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Thread: River fish

  1. #1
    James Guest

    Default River fish

    Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?

    In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    really polluted.

  2. #2
    Edwin Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    "James" <j0069bond[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    > In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    > had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    > really polluted.


    I would and do. Our river is fairly clean these days.



  3. #3
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    James wrote:
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    > In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    > had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    > really polluted.


    I don't believe I'd eat fish from the Missouri or Mississippi. Not real
    sure about the Meramec, either. I guess it would depend where along it
    the fish were caught, and if there'd been recent flooding that washed
    all kinds of god knows what into the water.

    I'd have to pass on fish caught from at least one nearby creek. The
    stable hands at the local barn were puking sick after one of their camp
    outs and bonfires, and they swore it was from the fish they caught and
    ate. And it might even have been true. They'd been swimming in that
    creek with their horses and dogs and by the end of the day that water
    was probably more like "mud & mammal tea" But my money was on the
    whiskey and pepsi, with dirty hands running a close second.


  4. #4
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    James wrote:
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    > In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    > had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    > really polluted.


    Not from the Lower Rio Grande! Especially not since all the agri-land
    run off from hurricane Dolly. UGH!

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Bad spelling. Bad punctuation
    Good Friends. Good Life

  5. #5
    PeterLucas Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote in news:48966af2$0$1830$c3e8da3
    @news.astraweb.com:

    > James wrote:
    >> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >>
    >> In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    >> had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    >> really polluted.

    >
    > Not from the Lower Rio Grande! Especially not since all the agri-land
    > run off from hurricane Dolly. UGH!
    >



    Hmmmmmm, seems to be a worldwide thing.

    I'd never eat a fish from the Brisbane River. I have eaten Mud Crab from
    the river, but that was about 15+ years ago.

    I think most of the fish in the river have 3 eyes, anyway :-)

    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia


    If we are not meant to eat animals,
    why are they made of meat?

  6. #6
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    > James wrote:
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?


    Five years ago I was walking through the kitchen at work and the guy
    that caught and cooked this catfish poked a forkful at me. I'm kind
    of like Pavlov's puppy: wave food at my mouth and I just swallow and
    ask what it was later. To this day I have never eaten another bite of
    either fish from the Red River of the North OR catfish. And I have no
    intention of deviating from that position.

    Lynn in Fargo
    Wouldn't swim in the damn thing either. Prefer the Missouri.


  7. #7
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >> James wrote:
    >> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?

    >
    > Five years ago I was walking through the kitchen at work and the guy
    > that caught and cooked this catfish poked a forkful at me. I'm kind
    > of like Pavlov's puppy: wave food at my mouth and I just swallow and
    > ask what it was later. To this day I have never eaten another bite of
    > either fish from the Red River of the North OR catfish. And I have no
    > intention of deviating from that position.


    What did it taste like?



  8. #8
    aem Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    On Aug 3, 6:27*pm, James <j0069b...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    > ....

    Haven't had the chance since I left Alaska. Pity. -aem

  9. #9
    Janet Baraclough Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    The message
    <[email protected]>
    from James <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?


    Yes

    Janet (Scotland)

  10. #10
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    James <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?


    Yep.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  11. #11
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    On Sun, 3 Aug 2008 18:27:55 -0700 (PDT), James <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    >In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    >had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    >really polluted.



    I expecxt it's pollution. The Michigan DNR recomends that children under the age of 13
    and women of child bearing age not eat fish caught in the inland lakes and rivers at
    all.

    The main pollutants seem to be lead, mercury, trichlorethane, acetone and PCB's. Good
    stuff Maynerd.



  12. #12
    George Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sun, 3 Aug 2008 18:27:55 -0700 (PDT), James <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >>
    >> In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    >> had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    >> really polluted.

    >
    >
    > I expecxt it's pollution. The Michigan DNR recomends that children under the age of 13
    > and women of child bearing age not eat fish caught in the inland lakes and rivers at
    > all.
    >
    > The main pollutants seem to be lead, mercury, trichlorethane, acetone and PCB's. Good
    > stuff Maynerd.
    >
    >

    PA says this:

    Note: All sportfish taken from Pennsylvania waters by recreational
    angling are subject to a one-meal-per-week consumption advisory. The
    statewide advisory does not apply to fish from commercial sources,
    including private fish farms, restaurants and markets.

