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Thread: Ribs

  1. #1
    Brian Christiansen Guest

    Default Ribs

    I have some ribs in the freezer. There are a plethora of recipes out there,
    and I have no idea which to pick. This recipe looks good:
    http://tinyurl.com/dxj69n, but i am just not certain. Whatever recipe I
    use, do I need to thaw them overnight in the refrigerator, as they are
    currently frozen, or does the long cooking over low heat take care of that.

    Or should I wrap them up in foil and braise them:
    http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/ba...ibs/32466.html. I have never
    cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.

    Brian Christiansen



  2. #2
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 12:30:30 -0700, "Brian Christiansen"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have some ribs in the freezer. There are a plethora of recipes out there,
    >and I have no idea which to pick. This recipe looks good:
    >http://tinyurl.com/dxj69n, but i am just not certain. Whatever recipe I
    >use, do I need to thaw them overnight in the refrigerator, as they are
    >currently frozen, or does the long cooking over low heat take care of that.
    >
    >Or should I wrap them up in foil and braise them:
    >http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/ba...ibs/32466.html. I have never
    >cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.
    >
    >Brian Christiansen
    >


    I cook them from frozen, and I slather them with the following mixture
    so the won't go dry. Half a bottle of beer, some melted butter, a 1/8
    cup of molasses and a 1/4 cup of brown sugar. My mother added some
    lemon juice, made it a sweet & sour of sorts.

  3. #3
    Brian Christiansen Guest

    Default Re: Ribs


    "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I cook them from frozen, and I slather them with the following mixture
    > so the won't go dry. Half a bottle of beer, some melted butter, a 1/8
    > cup of molasses and a 1/4 cup of brown sugar. My mother added some
    > lemon juice, made it a sweet & sour of sorts.


    Sounds simple enough but I have some follow up questions:

    Is the oven "low and slow" like in the other recipes - 250 or so for 1 1/2
    to 2 or so hours?

    Do you wrap them in foil like the AB video, so you cook them in roasting pan
    tented with foil ( I think I came across a recipe that did it that way), or
    do you just put them on a roasting tray?

    What about glazing them with the remainder of the glaze and putting them
    under a broiler for about 5 minutes as many recipes suggested?

    Brian Christiansen



  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    > "Stu" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>
    >> I cook them from frozen, and I slather them with the following mixture
    >> so the won't go dry. Half a bottle of beer, some melted butter, a 1/8
    >> cup of molasses and a 1/4 cup of brown sugar. My mother added some
    >> lemon juice, made it a sweet & sour of sorts.


    Now *that* sounds disgusting. Candied ribs?

    -sw

  5. #5
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 12:30:30 -0700, "Brian Christiansen"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have some ribs in the freezer. There are a plethora of recipes out there,
    > and I have no idea which to pick. This recipe looks good:
    > http://tinyurl.com/dxj69n, but i am just not certain. Whatever recipe I
    > use, do I need to thaw them overnight in the refrigerator, as they are
    > currently frozen, or does the long cooking over low heat take care of that.


    That does look good. I have a butt that I was going to slow cook,
    maybe I'll use that recipe - I don't have peach preserves, so I'd have
    to go shopping.
    >
    > Or should I wrap them up in foil and braise them:
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/ba...ibs/32466.html. I have never
    > cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.
    >

    I just put mine in a dish, cover it with foil the first half of
    cooking glaze them with mustard the last half of cooking.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  6. #6
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Ribs


    Brian Christiansen <brian_chris[email protected]> wrote:
    > I have some ribs in the freezer. There are a plethora of recipes out
    > there, and I have no idea which to pick. This recipe looks good:
    > http://tinyurl.com/dxj69n, but i am just not certain. Whatever
    > recipe I use, do I need to thaw them overnight in the refrigerator,
    > as they are currently frozen, or does the long cooking over low heat
    > take care of that.
    > Or should I wrap them up in foil and braise them:
    > http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/ba...ibs/32466.html. I have
    > never cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.
    >
    > Brian Christiansen


    I'm assuming you're not barbecuing or grilling them since you didn't say so.

    Thaw them first or it will be difficult to get seasonings to stick. Also,
    when you're ready to prep them, wash them under cold water if packed in
    cryo, and either way, dry them thoroughly with paper towels.

    That doesn't mean you can't prepare them the in a similar way as you would
    for the smoker. Here's a simplified version which would work in your oven.

    First, if you can, peel the backside membrane off. It's easier to grab if
    you use a paper towel. If you can't peel it, just score between the bones,
    being careful to only cut the membrane.

    Rub them with a small amount of prepared yellow mustard, not fancy stuff,
    just rub in enough to help the seasonings stick. I assure you it won't make
    the ribs taste like mustard, but it will help form a nice bark on the ribs.
    Now coat them by sprinkling on salt, (hickory salt will add some smoke
    flavor) pepper, granular garlic, paprika (smoked spanish strongly preferred,
    again for a little smoke flavor even in the oven) and even a little seasoned
    salt is ok, or any other seasonings you enjoy on pork.

