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Thread: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

  1. #1
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    Those of you with different designations for the fat content of dairy
    products, my apologies - I only know the American names for these
    things.

    We saw a recipe on television which we decided to try last night -
    printed out Alton Brown's Baked Stuffed Flounder, and it was
    _delicious_ - but with one problem in that both my wife and our oldest
    son found it too rich and had a little tummy ache afterwards. (I, OTOH,
    thought it was grand and felt full and happy afterwards and even weighed
    less this morning - a win/win if there ever was one.)

    We were wondering about using less dairy fat - the recipe calls for 1
    cup of heavy cream. We keep half-and-half in the house, and whole milk,
    too, so the obvious choices are to replace all the heavy cream with
    half-and-half, or to use half heavy cream and half whole milk which, I'm
    guessing, works out to at least approximately the same thing.

    What and how much thickener would we need to add to compensate for the
    reduced fat? My wife eats gluten-free so we'd use either corn starch or
    tapioca flour (or something else someone might suggest here) and not
    wheat flour.

    NB: The recipe also calls for 10 oz. of cheddar cheese and we aren't
    planning on changing that, although if a change is in order due to the
    reduced heavy cream, that's an option, too, e.g., perhaps using less
    half-and-half but a bit more cheese makes it work out OK - I don't know.

    Here's a link to the recipe:

    http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...lounder-recipe

    Many thanks in advance.

    -S-



  2. #2
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    Steve,

    John Cicarello (sp?) made a dish on the Food Channel this week and he used
    heavy cream instead of whipping cream for the higher butterfat content.

    That sounds like a middle-of-to-road option between half & half and heavy
    cream. Anyone??

    Best,

    Andy

  3. #3
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    Andy wrote:
    > Steve,
    >
    > John Cicarello (sp?) made a dish on the Food Channel this week and
    > he used heavy cream instead of whipping cream for the higher
    > butterfat content.
    >
    > That sounds like a middle-of-to-road option between half & half and
    > heavy cream. Anyone??
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy


    We whip heavy cream here to make whipped cream - not sure what the
    difference would be.

    -S-



  4. #4
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    Andy wrote:

    > John Cicarello (sp?) made a dish on the Food Channel this week and he used
    > heavy cream instead of whipping cream for the higher butterfat content.
    > That sounds like a middle-of-to-road option between half & half and heavy
    > cream. Anyone??


    This is staggeringly simple. Why the aversion to looking it up? I know
    you're online, so you why don't you just google it?

    Here's a hint: One half of half & half is cream. The other half is
    something else. See if you can connect the dots.



  5. #5
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    I have to say I dislike that recipe-cheese and fish and cream just do
    not go together imo. However I clicked on the link below that for
    Emeril's idea of stuffed flounder (recipe below) and thought it looked
    good.
    I buy from Sam's Club "Treasures of the Sea" frozen, lightly breaded,
    flounder fillets. They are very thin fillets, the breading/seasoning is
    perfect, and I can actually pop 3 of them into my toaster oven for
    20minutes for an ultra quick easy prep.

    I had never thought of letting them thaw then lining them with a filling
    and rolling them up but it sounds good. I am more likely to place a
    filling between two fillets in a stack presentation since I am not sure
    how well such thin fillets will roll up.

    I edited this (which is hard to do with a webtv lol) and my editing
    would probably not be to Emeril's liking but I hate their website it
    needs a good editor.

    Ingredients

    Four 6-8oz skinned deboned flounder fillets

    2 1/2 Tbsp butter plus 3 Tbsp butter

    1/2 pound crabmeat

    1/4 cup minced yellow onion

    2 Tbsp minced celery

    2 Tbsp minced bell pepper

    1 Tbsp minced parsley

    1 1/2 tsp minced garlic

    2 Tbsp mayonnaise

    1 egg, lightly beaten

    4 tsp lemon juice

    1 lemon, thinly sliced

    1/2 tsp Worcestershire

    3/4 tsp hot sauce

    3/4 cup crushed Ritz crackers

    creole seasoning (Emeril's Essence)
    salt
    black pepper

    Preheat oven 350 degrees F.

    Place crabmeat in large bowl and season with 1 tsp creole seasoning.
    Cover and refrigerate.

    In a medium skillet, melt 2 1/2 Tbsp butter over medium-high heat.

    Add onion, celery, and bell pepper and cook, stirring, until softened,
    about 4 minutes.

    Add parsley and garlic, and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Remove from
    heat and let cool.

    Add the cooled mixture to the crabmeat and toss gently to combine.

    Add the mayonnaise, beaten egg, lemon juice, Worcestershire, and hot
    sauce, and stir gently.

