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Thread: Roasted Cauliflower

  1. #1
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Roasted Cauliflower

    I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and tossed
    it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper and
    roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    steak.

    It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.

    Jon


  2. #2
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected] on Dec Wed 2009 11:41 am

    > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me
    > how good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets
    > and tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and
    > salt and pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I
    > grilled a small flank steak.
    >
    > It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >
    > Jon
    >


    I toss mine in taco seasoning, curry is suppose to be nice too.

    --
    Is that your nose, or are you eatting a banana? -Jimmy Durante



  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 12:41:16 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    >good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and tossed
    >it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper and
    >roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    >steak.
    >
    >It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >

    I've seen roasted broccoli done on Food TV, have you tried that? They
    finish it off with shaved parmesan.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  4. #4
    ostap bender Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Dec 16, 9:41*am, "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote:
    > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    > good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and tossed
    > it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper and
    > roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    > steak.
    >


    My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    pepper.

    >
    > It got soft, turned brown
    >


    Yep.

    >
    > and tasted wonderful.
    >


    Not bad at all.


  5. #5
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    The message
    <[email protected]>
    from ostap bender <[email protected]> contains these words:


    > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > pepper.


    That sounds SO good! Thanks

    Janet

  6. #6
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower



    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 12:41:16 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    >>good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    >>tossed
    >>it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper
    >>and
    >>roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    >>steak.
    >>
    >>It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >>

    > I've seen roasted broccoli done on Food TV, have you tried that? They
    > finish it off with shaved parmesan.
    >
    >

    No I haven't, but it sounds lovely. I have a wedge of aged parmesan in the
    fridge, too.

    Jon


  7. #7
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower



    "ostap bender" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Dec 16, 9:41 am, "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote:
    >> I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    >> good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    >> tossed
    >> it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper
    >> and
    >> roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    >> steak.
    >>

    >
    > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > pepper.
    >
    >>
    >> It got soft, turned brown
    >>

    >
    > Yep.
    >
    >>
    >> and tasted wonderful.
    >>

    >
    > Not bad at all.
    >



    Yum!


  8. #8
    ostap bender Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Dec 17, 4:42*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    wrote:
    > The message
    > <0bde5ce6-fc5f-4247-8253-f7ddcc118...@a39g2000pre.googlegroups.com>
    > from ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> contains these words:
    >
    > > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > > pepper.

    >
    > *That sounds SO good! Thanks
    >


    Any time. Well, roasting would be healthier than frying but I am not
    sure if it would taste as good. Probably would.

    Another similar Russian-Jewish recipe is for eggplant/kabak (large
    zucchini):

    Slice into thin slices about fifth of an inch thick, roll in flour;
    fry while pressing them with a spatula in a way that makes them lose
    some moisture and hard texture; again serve with sour cream, salt and
    pepper (like almost everything else in Russia, Ukraine, Hungary,
    Poland etc :-)). I may mix in some hot chilli sauce like Sempio
    Sriracha; or an alternative may be some curry spices.

    An alternative is that after they are fried, you add eggs to the pan,
    and make an eggplant omelette.

  9. #9
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower



    sf wrote:
    > On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 12:41:16 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    >> good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and tossed
    >> it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper and
    >> roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    >> steak.
    >>
    >> It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >>

    > I've seen roasted broccoli done on Food TV, have you tried that? They
    > finish it off with shaved parmesan.
    >
    >


    Try grilling broccoli. Amazing.

    -Tracy

  10. #10
    Zeppo Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower



    "Tracy" <k[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hgdgp2$8gc$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    > sf wrote:
    >> On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 12:41:16 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    >>> good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    >>> tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and
    >>> pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a
    >>> small flank steak.
    >>>
    >>> It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >>>

    >> I've seen roasted broccoli done on Food TV, have you tried that? They
    >> finish it off with shaved parmesan.
    >>
    >>

    >
    > Try grilling broccoli. Amazing.
    >
    > -Tracy


    I've heard that. My cousin says she grills broccoli and cauliflower. She
    slices the heads in 1/2 slices (as opposed to breaking it up into florets).

    Jon


  11. #11
    ostap bender Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Dec 17, 6:34*am, ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Dec 17, 4:42*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > The message
    > > <0bde5ce6-fc5f-4247-8253-f7ddcc118...@a39g2000pre.googlegroups.com>
    > > from ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> contains these words:

    >
    > > > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > > > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > > > pepper.

