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Thread: Rice Bread

  1. #1
    Omelet Guest

    Default Rice Bread

    With testing, I've found that I seem to have a greater tolerance for
    rice than wheat. Wheat places my triglyceride levels into the low 300's.
    Rice does not do this. They stay below 100 with reasonable consumption.
    I already knew I had a wheat/gluten intolerance but it appears that
    there is more than one reason to avoid it. <g>

    I've done some googling for rice breads already and there seems to be a
    few good recipes, none of which I've tried yet. Once I can get off of
    strict low carbing, I'd like to be able to enjoy, say, a rice based
    English muffin from time to time with some of Barb's award winning jams,
    so I'm planning ahead!

    Has anyone here ever tried making rice bread and if so, do you have a
    recipe you are willing to share?

    Brown Rice (and other whole grain varieties) also has a lower glycemic
    index than wheat.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  2. #2
    ffu Guest

    Default REC Re: Rice Bread

    On Mon, 14 Sep 2009 07:53:05 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    -->Has anyone here ever tried making rice bread and if so, do you have a
    -->recipe you are willing to share?
    -->Brown Rice (and other whole grain varieties) also has a lower glycemic
    -->index than wheat.




    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Wild Rice Bread or Breadsticks (1 1/2-Pound Recipe)

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 15 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Bread

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 1/8 cups water (70 to 80F)
    1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    1 1/2 tablespoons molasses
    2 1/2 cups bread flour
    3/4 cup whole wheat flour
    1 1/2 teaspoons fennel seed (optional)
    1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    3/4 cup cooked wild rice or brown rice
    1 1/2 teaspoons Fleischmann's Bread Machine Yeast

    SELECT loaf size recommended by the manufacturer of your machine.

    MEASURE all ingredients into bread machine pan in the order that the bread
    machine manufacturer suggests.

    PROCESS in basic/white or rapid bake cycle; medium/normal color setting. Remove
    baked bread from pan and cool on wire rack. Makes 1 loaf, or 15 breadsticks.

    ------------------------------------------------
    TO MAKE BREADSTICKS:
    Select loaf size and measure ingredients into pan as directed above. Process in
    dough/manual cycle.

    When cycle is complete, remove dough from machine to floured surface. If
    necessary, knead in enough bread flour to make dough easy to handle.

    Roll dough to 15- 9-inch rectangle; cut into 15 (1-inch) strips. Holding ends
    of each strip, twist in opposite directions 4 times. Repeat with remaining
    dough. Place on two large greased baking sheets. Cover; let rise in warm,
    draft-free place until slightly risen, about 5 to 15 minutes.

    Lightly beat 1 egg; brush on breadsticks. Bake at 375F for 15 to 20 minutes or
    until golden brown, switching positions of sheets halfway through baking for
    even browning. Remove from baking sheets and cool on wire racks.

    Source: "Fleischmann's Yeast"

    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 130 Calories; 2g Fat (13.3% calories
    from fat); 4g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol;
    216mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other
    Carbohydrates.

    NOTES : Use 1-pound recipe if your bread machine pan holds 8 cups or less
    water.




    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Wild Rice Bread or Breadsticks (1-Pound Recipe)

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 12 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Bread

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    3/4 cup water (70 to 80F)
    1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    1 tablespoon molasses
    1 2/3 cups bread flour
    1/2 cup whole wheat flour
    1 teaspoon fennel seed (optional)
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/2 cup cooked wild rice or brown rice
    1 teaspoon Fleischmann's Bread Machine Yeast

    SELECT loaf size recommended by the manufacturer of your machine.

    MEASURE all ingredients into bread machine pan in the order that the bread
    machine manufacturer suggests.

    PROCESS in basic/white or rapid bake cycle; medium/normal color setting. Remove
    baked bread from pan and cool on wire rack. Makes 1 loaf, or 10 breadsticks.

