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Thread: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

  1. #1
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    "MtnTraveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BR3qm.79573$[email protected] ...
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating corn
    > in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >
    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our chicken
    > dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top grill
    > (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't have
    > access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire, turning
    > often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn. (I confess to burning my
    > portion as I really like more black than brown!) Then we take a stick of
    > sweet butter and rub it over the ears, add a bit of salt, and smile. I
    > much prefer it prepared this way, rather than boiling it.
    >
    > Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling sweet corn
    > seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a favorite street
    > food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold still in the husk, well cooked,
    > (boiled) but usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite sweet, and
    > eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some counties corn is
    > dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never tried that.
    >
    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?
    >
    >

    We routinely salt and butter the corn, wrap it in foil, and put it on the
    grill at medium heat, turning about once a minute. Generally we do this with
    the grill lid down. I don't know how it would work inside.

    Ed








  2. #2
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Thu, 10 Sep 2009 03:17:19 -0700, Theron wrote:

    > We routinely salt and butter the corn, wrap it in foil, and put it on the
    > grill at medium heat, turning about once a minute. Generally we do this with
    > the grill lid down. I don't know how it would work inside.


    You have one of those magic corn turners that can turn the corn
    every minute with the lid down?

    I've been looking for one of those. Where did you buy it?

    -sw

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    Sqwertz wrote:

    >> We routinely salt and butter the corn, wrap it in foil, and put it on the
    >> grill at medium heat, turning about once a minute. Generally we do this
    >> with the grill lid down. I don't know how it would work inside.

    >
    > You have one of those magic corn turners that can turn the corn
    > every minute with the lid down?
    >
    > I've been looking for one of those. Where did you buy it?


    It wouldn't have to be magic. I'd think one of those roller-type hot dog
    grills would work okay. So would a rotisserie. Or you could have the corn on
    long flat skewers which stuck out so far that you could turn them while the
    lid was 99% closed.

    Bob


  4. #4
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    "MtnTraveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BR3qm.79573$[email protected] ...
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating corn
    > in different countries, preparing it in different ways.

    snip
    >
    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    We steam it for about 5 minutes and eat it without any toppings as they
    interfere with the taste of the sweet corn.
    Janet



  5. #5
    pamjd Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Sep 10, 7:11´┐Żam, "Janet Bostwick" <nos...@nospam.net> wrote:
    > "MtnTraveler" <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:BR3qm.79573$[email protected] ...> As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating corn
    > > in different countries, preparing it in different ways.

    > snip
    >
    > > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    >
    > We steam it for about 5 minutes and eat it without any toppings as they
    > interfere with the taste of the sweet corn.
    > Janet


    A friend of mine peels back the husk, takes out the silk, brushes on
    mayo, rolls in grated parm. pull the husk back up to cover the ear and
    roast on the grill for a few min. Her family loves it but I have not
    tried it. I simply like a bit of butter and pepper.

  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    MtnTraveler wrote on Thu, 10 Sep 2009 22:41:08 +0100:

    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with
    > our chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have


    > Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling
    > sweet corn seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a
    > favorite street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia,
    > sold still in the husk, well cooked, (boiled) but usually
    > served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite sweet, and eaten
    > without any added toppings. I know that in some counties corn is
    > dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never tried
    > that.


    For myself or perhaps two people, I find that the microwave does a good
    job at four minutes per normal-sized ear.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  7. #7
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    James wrote to MtnTraveler on Thu, 10 Sep 2009 08:21:38 -0400:

    >> We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along
    >> with our chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove.
    >> We have


    >> Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling
    >> sweet corn seems to be much more common around the world, and
    >> it's a favorite street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold
    >> still in the husk, well cooked, (boiled) but
    >> usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite sweet, and
    >> eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some
    >> counties corn is dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've
    >> never tried that.


    > For myself or perhaps two people, I find that the microwave
    > does a good job at four minutes per normal-sized ear.


    Sorry, adding to my own post. I rinse the cob in all its husks and leave
    them on for nuking. It's certainly a very easy way to prepare things and
    the husks can easily be removed using a dish towel in each hand.



    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Thu 10 Sep 2009 05:11:58a, Janet Bostwick told us...

    >
    > "MtnTraveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:BR3qm.79573$[email protected] ...
    >> As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating
    >> corn in different countries, preparing it in different ways.