    Season the back bone side first, then the meat side. Cook them on a rack in
    the oven, meat side up, 2-3 hours at 275, shorter time for loin backs,
    longer for spares. This distinction is important. Spares have more
    connective tissue which needs to be rendered out, a process which requires
    longer cooking.

    Resting the ribs with the seasoning on them is fine.

    Lay out double sheets of foil. Depending on if you want wet ribs, spread a
    little butter, sauce, and brown sugar on the foil, lay the ribs on face
    down, and close semi-tightly, but not so fully sealed as to steam the ribs.
    If you want dry ribs, just sprinkle a little more of your dry seasoning mix
    if desired.

    They should stay in the foil no more than an hour at 250F, probably less.
    Inspect them after about 30 minutes. You're looking for the meat to pull
    back from the bones about an inch. If you see them getting close to that
    point, pull them from the oven, open the foil, and turn them over in the
    foil so they are meat side up. If you did the wet method, try to save some
    of the juices to glaze the ribs. Alton Brown's method as shown in your video
    link works fine too.

    Return them to the oven meat side up up for 15-20 minutes to crisp up the
    surface a little, and if you used the wet method, this will set your glaze.
    You can add a little barbecue sauce to the glaze if you like, but do not put
    it on thick or you will just get gloppy ribs. If you want dry ribs you can
    still baste them going in if there is a little juice left in the foil.

    This is similar to the method my barbecue team would use to cook ribs in a
    competition, but of course without the smoke. If you're going to cook ribs
    indoors very much, I'd suggest you invest in one of those little oven smoke
    boxes and a good exhaust fan.

    This is essentially a braise. If you go with another foil braise recipe,
    like Alton Brown's, (which isn't really a true braise unless you do the
    following) I'd still brown them up in the oven before putting them in foil
    to braise like the first step in my method, even if for a shorter time. In
    his recipe he sets the glaze nicely, but the ribs are essentially steamed
    and so will not have that nice surface texture to the meat, only to the
    glaze.

    MartyB in KC



  7. #7
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Ribs


    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Brian Christiansen <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> I have some ribs in the freezer. There are a plethora of recipes out
    >> there, and I have no idea which to pick. This recipe looks good:
    >> http://tinyurl.com/dxj69n, but i am just not certain. Whatever
    >> recipe I use, do I need to thaw them overnight in the refrigerator,
    >> as they are currently frozen, or does the long cooking over low heat
    >> take care of that.
    >> Or should I wrap them up in foil and braise them:
    >> http://www.foodnetwork.com/videos/ba...ibs/32466.html. I have
    >> never cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.
    >>
    >> Brian Christiansen

    >
    > I'm assuming you're not barbecuing or grilling them since you didn't
    > say so.
    > Thaw them first or it will be difficult to get seasonings to stick.
    > Also, when you're ready to prep them, wash them under cold water if
    > packed in cryo, and either way, dry them thoroughly with paper towels.
    >
    > That doesn't mean you can't prepare them the in a similar way as you
    > would for the smoker. Here's a simplified version which would work in
    > your oven.
    > First, if you can, peel the backside membrane off. It's easier to
    > grab if you use a paper towel. If you can't peel it, just score
    > between the bones, being careful to only cut the membrane.
    >
    > Rub them with a small amount of prepared yellow mustard, not fancy
    > stuff, just rub in enough to help the seasonings stick. I assure you
    > it won't make the ribs taste like mustard, but it will help form a
    > nice bark on the ribs. Now coat them by sprinkling on salt, (hickory
    > salt will add some smoke flavor) pepper, granular garlic, paprika
    > (smoked spanish strongly preferred, again for a little smoke flavor
    > even in the oven) and even a little seasoned salt is ok, or any other
    > seasonings you enjoy on pork.
    > Season the back bone side first, then the meat side. Cook them on a
    > rack in the oven, meat side up, 2-3 hours at 275, shorter time for
    > loin backs, longer for spares. This distinction is important. Spares
    > have more connective tissue which needs to be rendered out, a process
    > which requires longer cooking.
    >
    > Resting the ribs with the seasoning on them is fine.
    >
    > Lay out double sheets of foil. Depending on if you want wet ribs,
    > spread a little butter, sauce, and brown sugar on the foil, lay the
    > ribs on face down, and close semi-tightly, but not so fully sealed as
    > to steam the ribs. If you want dry ribs, just sprinkle a little more
    > of your dry seasoning mix if desired.
    >
    > They should stay in the foil no more than an hour at 250F, probably
    > less. Inspect them after about 30 minutes. You're looking for the
    > meat to pull back from the bones about an inch. If you see them
    > getting close to that point, pull them from the oven, open the foil,
    > and turn them over in the foil so they are meat side up. If you did
    > the wet method, try to save some of the juices to glaze the ribs.
    > Alton Brown's method as shown in your video link works fine too.
    >
    > Return them to the oven meat side up up for 15-20 minutes to crisp up
    > the surface a little, and if you used the wet method, this will set
    > your glaze. You can add a little barbecue sauce to the glaze if you
    > like, but do not put it on thick or you will just get gloppy ribs. If
    > you want dry ribs you can still baste them going in if there is a
    > little juice left in the foil.
    > This is similar to the method my barbecue team would use to cook ribs
    > in a competition, but of course without the smoke. If you're going to
    > cook ribs indoors very much, I'd suggest you invest in one of those
    > little oven smoke boxes and a good exhaust fan.
    >
    > This is essentially a braise. If you go with another foil braise
    > recipe, like Alton Brown's, (which isn't really a true braise unless
    > you do the following) I'd still brown them up in the oven before
    > putting them in foil to braise like the first step in my method, even
    > if for a shorter time. In his recipe he sets the glaze nicely, but
    > the ribs are essentially steamed and so will not have that nice
    > surface texture to the meat, only to the glaze.
    >
    > MartyB in KC