    Add 1/2 cup of the crushed Ritz, 1/4 tsp salt, 1/4 tsp pepper. Stir
    gently, being careful not to break up the crabmeat.

    Now, season each fish fillet with creole seasoning and salt and place on
    a work surface.

    Divide the crabmeat filling evenly among the centers of the fish fillets
    and roll the fillets up to encase the filling. Secure with toothpick, if
    necessary.

    Place the fillets, seam side down, in a buttered shallow baking dish and
    top with thin slices of lemon.

    Sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup of the cracker crumbs evenly over the
    tops of the fillets. Drizzle with 3 Tbsp of melted butter.

    Bake until lightly golden and cooked through, about 20 minutes. Garnish
    as desired with parsley and lemon wedges.


  6. #6
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    z z wrote:
    >
    > I buy from Sam's Club "Treasures of the Sea" frozen, lightly breaded,
    > flounder fillets. They are very thin fillets, the breading/seasoning is
    > perfect, and I can actually pop 3 of them into my toaster oven for
    > 20minutes for an ultra quick easy prep.


    20 minutes in toaster oven for cheap thin flounder fillets
    doesn't sound so "ultra quick easy prep" to me.

    "Just sayin' "

    G.

  7. #7
    z z Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    Why, Gary, I do believe you have a thing for me :-)


  8. #8
    Gary Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    z z wrote:
    >
    > Why, Gary, I do believe you have a thing for me :-)


    Heck.. if you really are angie (and not some guy), send pics of
    yourself.email me.

    You might look exactly like my 2nd wife.
    I've only been married once.

    G.

  9. #9
    Farm1 Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > We saw a recipe on television which we decided to try last night - printed
    > out Alton Brown's Baked Stuffed Flounder, and it was _delicious_ -
    > We were wondering about using less dairy fat - the recipe calls for 1 cup
    > of heavy cream. We keep half-and-half in the house, and whole milk, too,
    > so the obvious choices are to replace all the heavy cream with
    > half-and-half, or to use half heavy cream and half whole milk which, I'm
    > guessing, works out to at least approximately the same thing.


    I dont' reallys ee any need to use any cream in that recipe. I'd replace
    that 'cheese sauce' with a white sauce recipe to which I'd added some cheese
    and about a dessert spoon of brandy to save time, or, if I was really going
    to be fussy, I'd cook down the wine separately before making the bechamel
    sauce.

    I also doubt you need so much cheese and certainly not so much cream to get
    reasonable facsimile of what the chef was seeking so tat your family dont'
    end up with gut problems from such a rich recipe.

    I believe there are white sauce recipes for those who are gluten intolerant,
    so it might be worth looking for such a recipe online.

    Good luck.



  10. #10
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 09:44:49 -0400, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Those of you with different designations for the fat content of dairy
    >products, my apologies - I only know the American names for these
    >things.
    >
    >We saw a recipe on television which we decided to try last night -
    >printed out Alton Brown's Baked Stuffed Flounder, and it was
    >_delicious_ - but with one problem in that both my wife and our oldest
    >son found it too rich and had a little tummy ache afterwards. (I, OTOH,
    >thought it was grand and felt full and happy afterwards and even weighed
    >less this morning - a win/win if there ever was one.)
    >
    >We were wondering about using less dairy fat - the recipe calls for 1
    >cup of heavy cream.
    >
    >-S-
    >

    There is no problem. You already know the desired consistency of the
    sauce. Go ahead and use plain milk if you want. Make a corn starch
    slurry, get the milk hot and add the slurry until it is as thick as
    you want. Most cooks don't measure corn starch for cooking anyway.
    You are aware that the flavor and texture will change with the change
    in dairy product, but I see no problem.
    Janet US

  11. #11
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    Janet Bostwick wrote:
    > On Sat, 18 Aug 2012 09:44:49 -0400, "Steve Freides" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Those of you with different designations for the fat content of dairy
    >> products, my apologies - I only know the American names for these
    >> things.
    >>
    >> We saw a recipe on television which we decided to try last night -
    >> printed out Alton Brown's Baked Stuffed Flounder, and it was
    >> _delicious_ - but with one problem in that both my wife and our
    >> oldest son found it too rich and had a little tummy ache afterwards.
    >> (I, OTOH, thought it was grand and felt full and happy afterwards
    >> and even weighed less this morning - a win/win if there ever was
    >> one.)
    >>
    >> We were wondering about using less dairy fat - the recipe calls for 1
    >> cup of heavy cream.
    >>
    >> -S-
    >>

    > There is no problem. You already know the desired consistency of the
    > sauce. Go ahead and use plain milk if you want. Make a corn starch
    > slurry, get the milk hot and add the slurry until it is as thick as
    > you want. Most cooks don't measure corn starch for cooking anyway.
    > You are aware that the flavor and texture will change with the change
    > in dairy product, but I see no problem.
    > Janet US


    Thanks very much - that's what I was looking for. Neither of us here
    make sauces very often and the online reading seemed to talk about
    replacing the cream with part milk and part butter or using evaporated
    milk, neither of which is the way we think we want to go. We'll mix up
    some cornstarch and water and keep it on hand as we prepare the dish -
    we've decided to try it with half-and-half next time.

