked - if that whets
    >> your
    >> tastebuds, I can post the recipe.

    >
    > I ran into that nomenclature when I was looking for recipes for
    > "Pacific Red Snapper." As far as I can tell, striped bass has very
    > different cooking attributes from what I'm calling rockfish. It
    > *should* be good stuffed with crabmeat and baked, but only if I can
    > find a whole fish, which I'm not entirely certain will be the case.
    > I'll find out in about six hours.
    > Bob


    Actually, it's often prepared using fillets - essentially sandwiching
    the crabmeat.


  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    On Tue, 18 Aug 2009 10:22:10 -0400, "Dora" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Actually, it's often prepared using fillets - essentially sandwiching
    >the crabmeat.


    I used to buy fish prepared that way. It's very good.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  12. #12
    Curt Nelson Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:00423847$0$28431$[email protected]..
    >A local fish company has been consistently offering "Bodega Bay Red
    >Snapper"
    > at reasonable prices. Since true red snapper doesn't live within 2000
    > miles
    > of Bodega Bay, I surmise that they're talking about one of the myriad
    > rockfish which are marketed under the name "Pacific Red Snapper."
    >
    > At any rate, rockfish are described in www.alaskanfeast.com/prod02.htm as
    > "delicate and flaky" with a "mild, sweet taste."
    >
    > If I do get around to buying it, what would be some good ways to prepare
    > it?
    > My first thought is to cook it in parchment and serve it with the
    > verjus-saffron-vanilla beurre blanc I tried recently with scallops. That
    > was AMAZING, but I am not crazy about returning to that flavor combination
    > so soon -- I want something different.
    >
    > Whatever I do, I don't want to overwhelm the flavor of the fish. I think
    > that that provision rules out most fish stews and robust tomato sauces.
    > Broiling or grilling the fish might toughen the outside, and I'm leaning
    > away from those methods because of it. I'm thinking DELICATE, and I'm a
    > bit
    > outside my normal cooking zone for that reason.
    >
    > Any ideas?



    Some species of Rockfish have been severely overfished. You may want to
    check the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program to get a better idea
    about what you're eating.

    Here's a link to Rockfish:
    http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/c...et.aspx?gid=16

    Hasta,
    Curt Nelson



  13. #13
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Curt wrote:

    > Some species of Rockfish have been severely overfished. You may want to
    > check the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program to get a better
    > idea about what you're eating.
    >
    > Here's a link to Rockfish:
    > http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/c...et.aspx?gid=16


    The rockfish from Bodega Bay would be caught by hook and line, and are
    listed as a "good alternative" to trawled rockfish.

    I generally do refer to the Monterey Bay Aquarium guides before buying
    seafood with which I am unfamiliar.

    Bob




  14. #14
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    > Curt wrote:
    >
    >> Some species of Rockfish have been severely overfished. You may
    >> want
    >> to check the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program to get a
    >> better idea about what you're eating.
    >>
    >> Here's a link to Rockfish:
    >> http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/c...et.aspx?gid=16

    >
    > The rockfish from Bodega Bay would be caught by hook and line, and
    > are
    > listed as a "good alternative" to trawled rockfish.
    >
    > I generally do refer to the Monterey Bay Aquarium guides before
    > buying
    > seafood with which I am unfamiliar.
    >
    > Bob


    Interestingly, the Chesapeake Bay "rockfish" (striped bass) became so
    overfished that the State declared a moratorium, which lasted for
    three years. The fish rebounded and the catch is now carefully
    controlled. I wish they'd do the same with the crabs. That annual
    catch is a ghost of its former self.


  15. #15
    Curt Nelson Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:002b1b92$0$1940$[email protected]..
    > Curt wrote:
    >
    >> Some species of Rockfish have been severely overfished. You may want to
    >> check the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program to get a better
    >> idea about what you're eating.
    >>
    >> Here's a link to Rockfish:
    >> http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/c...et.aspx?gid=16

    >
    > The rockfish from Bodega Bay would be caught by hook and line, and are
    > listed as a "good alternative" to trawled rockfish.
    >
    > I generally do refer to the Monterey Bay Aquarium guides before buying
    > seafood with which I am unfamiliar.



    Excellent. Thank you for your polite and thoughtful response, which is not
    always easy to come by on the Internet...

    :-)

    Enjoy!

    Hasta,
    Curt Nelson



  16. #16
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"


    "Curt Nelson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:h6it7o$qi$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    > news:002b1b92$0$1940$[email protected]..
    >> Curt wrote:
    >>
    >>> Some species of Rockfish have been severely overfished. You may want to
    >>> check the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program to get a better
    >>> idea about what you're eating.
    >>>
    >>> Here's a link to Rockfish:
    >>> http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/c...et.aspx?gid=16

    >>
    >> The rockfish from Bodega Bay would be caught by hook and line, and are
    >> listed as a "good alternative" to trawled rockfish.
    >>
    >> I generally do refer to the Monterey Bay Aquarium guides before buying
    >> seafood with which I am unfamiliar.

    >
    >
    > Excellent. Thank you for your polite and thoughtful response, which is not
    > always easy to come by on the Internet...
    >


    Particularly from Twatwiliger, as you have undoubtedly already seen.



  17. #17
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Rockfish, a.k.a. "Pacific Red Snapper"

    Curt wrote:

    > Excellent. Thank you for your polite and thoughtful response, which is not
    > always easy to come by on the Internet...


    You're entirely welcome!

    I think it depends on exactly who you are and how your post is worded. Some
    people rarely get flamed because their love of food and their knowledge of
    cooking are so overwhelming that it's a bit intimidating. Nobody here would
    DARE challenge Barb Schaller when it comes to canning or preserving; it
    would be like trying to level Mount Chimborazo with a toothpick! Christine
    is such a sweetheart and has such an encyclopedic knowledge of the Western
    Mediterranean cuisine, nobody attacks her either. Koko's love of food shines
    through in her photography, and everybody benefits from seeing the works she
    produces. Kathleen and Pennyaline are such awesome wordsmiths that they
    almost qualify as aikido masters, having the ability to render an opponent
    helpless with little to no wasted effort on their part.

    Some posters, most notably Sheldon and cyber****, have only very limited
    knowledge about cooking, yet feel compelled to participate here. Since they
    have next to no cooking knowledge to impart, their participation consists of
    fantasy-laden personal attacks. Other posters, like sf, Bobo, and Jill, like
    to spend their time writing posts which disapprove of the foods other people
    eat. Orlando seems to view himself (if you'll excuse the expression) as the
    champion of the poor, so any thread which hints at prosperity will draw him
    into it as helplessly as a moth approaches a flame. Andy obviously suffers
    from something which causes wild mood swings; as to whether substance abuse
    is involved, speculation is pointless.

    If you killfile those posters in the last paragraph, and you don't get
    dragged into the cross-posted crap with the UK group or the fast-food group,
    you'll almost always see a polite and thoughtful response. Whether you find
    that response USEFUL is a bit iffy; some posters (like Greg and blake) like
    to deflect the cooking discussions into topics they find more interesting.

    Of course, you've been here long enough to know all that already. You also
    probably know that of the people I recommended killfiling, cyber**** is the
    only one whom *I* have killfiled. So I'm guilty of "Do as I say, not as I
    do," but it's because I don't want to limit my reading only to the polite
    and thoughtful posts here. :-)

    Bob


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