    > snip
    >>
    >> Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do
    >> you prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    > We steam it for about 5 minutes and eat it without any toppings as they
    > interfere with the taste of the sweet corn.
    > Janet


    LOL! We eat the corn to get to the butter and salt. :-) Actually,
    neither of us prefer "sweet corn", opting instead for large cob, large
    kernal yellow corn, which some might refer to as field corn. It takes a
    bit more cooking. I have also roasted it on the grill, prepping by pulling
    back the husks, removing the silk, buttering and salting or spicing, then
    tying the husks back tightly and soaking in water before putting on the
    grill for 12-15 minutes, turning occasionally. The husks blacken, the corn
    browns spottily. We don't have an indoor grill.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ************************************************** **********************
    I eat merely to put food out of my mind. N.F. Simpson




  9. #9
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    "MtnTraveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BR3qm.79573$[email protected] ...
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating corn
    > in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >
    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our chicken
    > dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top grill
    > (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't have
    > access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire, turning
    > often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn.


    (snippage)

    I have an electric stove so I wouldn't consider grilling inside I've
    often grilled corn on the cob over lump on my Weber kettle grill, though.
    I'd peel back the husk and strip away the silk, then put the husk back in
    place. Soak the corn in water for several hours (this is to prevent
    burning). Then tuck fresh herbs (basil, thyme, marjoram) along the cob,
    brush it with olive oil and put the husk back in place. Grill over indirect
    heat, turning the corn occasionally. I can't remember how long it took,
    maybe 30 minutes total. You like your's "black"? This method won't do
    that. But it was quite tasty. The herbs imparted a really nice flavour to
    the corn. Unfortunately I can't eat corn anymore. Too bad, because I
    really liked grilled corn on the cob.

    Jill


  10. #10
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    James Silverton wrote:
    > MtnTraveler wrote on Thu, 10 Sep 2009 22:41:08 +0100:
    >
    >> We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with
    >> our chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have

    >
    >> Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling
    >> sweet corn seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a
    >> favorite street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia,
    >> sold still in the husk, well cooked, (boiled) but usually
    >> served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite sweet, and eaten
    >> without any added toppings. I know that in some counties corn is
    >> dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never tried
    >> that.

    >
    > For myself or perhaps two people, I find that the microwave does a good
    > job at four minutes per normal-sized ear.
    >
    >


    We microwave. I use nothing on mine. DH likes a little butter and salt.
    I make a few extra ears. I love cold leftover sweet corn.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  11. #11
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Sep 10, 5:41*pm, MtnTraveler <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote:

    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?


    We cook corn only on the grill (gas or charcoal, whichever is in
    use). We never
    boil, microwave, or use any other technique but this:

    Peel off all but a couple layers of the husk. Pull off the silk that
    sticks out the top.
    Soak in salted water for an hour or two. (I know, the salt makes it
    tough, but I can't
    get the husband to give it up.) Lay it on the grill, turning
    frequently so the husk
    doesn't catch fire. (Spritz with water if it does anyway.)

    Peel and serve with butter and salt.

    Cindy Hamilton

  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    Cindy Hamilton wrote:
    > On Sep 10, 5:41 pm, MtnTraveler <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    >> prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    >
    > We cook corn only on the grill (gas or charcoal, whichever is in
    > use). We never
    > boil, microwave, or use any other technique but this:



    I have not boiled corn since I discovered how good it is when grilled in
    the husk. I grilled some for my brother and his wife on the weekend
    because they had never had it done that way. They were both really
    impressed.


    >
    > Peel off all but a couple layers of the husk. Pull off the silk that
    > sticks out the top.
    > Soak in salted water for an hour or two. (I know, the salt makes it
    > tough, but I can't
    > get the husband to give it up.) Lay it on the grill, turning
    > frequently so the husk
    > doesn't catch fire. (Spritz with water if it does anyway.)
    >
    > Peel and serve with butter and salt.



    that is a lot of extra work. I usually get it fresh enough that it
    doesn't need to be soaked. If unsure, I soak it for a while. Then I
    plonk it right on the grill without doing anything to it, turn it every
    few minutes until it is charred on the outside. Let it cool a little
    before peeling off the husk and silk.




  13. #13
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    "MtnTraveler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:BR3qm.79573$[email protected] ...
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating corn
    > in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >
    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our chicken
    > dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove.


    I don't think that is considered roasting, but if you like it, ....