    >
    > > *That sounds SO good! Thanks

    >
    > Any time. Well, roasting would be healthier than frying but I am not
    > sure if it would taste as good. Probably would.
    >
    > Another similar Russian-Jewish recipe is for eggplant/kabak (large
    > zucchini):
    >
    > Slice into thin slices about fifth of an inch thick, roll in flour;
    > fry while pressing them with a spatula in a way that makes them lose
    > some moisture and hard texture; again serve with sour cream, salt and
    > pepper (like almost everything else in Russia, Ukraine, Hungary,
    > Poland etc :-)). I may mix in some hot chilli sauce like Sempio
    > Sriracha; or an alternative may be some curry spices.
    >
    > An alternative is that after they are fried, you add eggs to the pan,
    > and make an eggplant omelette.
    >


    Hey, maybe that's why they call it egg-plant? :-)

    BTW, you can use cauliflower in an omelette as well. I imagine it
    would taste harmoniously.

  12. #12
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower



    Zeppo wrote:
    >
    >
    > "Tracy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:hgdgp2$8gc$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>
    >> sf wrote:
    >>> On Wed, 16 Dec 2009 12:41:16 -0500, "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me
    >>>> how good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into
    >>>> florets and tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic,
    >>>> pressed and salt and pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30
    >>>> minutes, while I grilled a small flank steak.
    >>>>
    >>>> It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >>>>
    >>> I've seen roasted broccoli done on Food TV, have you tried that? They
    >>> finish it off with shaved parmesan.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> Try grilling broccoli. Amazing.
    >>
    >> -Tracy

    >
    > I've heard that. My cousin says she grills broccoli and cauliflower. She
    > slices the heads in 1/2 slices (as opposed to breaking it up into florets).
    >
    > Jon


    Yes, slice the broccoli through the root so you have thin, flat
    "trees". Olive oil, salt and pepper. Tastes completely different.

    Tracy

  13. #13
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    > good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    > tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and
    > pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a
    > small flank steak.
    >
    > It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >
    > Jon


    Roasted cauliflower is indeed wonderful stuff! I'm glad you tried it and
    enjoyed it

    Jill


  14. #14
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Dec 17, 5:58*am, ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Dec 16, 9:41*am, "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote:
    >
    > > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    > > good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and tossed
    > > it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepperand
    > > roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    > > steak.

    >
    > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > pepper.
    >
    >
    >
    > > It got soft, turned brown

    >
    > Yep.
    >
    >
    >
    > > and tasted wonderful.

    >
    > Not bad at all.


    Battered & fried cauliflower, broccoli and mushrooms were popular
    restaurant appetizers in the 70s....

    N.

  15. #15
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Dec 17, 8:34*am, ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Dec 17, 4:42*am, Janet Baraclough <janet.and.j...@zetnet.co.uk>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > The message
    > > <0bde5ce6-fc5f-4247-8253-f7ddcc118...@a39g2000pre.googlegroups.com>
    > > from ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> contains these words:

    >
    > > > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > > > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > > > pepper.

    >
    > > *That sounds SO good! Thanks

    >
    > Any time. Well, roasting would be healthier than frying but I am not
    > sure if it would taste as good. Probably would.
    >
    > Another similar Russian-Jewish recipe is for eggplant/kabak (large
    > zucchini):
    >
    > Slice into thin slices about fifth of an inch thick, roll in flour;
    > fry while pressing them with a spatula in a way that makes them lose
    > some moisture and hard texture; again serve with sour cream, salt and
    > pepper (like almost everything else in Russia, Ukraine, Hungary,
    > Poland etc :-)). I may mix in some hot chilli sauce like Sempio
    > Sriracha; or an alternative may be some curry spices.
    >
    > An alternative is that after they are fried, you add eggs to the pan,
    > and make an eggplant omelette.


    Zucchini slices dipped in egg and then fine cracker crumbs and fried -
    very yummy summer-time treat (along with fried green tomatoes).

    N.

  16. #16
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    hahabogus wrote:
    > "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected] on Dec Wed 2009 11:41 am
    >
    >
    >> I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me
    >> how good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets
    >> and tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and
    >> salt and pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I
    >> grilled a small flank steak.
    >>
    >> It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    >>
    >> Jon
    >>
    >>

    >
    > I toss mine in taco seasoning, curry is suppose to be nice too.