    -----------------------------------------

    TO MAKE BREADSTICKS:
    Select loaf size and measure ingredients into pan as directed above. Process in
    dough/manual cycle.

    When cycle is complete, remove dough from machine to floured surface. If
    necessary, knead in enough bread flour to make dough easy to handle.

    Roll dough to 10- 9-inch rectangle; cut into 10 (1-inch) strips. Holding ends
    of each strip, twist in opposite directions 4 times. Repeat with remaining
    dough. Place on two large greased baking sheets. Cover; let rise in warm,
    draft-free place until slightly risen, about 5 to 15 minutes.

    Lightly beat 1 egg; brush on breadsticks. Bake at 375F for 15 to 20 minutes or
    until golden brown, switching positions of sheets halfway through baking for
    even browning. Remove from baking sheets and cool on wire racks.

    Source: "Fleischmann's Yeast"

    Yield: "1 loaf"
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 109 Calories; 2g Fat (13.3% calories
    from fat); 3g Protein; 20g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol;
    180mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other
    Carbohydrates.

    NOTES : Use 1-pound recipe if your bread machine pan holds 8 cups or less
    water.

  3. #3
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    That has wheat which I am trying to totally exclude...

    but thanks anyway.


    In article <[email protected]>,
    ffu <[email protected]> wrote:

    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Wild Rice Bread or Breadsticks (1 1/2-Pound Recipe)
    >
    > Recipe By :
    > Serving Size : 15 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : Bread
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 1 1/8 cups water (70 to 80F)
    > 1 1/2 tablespoons vegetable oil
    > 1 1/2 tablespoons molasses
    > 2 1/2 cups bread flour
    > 3/4 cup whole wheat flour
    > 1 1/2 teaspoons fennel seed (optional)
    > 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
    > 3/4 cup cooked wild rice or brown rice
    > 1 1/2 teaspoons Fleischmann's Bread Machine Yeast
    >
    > SELECT loaf size recommended by the manufacturer of your machine.
    >
    > MEASURE all ingredients into bread machine pan in the order that the bread
    > machine manufacturer suggests.
    >
    > PROCESS in basic/white or rapid bake cycle; medium/normal color setting.
    > Remove
    > baked bread from pan and cool on wire rack. Makes 1 loaf, or 15 breadsticks.
    >
    > ------------------------------------------------
    > TO MAKE BREADSTICKS:
    > Select loaf size and measure ingredients into pan as directed above. Process
    > in
    > dough/manual cycle.
    >
    > When cycle is complete, remove dough from machine to floured surface. If
    > necessary, knead in enough bread flour to make dough easy to handle.
    >
    > Roll dough to 15- 9-inch rectangle; cut into 15 (1-inch) strips. Holding
    > ends
    > of each strip, twist in opposite directions 4 times. Repeat with remaining
    > dough. Place on two large greased baking sheets. Cover; let rise in warm,
    > draft-free place until slightly risen, about 5 to 15 minutes.
    >
    > Lightly beat 1 egg; brush on breadsticks. Bake at 375F for 15 to 20 minutes
    > or
    > until golden brown, switching positions of sheets halfway through baking for
    > even browning. Remove from baking sheets and cool on wire racks.
    >
    > Source: "Fleischmann's Yeast"
    >
    > - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    >
    > Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 130 Calories; 2g Fat (13.3% calories
    > from fat); 4g Protein; 24g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol;
    > 216mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1/2 Fat; 0 Other
    > Carbohydrates.
    >
    > NOTES : Use 1-pound recipe if your bread machine pan holds 8 cups or less
    > water.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > * Exported from MasterCook *
    >
    > Wild Rice Bread or Breadsticks (1-Pound Recipe)
    >
    > Recipe By :
    > Serving Size : 12 Preparation Time :0:00
    > Categories : Bread
    >
    > Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    > -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    > 3/4 cup water (70 to 80F)
    > 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
    > 1 tablespoon molasses
    > 1 2/3 cups bread flour
    > 1/2 cup whole wheat flour
    > 1 teaspoon fennel seed (optional)
    > 1 teaspoon salt
    > 1/2 cup cooked wild rice or brown rice
    > 1 teaspoon Fleischmann's Bread Machine Yeast
    >

    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  4. #4
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > That has wheat which I am trying to totally exclude...


    Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.

    Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  5. #5
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Miche <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > That has wheat which I am trying to totally exclude...

    >
    > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.
    >
    > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.
    >
    > Miche


    Just wheat specifically and related grains, including spelt, oats,
    barley etc. Rice and corn seem to be the only grains I can tolerate.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  6. #6
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Rice Bread

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > With testing, I've found that I seem to have a greater tolerance for
    > rice than wheat. Wheat places my triglyceride levels into the low 300's.
    > Rice does not do this. They stay below 100 with reasonable consumption.
    > I already knew I had a wheat/gluten intolerance but it appears that
    > there is more than one reason to avoid it. <g>


    My intolerance to wheat is much more specific than yours.
    I can eat bread that's made from 100% rye (imported Danish
    or German generally), oatmeal, beer made from barley so any
    but wheat beers.

    > I've done some googling for rice breads already and there seems to be a
    > few good recipes, none of which I've tried yet. Once I can get off of
    > strict low carbing, I'd like to be able to enjoy, say, a rice based
    > English muffin from time to time with some of Barb's award winning jams,
    > so I'm planning ahead!


    I have tried rice based breads from N-ergy and other brands
    from Whole Foods or Fruitful Harvest. Unimpressed. I stick
    with the 100% rye stuff and have a slice most weeks and keep
    the "loaf" (more accurately called a tasty brick) in the freezer.

    > Has anyone here ever tried making rice bread and if so, do you have a
    > recipe you are willing to share?


    Rice pizza crust is okay. Pre-mixed kit from Red Mill. Should
    be able to make a loaf out of it.

    > Brown Rice (and other whole grain varieties) also has a lower glycemic
    > index than wheat.


    And it's filling.

  7. #7
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    Miche wrote:
    >
    > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.


    On the other hand if it's the only bread you can have,
    sucks can beat doesn't exist.

    > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.


    My intolerance is more wheat specific than Om's but for
    me spelt triggers the same symptoms. So does kamut.
    Both are sometimes described as "undomesticated wheat".

    I've found bread made from millet in freezer section of
    Fruitful Yield or other health food specialty shops.
    Sweeter than I like but better than the rice bread that
    I would decide as "dusty".

    I've also found both bread and pasta made from quinoa.
    I even learned how to pronounce it - keen-wah.

    Cornbread can be made from corn without wheat. I have
    some last week. Make a whole pan of it. Eat two pieces
    in 4 days. The rest gets stale and gets trashed. All
    in all it worked fine. Two pieces of bread in the same
    week is more than my usual but not that much more.

  8. #8
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <h8m9k6$ito$[email protected]>,
    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Miche wrote:
    > >
    > > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.

    >
    > On the other hand if it's the only bread you can have,
    > sucks can beat doesn't exist.


    You can't use cornflour/cornstarch? My standard GF bread uses it and
    potato flour:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...ng-white-bread
    >
    > > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.

    >
    > My intolerance is more wheat specific than Om's but for
    > me spelt triggers the same symptoms. So does kamut.
    > Both are sometimes described as "undomesticated wheat".


    Spelt's fine for me but I can't tolerate kamut either. A pity -- I
    liked a lot when I tried it, but it didn't like me.

    > I've found bread made from millet in freezer section of
    > Fruitful Yield or other health food specialty shops.
    > Sweeter than I like but better than the rice bread that
    > I would decide as "dusty".


    Most of the rice breads I've tried have been too damp, rather than
    dusty. And I really dislike the taste.