  14. #14
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    MtnTraveler wrote:
    >
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating
    > corn in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >
    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our
    > chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top
    > grill (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't
    > have access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire,
    > turning often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn. (I confess to
    > burning my portion as I really like more black than brown!) Then we take
    > a stick of sweet butter and rub it over the ears, add a bit of salt, and
    > smile. I much prefer it prepared this way, rather than boiling it.
    >
    > Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling sweet corn
    > seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a favorite
    > street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold still in the husk,
    > well cooked, (boiled) but usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite
    > sweet, and eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some
    > counties corn is dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never
    > tried that.
    >
    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?


    I normally microwave corn on the cob, either fully if I'm not doing
    anything grilled in the meal, or if I'm grilling anyway, I microwave the
    corn part way and then finish on the grill.

  15. #15
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4aa910c9$0$26551$[email protected] ster.com...
    >
    > MtnTraveler wrote:
    >>
    >> As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating
    >> corn in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >>
    >> We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our
    >> chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top
    >> grill (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't
    >> have access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire,
    >> turning often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn. (I confess to
    >> burning my portion as I really like more black than brown!) Then we take
    >> a stick of sweet butter and rub it over the ears, add a bit of salt, and
    >> smile. I much prefer it prepared this way, rather than boiling it.
    >>
    >> Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling sweet corn
    >> seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a favorite
    >> street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold still in the husk,
    >> well cooked, (boiled) but usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite
    >> sweet, and eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some
    >> counties corn is dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never
    >> tried that.
    >>
    >> Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    >> prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    >
    > I normally microwave corn on the cob, either fully if I'm not doing
    > anything grilled in the meal, or if I'm grilling anyway, I microwave the
    > corn part way and then finish on the grill.


    I'll grill corn if I'm going to cook like a half dozen ears or more but for
    just a few I nuke them in their husks. Grilling corn in their husks is not
    roasting anyway, it's steaming same as nuking. To properly roast corn grill
    with the husks removed, I peel the husks back so I have a handle to grab
    with the tongs for turning otherwise the tongs will break the kernals.




  16. #16
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > "Pete C." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:4aa910c9$0$26551$[email protected] ster.com...
    > >
    > > MtnTraveler wrote:
    > >>
    > >> As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating
    > >> corn in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    > >>
    > >> We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our
    > >> chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top
    > >> grill (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't
    > >> have access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire,
    > >> turning often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn. (I confess to
    > >> burning my portion as I really like more black than brown!) Then we take
    > >> a stick of sweet butter and rub it over the ears, add a bit of salt, and
    > >> smile. I much prefer it prepared this way, rather than boiling it.
    > >>
    > >> Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling sweet corn
    > >> seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a favorite
    > >> street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold still in the husk,
    > >> well cooked, (boiled) but usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite
    > >> sweet, and eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some
    > >> counties corn is dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never
    > >> tried that.
    > >>
    > >> Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > >> prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    > >
    > > I normally microwave corn on the cob, either fully if I'm not doing
    > > anything grilled in the meal, or if I'm grilling anyway, I microwave the
    > > corn part way and then finish on the grill.

    >
    > I'll grill corn if I'm going to cook like a half dozen ears or more but for
    > just a few I nuke them in their husks. Grilling corn in their husks is not
    > roasting anyway, it's steaming same as nuking. To properly roast corn grill
    > with the husks removed, I peel the husks back so I have a handle to grab
    > with the tongs for turning otherwise the tongs will break the kernals.


    I leave the husk on when microwaving, and remove it when I toss them on
    the grill.

  17. #17
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Sep 10, 4:41*pm, MtnTraveler <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote:
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating
    > corn *in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >
    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our
    > chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top
    > grill (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't
    > have access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire,
    > turning often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn. (I confess to
    > burning my portion as I really like more black than brown!) Then we take
    > a stick of sweet butter and rub it over the ears, add a bit of salt, and
    > smile. I much prefer it prepared this way, rather than boiling it.
    >
    > Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling sweet corn
    > seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a favorite
    > street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold still in the husk,
    > well cooked, (boiled) but usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite
    > sweet, and eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some
    > counties corn is dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never
    > tried that.
    >
    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?