    Following up, if you follow the Tyler Florence recipe (which he strangely
    calls barbecued, but they are not), I do not recommend you put his thick
    heavy tomato based sauce under a broiler for 5 minutes as he suggested,
    unless you've got a really really weak broiler. Otherwise the tomato and
    sugar components of the sauce will probably turn burnt and bitter rather
    than caramelizing into a nice glaze.

    MBKC



  8. #8
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On 11/30/2010 3:46 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >> "Stu"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>>
    >>> I cook them from frozen, and I slather them with the following mixture
    >>> so the won't go dry. Half a bottle of beer, some melted butter, a 1/8
    >>> cup of molasses and a 1/4 cup of brown sugar. My mother added some
    >>> lemon juice, made it a sweet& sour of sorts.

    >
    > Now *that* sounds disgusting. Candied ribs?
    >
    > -sw


    I agree.

    I defrost mine first, then put a dry rub on them and leave them wrapped
    in foil in the fridge all day. I "smoke" mine on the gas grill on the
    other side of the flames with the foil underneath. I put some hickory
    chunks in foil and poke a hole or two.

    Cook the ribs at about 325 on the cooker thermometer until done.

    Then, if anyone wants to sauce them up, I have home made sauce on the
    side. DH, just likes 'em plain.

    Maybe it's being Texan, but I just hate it when people crap up barbecue
    with weird sauces.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  9. #9
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 18:16:37 -0600, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 11/30/2010 3:46 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >>> "Stu"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>>
    >>>> I cook them from frozen, and I slather them with the following mixture
    >>>> so the won't go dry. Half a bottle of beer, some melted butter, a 1/8
    >>>> cup of molasses and a 1/4 cup of brown sugar. My mother added some
    >>>> lemon juice, made it a sweet& sour of sorts.

    >>
    >> Now *that* sounds disgusting. Candied ribs?
    >>
    >> -sw

    >
    >I agree.
    >
    >I defrost mine first, then put a dry rub on them and leave them wrapped
    >in foil in the fridge all day. I "smoke" mine on the gas grill on the
    >other side of the flames with the foil underneath. I put some hickory
    >chunks in foil and poke a hole or two.
    >
    >Cook the ribs at about 325 on the cooker thermometer until done.
    >
    >Then, if anyone wants to sauce them up, I have home made sauce on the
    >side. DH, just likes 'em plain.
    >
    >Maybe it's being Texan, but I just hate it when people crap up barbecue
    >with weird sauces.


    They don't come out sweet at all Janet. People can eat them anyway
    they like, it's all a matter of choice. Actually my favorite way to
    do ribs is in the slow cooker with some Tony Romas rib sauce on them,
    you have to use a ladle to scoop them out because they are so tender,
    the bones and meat are separating.

  10. #10
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 18:16:37 -0600, Janet Wilder wrote:

    > Maybe it's being Texan, but I just hate it when people crap up barbecue
    > with weird sauces.


    I'm a mutt, it was just all that sugar. In his defense, he didn't
    consider it BBQ. It didn't matter, though.

    -sw

  11. #11
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 19:31:00 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Tue, 30 Nov 2010 18:16:37 -0600, Janet Wilder wrote:
    >
    >> Maybe it's being Texan, but I just hate it when people crap up barbecue
    >> with weird sauces.

    >
    >I'm a mutt, it was just all that sugar. In his defense, he didn't
    >consider it BBQ. It didn't matter, though.
    >
    >-sw



    That's correct, I didn't consider it BBQ only comfort food. Now if the
    thread had of been BBQ Ribs, that would of been a different matter
    altogether, I have a killer BBQ sauce.

  12. #12
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    On Nov 30, 1:30*pm, "Brian Christiansen"
    <brian_christi...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > I have some ribs in the freezer. *There are a plethora of recipes out there,
    > I have never cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.


    Make sure you boil the ribs first <ducking>

  13. #13
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Ribs

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    projectile vomit chick <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Nov 30, 1:30*pm, "Brian Christiansen"
    > <brian christi...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > > I have some ribs in the freezer. *There are a plethora of recipes out there,
    > > I have never cooked ribs, so I am just not sure.

    >
    > Make sure you boil the ribs first <ducking>


    <lol>!
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>
    *Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or
    no influence on society. -- Mark Twain

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