    > I've also found both bread and pasta made from quinoa.
    > I even learned how to pronounce it - keen-wah.


    I want to like quinoa more than I do. I'm sure I'll hit on the recipe
    that makes me love it sooner or later.

    > Cornbread can be made from corn without wheat. I have
    > some last week. Make a whole pan of it. Eat two pieces
    > in 4 days. The rest gets stale and gets trashed. All
    > in all it worked fine. Two pieces of bread in the same
    > week is more than my usual but not that much more.


    Wrap the rest individually and freeze them?

    How do you like polenta?

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  9. #9
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Miche <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > That has wheat which I am trying to totally exclude...

    > >
    > > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.
    > >
    > > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.


    > Just wheat specifically and related grains, including spelt, oats,
    > barley etc. Rice and corn seem to be the only grains I can tolerate.


    Then check the recipe here:

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...ng-white-bread

    which is a really good one.

    (Seriously, I'm pimping that recipe everywhere -- it's the best truly
    gluten-free bread I've ever had.)

    I'm trying to see if I can generalise from the bread recipe to other
    products. I've made good pancakes and passable scones out of it, too.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  10. #10
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    Miche wrote:
    > Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Cornbread can be made from corn without wheat. I had
    >> some last week. Made a whole pan of it. Ate two pieces
    >> in 4 days. The rest got stale and was trashed. All
    >> in all it worked fine. Two pieces of bread in the same
    >> week is more than my usual but not that much more.

    >
    > Wrap the rest individually and freeze them?


    I wrap and freeze my 100% rye bread. Cornbread doesn't
    seem to freeze well enough - It ends up soggy when I
    thaw it.

    > How do you like polenta?


    It's okay. If I want carby mush I'll mash rutabagas or
    potatoes more likely. Maybe I'll go have a tamale for
    lunch and prove myself wrong on this point ...

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <h8m9k6$ito$[email protected]>,
    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Miche wrote:
    > >
    > > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.

    >
    > On the other hand if it's the only bread you can have,
    > sucks can beat doesn't exist.
    >
    > > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.

    >
    > My intolerance is more wheat specific than Om's but for
    > me spelt triggers the same symptoms. So does kamut.
    > Both are sometimes described as "undomesticated wheat".


    It does to me too. Anything that is included in a gluten free diet. That
    includes spelt, oats and barley.

    >
    > I've found bread made from millet in freezer section of
    > Fruitful Yield or other health food specialty shops.
    > Sweeter than I like but better than the rice bread that
    > I would decide as "dusty".
    >
    > I've also found both bread and pasta made from quinoa.
    > I even learned how to pronounce it - keen-wah.


    Pasta made from rice and corn at the health food store works. Corn
    noodles for lasagna by DeBoles work well.

    >
    > Cornbread can be made from corn without wheat.


    I have some recipes on file. ;-)

    > I have
    > some last week. Make a whole pan of it. Eat two pieces
    > in 4 days. The rest gets stale and gets trashed. All
    > in all it worked fine. Two pieces of bread in the same
    > week is more than my usual but not that much more.


    I eat a small amount of wheat bread any more maybe a couple of times per
    year...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  12. #12
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    Doug Freyburger wrote:

    > I wrap and freeze my 100% rye bread. Cornbread doesn't
    > seem to freeze well enough - It ends up soggy when I
    > thaw it.

    [snip]

    My cornbread freezes (and thaws) fine--esp. since I reheat it.
    --
    Jean B.

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Miche <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Miche <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > That has wheat which I am trying to totally exclude...
    > > >
    > > > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.
    > > >
    > > > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > > > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.

    >
    > > Just wheat specifically and related grains, including spelt, oats,
    > > barley etc. Rice and corn seem to be the only grains I can tolerate.