    I nuke it. I buy no more than three ears at a time (live alone) Husk
    one ear and strip off the silk. Rinse the ear under running water.
    Roll the ear in a square of wax paper. Twist the ends, Nuke on HIGH
    for 90 seconds (60 sec, for a small ear, 2 min for a large one)
    Slather with REAL butter and a touch of salt - often flavored salt -
    Celery, Lawry's, Lime&Chile McCormick's Smoky Sweet Pepper Blend is
    fabulous!
    Lynn in Fargo
    Waiting for TEETH before all the sweet corn is gone!

  18. #18
    sueb Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Sep 10, 6:51*am, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > Cindy Hamilton wrote:
    > > On Sep 10, 5:41 pm, MtnTraveler <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote:

    >
    > >> Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > >> prepare your corn and with what do you top it?

    >
    > > We cook corn only on the grill (gas or charcoal, whichever is in
    > > use). *We never
    > > boil, microwave, or use any other technique but this:

    >
    > I have not boiled corn since I discovered how good it is when grilled in
    > the husk. *I grilled some for my brother and his wife on the weekend
    > because they had never had it done that way. They were both really
    > impressed.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Peel off all but a couple layers of the husk. *Pull off the silk that
    > > sticks out the top.
    > > Soak in salted water for an hour or two. *(I know, the salt makes it
    > > tough, but I can't
    > > get the husband to give it up.) * Lay it on the grill, turning
    > > frequently so the husk
    > > doesn't catch fire. *(Spritz with water if it does anyway.)

    >
    > > Peel and serve with butter and salt.

    >
    > that is a lot of extra work. I usually get it fresh enough that it
    > doesn't need to be soaked. *If unsure, I soak it for a while. Then I
    > plonk it right on the grill without doing anything to it, turn it every
    > few minutes until *it is charred on the outside. Let it cool a little
    > before peeling off the husk and silk.


    I'm with you. Just take off the silk that sticks out of the husk,
    remove any husk leaves that are loose and dry, and then put the ears
    right on the grill. The hard part is gaging how long to wait before
    peeling it.

    In China I saw street vendors grilling ears on a stick on hibachis.

    Susan B.

  19. #19
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?

    On Sep 10, 5:41*pm, MtnTraveler <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote:
    > As we were making dinner this evening we started to talk about eating
    > corn *in different countries, preparing it in different ways.
    >
    > We decided we wanted roasted corn on the cobb to go along with our
    > chicken dish, and wanted to roast it on the stove. We have a burner-top
    > grill (actually designed for grilling fish) that we use when we don't
    > have access to a BBQ grill or a campfire. Ten minutes over the fire,
    > turning often gives a nice browned sweetness to the corn. (I confess to
    > burning my portion as I really like more black than brown!) Then we take
    > a stick of sweet butter and rub it over the ears, add a bit of salt, and
    > smile. I much prefer it prepared this way, rather than boiling it.
    >
    > Anyone else roast (grill?) their corn in the house? Boiling sweet corn
    > seems to be much more common around the world, and it's a favorite
    > street food all over Indonesia and Malaysia, sold still in the husk,
    > well cooked, (boiled) but usually served cold. Very tiny ears, but quite
    > sweet, and eaten without any added toppings. I know that in some
    > counties corn is dipped in soy sauce as its topping, but I've never
    > tried that.
    >
    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?


    I like to grill it directly on the grate. It seems to take on a
    roasted flavor if on long enough.

    Usually just butter & salt or plain salt. I do a lime-salt butter
    sometimes that's very good too.

    Kris

  20. #20
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Corn on the Cobb?


    "Cindy Hamilton" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Sep 10, 5:41 pm, MtnTraveler <mtntrave...@versign.com> wrote:

    > Do you only eat roasted corn when you have a BBQ or campfire? How do you
    > prepare your corn and with what do you top it?


    We cook corn only on the grill (gas or charcoal, whichever is in
    use). We never
    boil, microwave, or use any other technique but this:

    Peel off all but a couple layers of the husk. Pull off the silk that
    sticks out the top.
    Soak in salted water for an hour or two. (I know, the salt makes it
    tough, but I can't
    get the husband to give it up.) Lay it on the grill, turning
    frequently so the husk
    doesn't catch fire. (Spritz with water if it does anyway.)

    Peel and serve with butter and salt.

    Cindy Hamilton

    I never heard of soaking corn on the cob (with or without salt). What part
    of the country are you in? I grew up in the mid-west and now live in the
    west.
    Janet



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