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Thread: Rice

  1. #1
    Ed Warren Guest

    Default Rice

    I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    rinsed it well before hand.

    Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?

    Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    buy in a zippered burlap bag?

    Thank you,
    Ed Warren



  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Ed Warren wrote:
    > I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    > separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    > basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    > purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    > conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    > halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    > rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    > buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Ed Warren
    >
    >

    Basmati rice is always much drier than others. I very rarely use jasmine
    so I have no idea.

  3. #3
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    On Mar 26, 5:36*pm, "Ed Warren" <e-war...@att.net> wrote:
    > I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. *For the fried rice, I need nice
    > separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. *For years I have used
    > basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. *Recently I
    > purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. *By NEW I mean recently harvested. *The
    > conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    > halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. *I
    > rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    > buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Ed Warren


    Most recipes I see call for SOAKING basmati, not just rinsing. If you
    absolutely must have separate grains use Uncle Ben's "converted"
    rice. I know this is anathema to lots of posters but to me it tastes
    fine and never fails.
    Lynn in Fargo
    packing to evacuate . . . probably

  4. #4
    phil..c Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:
    > On Mar 26, 5:36 pm, "Ed Warren" <e-war...@att.net> wrote:
    >> I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    >> separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    >> basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    >> purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    >> conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    >> halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    >> rinsed it well before hand.
    >>
    >> Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >>
    >> Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    >> buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >>
    >> Thank you,
    >> Ed Warren

    >
    > Most recipes I see call for SOAKING basmati, not just rinsing. If you
    > absolutely must have separate grains use Uncle Ben's "converted"
    > rice. I know this is anathema to lots of posters but to me it tastes
    > fine and never fails.
    > Lynn in Fargo
    > packing to evacuate . . . probably


    Easiest way is to cook the rice you are going to use for fried rice
    the day before.
    That way whatever type it dries out a bit and the grains separate
    much easier .

    Or put into the freezer within a container and no cover seal or lid

    works a treat

  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Ed Warren <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    > separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    > basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    > purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    > conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    > halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    > rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    > buy in a zippered burlap bag?


    Why not just cook it according to directions? You're trying way to
    hard to cook rice.

    -sw

  6. #6
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    "phil..c" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:
    >> On Mar 26, 5:36 pm, "Ed Warren" <e-war...@att.net> wrote:
    >>> I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    >>> separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    >>> basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    >>> purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    >>> conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    >>> halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    >>> rinsed it well before hand.
    >>>
    >>> Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >>>
    >>> Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    >>> buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >>>
    >>> Thank you,
    >>> Ed Warren

    >>
    >> Most recipes I see call for SOAKING basmati, not just rinsing. If you
    >> absolutely must have separate grains use Uncle Ben's "converted"
    >> rice. I know this is anathema to lots of posters but to me it tastes
    >> fine and never fails.
    >> Lynn in Fargo
    >> packing to evacuate . . . probably

    >
    > Easiest way is to cook the rice you are going to use for fried rice
    > the day before.
    > That way whatever type it dries out a bit and the grains separate
    > much easier .


    Yes - I forgot that part in my post. Rice for fried rice needs to
    be cooked as per usual - with the the FULL amount of water, t hen
    left to dry out a bit - usually in the fridge overnight, or if in a
    hurry, spread out on a cookie sheet in a low 200F oven for 15
    minutes, stir, then another 15 minutes.

    -sw

  7. #7
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Ed wrote on Thu, 26 Mar 2009 23:36:11 GMT:

    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?


    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I
    > always buy in a zippered burlap bag?


    I use a Japanese rice cooker and the amount of water for basmati is the
    same as for regular long grain. I do not wash rice before cooking since
    I do not usually buy imported rice.


    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  8. #8
    Ed Warren Guest

    Default Re: Rice


    "Ed Warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:LjUyl.490065$[email protected]..
    >I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    >separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    >basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    >purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    >conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    >halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    >rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I
    > always buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Ed Warren


    Thank you all, that helps
    Ed Warren



  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Omelet said...

    > Have you considered trying Brown rice?



    Om,

    Yep. I'm a big fan of TJs (trader joes) organic frozen instant brown rice!

    Takes three minutes to nuke two cups worth.

    Makes my vegelaya swing! Well not really but almost, kinda/sorta...?

    Andy

  10. #10
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    In article
    <LjUyl.490065$[email protected]>,
    "Ed Warren" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    > separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    > basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    > purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    > conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    > halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    > rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    > buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Ed Warren


    Have you considered trying Brown rice?
    --
    Peace! Om

    Life isn't about waiting for the storm to pass.
    It's about learning to dance in the rain.
    -- Anon.

  11. #11
    phaeton Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Ed Warren wrote:
    > I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    > separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    > basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    > purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    > conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    > halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    > rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I always
    > buy in a zippered burlap bag?
    >
    > Thank you,
    > Ed Warren
    >
    >



    If you want your rice to be non-sticky, add about about 1tbsp of oil
    (such as olive) per cup of dry rice to the water prior to boiling it.

    Twue Stowey.


    Me personally, I prefer the stickiness of Jasmine rice. Next time I buy
    rice I'm going to hit an Asian market and pick up one of those 25 pound
    bags.

    -J

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    On Fri, 27 Mar 2009 00:26:02 -0500, phaeton <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >If you want your rice to be non-sticky, add about about 1tbsp of oil
    >(such as olive) per cup of dry rice to the water prior to boiling it.
    >

    I can't imagine oil in steamed rice.
    >
    >
    >Me personally, I prefer the stickiness of Jasmine rice. Next time I buy
    >rice I'm going to hit an Asian market and pick up one of those 25 pound
    >bags.
    >

    Jasmine is long grain and it's not "sticky", but it becomes gluey if
    you add too much water and over cook it. Medium to short grain rice
    is the really good sticky stuff.



    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  13. #13
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Rice

    Ed Warren wrote:
    >
    > I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    > separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    > basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I


    Basmati rice (actually all rice, I think) is
    supposed to be aged for best results.

  14. #14
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Rice


    "Ed Warren" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:LjUyl.490065$[email protected]..
    >I cook a fair amount of Indonesian food. For the fried rice, I need nice
    >separate kernels that are not gummy or sticky. For years I have used
    >basmati rice which I suspect is fairly old when I get it. Recently I
    >purchased some NEW Jasmine rice. By NEW I mean recently harvested. The
    >conventional wisdom is that new rice needs less water, but even when I
    >halved the water and the rice did not fully cook, it was still gummy. I
    >rinsed it well before hand.
    >
    > Is it possible to have nice separate kernels from new Jasmine rice?
    >
    > Is there a type of rice that would be better than the basmati that I
    > always buy in a zippered burlap bag?



    I have better luck with rice now that I use the Alton Brown oven technique.
    Basically you bring the rice, water and salt (salt is really important) to a
    boil then into a 225F oven for 15 minutes. Then remove and let sit for 10
    minutes but do not open the lid, that will spoil everything. You almost
    always get really nice, fluffy rice. Jasmine rice is knd of sticky by
    nature and it almost always clumps together And you need less water than
    the package directions usually call for. I never use thr 2 to 1 ratio of
    water to rice anymore. For 2 cups of rice I use 2 and 3/4 cup water.



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