    >
    > Then check the recipe here:
    >
    > http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...ng-white-bread
    >
    > which is a really good one.
    >
    > (Seriously, I'm pimping that recipe everywhere -- it's the best truly
    > gluten-free bread I've ever had.)
    >
    > I'm trying to see if I can generalise from the bread recipe to other
    > products. I've made good pancakes and passable scones out of it, too.
    >
    > Miche


    The trick is, where the hell does one get xanthan gum other than on line
    ordering? ;-) I must look for it. It should also be good as a low carb
    thickener for soups and sauces.

    4 tsp soya flour
    50g potato starch
    300g cornflour
    1 tsp xanthan gum
    25g psyllium husk powder
    2 tsp instant yeast
    1 tsp salt
    1 tbsp caster sugar
    2 tsp vinegar
    15ml sunflower oil, plus extra for brushing
    2 tbsp yogurt
    325ml warm water
    30ml milk

    Put the dry ingredients in a bowl, whisk the liquid separately, then mix
    the two really well for a minute, until they come together into a soft
    dough. Leave for an hour, then, using a lightly oiled worktop and hands,
    shape into rolls or into a baton for a tin loaf. Cover and leave for an
    hour and a half, until almost doubled.

    Gluten-free dough doesn't have spring, so a very hot oven helps - 245C
    (220C fan-assisted)/475F/gas mark 9. Brush the top of the dough with oil
    and bake for 25 minutes (rolls) or 50 minutes (large tin loaf). Remove
    from the oven, and from the tin or tray, and leave to cool on a wire
    rack, covered with a cloth - this helps keep the bread soft.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Rice Bread

    In article <h8m7ml$31a$[email protected]>,
    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > With testing, I've found that I seem to have a greater tolerance for
    > > rice than wheat. Wheat places my triglyceride levels into the low 300's.
    > > Rice does not do this. They stay below 100 with reasonable consumption.
    > > I already knew I had a wheat/gluten intolerance but it appears that
    > > there is more than one reason to avoid it. <g>

    >
    > My intolerance to wheat is much more specific than yours.
    > I can eat bread that's made from 100% rye (imported Danish
    > or German generally), oatmeal, beer made from barley so any
    > but wheat beers.
    >
    > > I've done some googling for rice breads already and there seems to be a
    > > few good recipes, none of which I've tried yet. Once I can get off of
    > > strict low carbing, I'd like to be able to enjoy, say, a rice based
    > > English muffin from time to time with some of Barb's award winning jams,
    > > so I'm planning ahead!

    >
    > I have tried rice based breads from N-ergy and other brands
    > from Whole Foods or Fruitful Harvest. Unimpressed. I stick
    > with the 100% rye stuff and have a slice most weeks and keep
    > the "loaf" (more accurately called a tasty brick) in the freezer.
    >
    > > Has anyone here ever tried making rice bread and if so, do you have a
    > > recipe you are willing to share?

    >
    > Rice pizza crust is okay. Pre-mixed kit from Red Mill. Should
    > be able to make a loaf out of it.
    >
    > > Brown Rice (and other whole grain varieties) also has a lower glycemic
    > > index than wheat.

    >
    > And it's filling.


    I'll be answering that most recent e-mail a bit later, but in answer to
    that, I do NOT purchase white rice. Only brown, red and black.

    Pressure cookers are the gods for cooking those types of rice and I've
    had no trouble doing so over the past several years. :-)

    Bring up to pressure, time for 30 minutes, quick cool the lid under tap
    water.

    Cook in stock for more flavor...


    And, thanks. I appreciate the time it took to send those e-mails. I see
    you have researched the subject more than I have! It is valuable
    information...
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  15. #15
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > The trick is, where the hell does one get xanthan gum other than on line
    > ordering? ;-) I must look for it. It should also be good as a low carb
    > thickener for soups and sauces.


    I see it at Fruitful Yield and other health food specialty shops.

  16. #16
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <h8op9d$4e4$[email protected]>,
    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > The trick is, where the hell does one get xanthan gum other than on line
    > > ordering? ;-) I must look for it. It should also be good as a low carb
    > > thickener for soups and sauces.