    Taco seasoning would be a change, so would curry.


    Jon baked his at 400 degrees for 30 minutes. I just double checked, and
    the recipe I posted here on November 15th calls for a 450 degree oven
    for 20 minutes (break the cauliflower into bite sized pieces, toss in
    olive oil along with chopped garlic, fresh thyme and kosher salt, then
    bake at 450 for 20 minutes).


    If I am cooking something else in the oven at the same time, it is nice
    to know I could lower the temperature to 400 and cook it 10 minutes
    longer. It would depend on what I was cooking. I do like to roast
    chickens at 400.


    Becca

  17. #17
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower


    On 17-Dec-2009, "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Zeppo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    > >
    > > good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    > > tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and
    > > pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a
    > > small flank steak.
    > >
    > > It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.
    > >
    > > Jon

    >
    > Roasted cauliflower is indeed wonderful stuff! I'm glad you tried it and
    > enjoyed it
    >
    > Jill


    I hate caluliflower; however, I saw this thread and though, what the heck,
    I'll try it. Let's face it, most anything can be improved with olive oil
    and garlic 8-)

    I made it for lunch today using half a head of cauliflower. WOW, it doesn't
    taste like cauliflower; all that horrible cauliflower taste is gone and
    replaced with very pleasant flavor. I'll make it again. Oh, BTW I ate half
    of what I made, roughly, a quarter of a head, much of it before plating.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  18. #18
    Cindy Hamilton Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On Dec 17, 5:03*pm, "l, not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote:
    > On 17-Dec-2009, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]..
    > > > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how

    >
    > > > good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    > > > tossed it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and
    > > > pepper and roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a
    > > > small flank steak.

    >
    > > > It got soft, turned brown and tasted wonderful.

    >
    > > > Jon

    >
    > > Roasted cauliflower is indeed wonderful stuff! *I'm glad you tried itand
    > > enjoyed it

    >
    > > Jill

    >
    > I hate caluliflower; however, I saw this thread and though, what the heck,
    > I'll try it. *Let's face it, most anything can be improved with olive oil
    > and garlic 8-)
    >
    > I made it for lunch today using half a head of cauliflower. *WOW, it doesn't
    > taste like cauliflower; all that horrible cauliflower taste is gone and
    > replaced with very pleasant flavor. *I'll make it again. *Oh, BTW I ate half
    > of what I made, roughly, a quarter of a head, much of it before plating.


    We've got a Syrian restaurant here that sometimes takes roasted
    cauliflower
    and dresses it with lemon juice, olive oil, parsley, and onion.
    That's
    good, too, even at room temperature.

    Cindy Hamilton

  19. #19
    frater mus Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    On 12/18/09 14:17, Cindy Hamilton wrote:

    > We've got a Syrian restaurant here that sometimes takes roasted
    > cauliflower
    > and dresses it with lemon juice, olive oil, parsley, and onion.
    > That's
    > good, too, even at room temperature.


    Had it this year for the first time; the cauliflower was on a buffet,
    very brown, and I couldn't recognize it by sight. Or by taste. I think
    this example was deep fried and the flavor was most like roasted brussel
    sprouts. Very rich and tasty.

    --
    brother mouse
    composed offline and synced later.
    http://www.mousetrap.net/mouse/offline.html


  20. #20
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Roasted Cauliflower

    "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Dec 17, 5:58 am, ostap bender <ostap.bender...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Dec 16, 9:41 am, "Zeppo" <ze...@hotmail.org> wrote:
    >
    > > I've been meaning to try this forever as people have been telling me how
    > > good this is. They were right. Broke up a small head into florets and
    > > tossed
    > > it with olive oil, a large clove of garlic, pressed and salt and pepper
    > > and
    > > roasted it a 400 degrees for 30 minutes, while I grilled a small flank
    > > steak.

    >
    > My Jewish grandma just rolled these small "cauliflorets" in flour or
    > in runny egg dough, fried them, and served with sour cream, salt and
    > pepper.
    >
    >
    >
    > > It got soft, turned brown

    >
    > Yep.
    >
    >
    >
    > > and tasted wonderful.

    >
    > Not bad at all.


    Battered & fried cauliflower, broccoli and mushrooms were popular
    restaurant appetizers in the 70s....

    N.


    I remember battered fried mushrooms! They were always too hot (not spicy,
    just very hot right out of the fryer basket). Delicious!

    Jill


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