    And then:

    CLEANING AND COOKING YOUR FISH
    PCBs and most other organic contaminants usually build up in a fish’s
    fat deposits and just underneath the skin. By removing the skin and fat
    before cooking, you can reduce the levels of these chemicals. Mercury,
    however, collects in the fish’s muscle and cannot be reduced by cleaning
    and cooking methods. To reduce PCBs and other organics:
    • Remove all skin.
    • Slice off fat belly meat along the bottom of the fish.
    • Cut away any fat above the fish’s backbone.
    • Cut away the V-shaped wedge of fat along the lateral line on each side
    of the fish.
    • Bake or broil trimmed fish on a rack or grill so some of the remaining
    fat drips away.
    • Discard any drippings. Do not eat them or use them for cooking other
    foods, or in preparing other sauces.

  13. #13
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    On Aug 3, 8:27*pm, James <j0069b...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    > In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. *It
    > had a gasoline smell to it. *Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    > really polluted.


    Never. Especially now, when flood waters still abound in our rivers.
    I might eat trout from a trout stream, but that's about it. Iowa has
    some of the worst waterways (pollution-wise) in the country, mostly
    because of the agribusiness and corporate factory farms.

    N.

  14. #14
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    On Aug 3, 9:51*pm, "cybercat" <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Lynn from Fargo" <lynng...@i29.net> wrote in messagenews:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >
    > >> James wrote:
    > >> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?

    >
    > > Five years ago I was walking through the kitchen at work and the guy
    > > that caught *and cooked this catfish poked a forkful at me. I'm kind
    > > of like Pavlov's puppy: *wave food at my mouth and I just swallow and
    > > ask what it was later. *To this day I have never eaten another bite of
    > > either fish from the Red River of the North OR catfish. And I have no
    > > intention of deviating from that position.

    >
    > What did it taste like?


    It was very hot (temperature, not spice) but I remember it tasted
    muddy - of course, that's what I always expected catfish to taste
    like and the Red River has a clay bottom.
    Lynn in Fargo


  15. #15
    Phluge Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    "James" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    > In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    > had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    > really polluted.


    Being formerly from NJ I know most large rivers around there were polluted
    and it wouldn't surprise me if there was a bad smell to an eel if it wasn't
    cleaned up well. Being one who has eaten a lot of river/stream eels, I never
    had one that smelled like gasoline. There has been a tremendous turnaround
    on the Hudson, Delaware, and other large rivers around there since the 60's
    due to some very influential environmental groups.

    That said, fish from rivers is not toxic per se, you need to take into
    account the specific DNR recommendations for that river, where the fish were
    caught (downstream of a riverside factory is not a plus), the fishes
    position in the food chain, whether you are pregnant, and all that stuff.
    Flooded rivers in Iowa have sewage in them -- like the farmed fish imported
    from Vietnam are raised in.

    I now live in Minnesota where there are much less restrictive cautions about
    eating fish -- but still you don't eat it everyday. Unless you do I wouldn't
    worry if I were you.




  16. #16
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    "Lynn from Fargo" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:368ff744-f719-4648-a4ef-1956aef10e7c@k37[email protected]..
    On Aug 3, 9:51 pm, "cybercat" <cyberpu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "Lynn from Fargo" <lynng...@i29.net> wrote in
    > messagenews:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    >
    > >> James wrote:
    > >> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?

    >
    > > Five years ago I was walking through the kitchen at work and the guy
    > > that caught and cooked this catfish poked a forkful at me. I'm kind
    > > of like Pavlov's puppy: wave food at my mouth and I just swallow and
    > > ask what it was later. To this day I have never eaten another bite of
    > > either fish from the Red River of the North OR catfish. And I have no
    > > intention of deviating from that position.

    >
    > What did it taste like?


    >It was very hot (temperature, not spice) but I remember it tasted
    >muddy - of course, that's what I always expected catfish to taste
    >like and the Red River has a clay bottom.



    It's so funny, catfish to me tastes very clean. "Earthy," but clean.



  17. #17
    ntantiques Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    On Aug 3, 6:27 pm, James <j0069b...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >
    > In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    > had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    > really polluted.


    You bet - Oregon's McKenzie River just got a great report & it's full
    of happy trout. http://www.registerguard.com/csp/cms...viewStory.cls?
    cid=124507&sid=1&fid=1

    Nancy T

  18. #18
    none Guest

    Default Re: River fish

    Kathleen wrote:
    > James wrote:
    >> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >>
    >> In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    >> had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    >> really polluted.