    >
    > I see it at Fruitful Yield and other health food specialty shops.


    Our local shop is Cornucopia. In Austin, I have Whole foods, Central
    Market and Sun Harvest.

    I'll czech them out, thanks.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <7ha9smF2ral7f[email protected]>,
    Becca <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > > The trick is, where the hell does one get xanthan gum other than on line
    > > ordering? ;-) I must look for it. It should also be good as a low carb
    > > thickener for soups and sauces.

    >
    > A couple of health food stores here in town have xanthan gum. It was
    > $9.95 for a small bag, which should last you almost forever. I use it to
    > thicken salad dressings, I use about 1/8th teaspoon for a tradition size
    > bottle of salad dressing. It may not look very thick at first, but after
    > it chills it gets thicker. It is tricky getting xanthan gum to mix with
    > liquids, because it tries to clump up. You have to shake, shake, shake
    > the bottle. I have also used a wire whisk.
    >
    >
    > Becca


    Cool, thanks for the advice! I've never used it yet.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  18. #18
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    Omelet wrote:
    > The trick is, where the hell does one get xanthan gum other than on line
    > ordering? ;-) I must look for it. It should also be good as a low carb
    > thickener for soups and sauces.


    A couple of health food stores here in town have xanthan gum. It was
    $9.95 for a small bag, which should last you almost forever. I use it to
    thicken salad dressings, I use about 1/8th teaspoon for a tradition size
    bottle of salad dressing. It may not look very thick at first, but after
    it chills it gets thicker. It is tricky getting xanthan gum to mix with
    liquids, because it tries to clump up. You have to shake, shake, shake
    the bottle. I have also used a wire whisk.


    Becca

  19. #19
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Miche <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > Miche <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > > > Omelet <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > > That has wheat which I am trying to totally exclude...
    > > > >
    > > > > Om, I've never found a rice bread that didn't suck.
    > > > >
    > > > > Are you just trying to avoid wheat, or all gluten-bearing grains? If
    > > > > other gluten-bearing grains are okay, try spelt.

    > >
    > > > Just wheat specifically and related grains, including spelt, oats,
    > > > barley etc. Rice and corn seem to be the only grains I can tolerate.

    > >
    > > Then check the recipe here:
    > >
    > > http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandsty...ng-white-bread
    > >
    > > which is a really good one.
    > >
    > > (Seriously, I'm pimping that recipe everywhere -- it's the best truly
    > > gluten-free bread I've ever had.)
    > >
    > > I'm trying to see if I can generalise from the bread recipe to other
    > > products. I've made good pancakes and passable scones out of it, too.

    >
    > The trick is, where the hell does one get xanthan gum other than on line
    > ordering? ;-)


    Huh. I can buy it in my supermarket. Try your local hippie health food
    shop.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  20. #20
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: REC Re: Rice Bread

    In article <h8ohtu$a6e$[email protected]>,
    Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Miche wrote:
    > > Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Cornbread can be made from corn without wheat. I had
    > >> some last week. Made a whole pan of it. Ate two pieces
    > >> in 4 days. The rest got stale and was trashed. All
    > >> in all it worked fine. Two pieces of bread in the same
    > >> week is more than my usual but not that much more.

    > >
    > > Wrap the rest individually and freeze them?

    >
    > I wrap and freeze my 100% rye bread. Cornbread doesn't
    > seem to freeze well enough - It ends up soggy when I
    > thaw it.


    Oh, that's unfortunate.

    > > How do you like polenta?

    >
    > It's okay. If I want carby mush I'll mash rutabagas or
    > potatoes more likely. Maybe I'll go have a tamale for
    > lunch and prove myself wrong on this point ...


    I make polenta and pour it onto a tray (or into a pan) to cool. When
    it's cooled it can be cut up and fried or grilled to use as a substrate
    for other things.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

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