    >
    > I don't believe I'd eat fish from the Missouri or Mississippi. Not real
    > sure about the Meramec, either. I guess it would depend where along it
    > the fish were caught, and if there'd been recent flooding that washed
    > all kinds of god knows what into the water.
    >
    > I'd have to pass on fish caught from at least one nearby creek. The
    > stable hands at the local barn were puking sick after one of their camp
    > outs and bonfires, and they swore it was from the fish they caught and
    > ate. And it might even have been true. They'd been swimming in that
    > creek with their horses and dogs and by the end of the day that water
    > was probably more like "mud & mammal tea" But my money was on the
    > whiskey and pepsi, with dirty hands running a close second.
    >


    The upper Yakima river in Washington State? Yes, if the law wasn't
    watching. It's catch-and-release... A good fly-fishing trout river.

    The lower Yakima river, where it's legal to keep what you've caught? Oh,
    heck no... That's after the river's been through hundreds of miles of
    muddy farmland. Catfish and bass country.

    The state is trying to protect the fish and kill the less wise citizens,
    is all I can figure.

  19. #19
    Mike Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    "none" <""Mark\"@(none)"> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Kathleen wrote:
    >> James wrote:
    >>> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >>>
    >>> In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    >>> had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    >>> really polluted.

    >>
    >> I don't believe I'd eat fish from the Missouri or Mississippi. Not real
    >> sure about the Meramec, either. I guess it would depend where along it
    >> the fish were caught, and if there'd been recent flooding that washed all
    >> kinds of god knows what into the water.
    >>
    >> I'd have to pass on fish caught from at least one nearby creek. The
    >> stable hands at the local barn were puking sick after one of their camp
    >> outs and bonfires, and they swore it was from the fish they caught and
    >> ate. And it might even have been true. They'd been swimming in that
    >> creek with their horses and dogs and by the end of the day that water was
    >> probably more like "mud & mammal tea" But my money was on the whiskey
    >> and pepsi, with dirty hands running a close second.
    >>

    >
    > The upper Yakima river in Washington State? Yes, if the law wasn't
    > watching. It's catch-and-release... A good fly-fishing trout river.
    >
    > The lower Yakima river, where it's legal to keep what you've caught? Oh,
    > heck no... That's after the river's been through hundreds of miles of
    > muddy farmland. Catfish and bass country.
    >
    > The state is trying to protect the fish and kill the less wise citizens,
    > is all I can figure.


    how about the Naches river?



  20. #20
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: River fish


    "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "none" <""Mark\"@(none)"> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Kathleen wrote:
    >>> James wrote:
    >>>> Would you eat fish you caught from your local rivers?
    >>>>
    >>>> In the 60's I had a bit of an eel from the Hudson River in NYC. It
    >>>> had a gasoline smell to it. Don't know if that's natural or if it was
    >>>> really polluted.
    >>>
    >>> I don't believe I'd eat fish from the Missouri or Mississippi. Not real
    >>> sure about the Meramec, either. I guess it would depend where along it
    >>> the fish were caught, and if there'd been recent flooding that washed
    >>> all kinds of god knows what into the water.
    >>>
    >>> I'd have to pass on fish caught from at least one nearby creek. The
    >>> stable hands at the local barn were puking sick after one of their camp
    >>> outs and bonfires, and they swore it was from the fish they caught and
    >>> ate. And it might even have been true. They'd been swimming in that
    >>> creek with their horses and dogs and by the end of the day that water
    >>> was probably more like "mud & mammal tea" But my money was on the
    >>> whiskey and pepsi, with dirty hands running a close second.
    >>>

    >>
    >> The upper Yakima river in Washington State? Yes, if the law wasn't
    >> watching. It's catch-and-release... A good fly-fishing trout river.
    >>
    >> The lower Yakima river, where it's legal to keep what you've caught? Oh,
    >> heck no... That's after the river's been through hundreds of miles of
    >> muddy farmland. Catfish and bass country.
    >>
    >> The state is trying to protect the fish and kill the less wise citizens,
    >> is all I can figure.

    >
    > how about the Naches river?
    >


    Where there's no safe water, there's no safe fish. I don't really think
    there's a good reason to believe that the water anywhere is safe.



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