    -S-



  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 09:30:51 +1000, "Farm1" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >
    > > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html

    >
    > I dont' reallys see any need to use any cream in that recipe. I'd replace
    > that 'cheese sauce' with a white sauce recipe to which I'd added some cheese
    > and about a dessert spoon of brandy to save time, or, if I was really going
    > to be fussy, I'd cook down the wine separately before making the bechamel
    > sauce.
    >
    > I also doubt you need so much cheese and certainly not so much cream to get
    > reasonable facsimile of what the chef was seeking so tat your family dont'
    > end up with gut problems from such a rich recipe.
    >
    > I believe there are white sauce recipes for those who are gluten intolerant,
    > so it might be worth looking for such a recipe online.
    >
    > Good luck.
    >


    I find that if I want the same consistency, then I need to make a
    béchamel to use in place of heavy cream. Sometimes it matters,
    sometimes it doesn't. Since this recipe calls for wine, they're using
    heavy cream because it won't curdle like regular cream does when it
    comes into contact with wine - but the main thing they're doing with
    it is making a cheese sauce and skipping the steps of making béchamel
    first. I suppose there could be an argument against béchamel based on
    carb count or gluten intolerance, but I think they did it just for
    pure ease and shaving some time off the recipe.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  13. #13
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On 19/08/2012 2:34 PM, Steve Freides wrote:
    US
    >
    > Thanks very much - that's what I was looking for. Neither of us here
    > make sauces very often and the online reading seemed to talk about
    > replacing the cream with part milk and part butter or using evaporated
    > milk, neither of which is the way we think we want to go. We'll mix up
    > some cornstarch and water and keep it on hand as we prepare the dish -
    > we've decided to try it with half-and-half next time.
    >



    Personally, I would be looking at substituting a white sauce for the
    cream sauce.


  14. #14
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    I can't come up with specifics, but I know I have tried to avid heavy cream and the results were awful. So, once or twice a year, I bit the bullet and use the heavy cream and be done with it.

    I'm starting to feel the same way about fat free ricotta, sour cream etc. Some recipes need that fat.

    If you research this group, I think this subject has been 'beat' to death before. My mother had no truck with anything but heavy cream when she wanted whipped cream on something. As a kid, we fought over licking the beaters.

  15. #15
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 16:51:57 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 19/08/2012 2:34 PM, Steve Freides wrote:
    >US
    >>
    >> Thanks very much - that's what I was looking for. Neither of us here
    >> make sauces very often and the online reading seemed to talk about
    >> replacing the cream with part milk and part butter or using evaporated
    >> milk, neither of which is the way we think we want to go. We'll mix up
    >> some cornstarch and water and keep it on hand as we prepare the dish -
    >> we've decided to try it with half-and-half next time.
    >>

    >
    >
    >Personally, I would be looking at substituting a white sauce for the
    >cream sauce.


    How do you make a white sauce without using flour? He said his wife
    eats gluten free.
    Janet US

  16. #16
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 13:04:34 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 09:30:51 +1000, "Farm1" <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> "Steve Freides" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>
    >> > http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/a...ipe/index.html

    >>
    >> I dont' reallys see any need to use any cream in that recipe. I'd replace
    >> that 'cheese sauce' with a white sauce recipe to which I'd added some cheese
    >> and about a dessert spoon of brandy to save time, or, if I was really going
    >> to be fussy, I'd cook down the wine separately before making the bechamel
    >> sauce.
    >>
    >> I also doubt you need so much cheese and certainly not so much cream to get
    >> reasonable facsimile of what the chef was seeking so tat your family dont'
    >> end up with gut problems from such a rich recipe.
    >>
    >> I believe there are white sauce recipes for those who are gluten intolerant,
    >> so it might be worth looking for such a recipe online.
    >>
    >> Good luck.
    >>

    >
    >I find that if I want the same consistency, then I need to make a
    >béchamel to use in place of heavy cream. Sometimes it matters,
    >sometimes it doesn't. Since this recipe calls for wine, they're using
    >heavy cream because it won't curdle like regular cream does when it
    >comes into contact with wine - but the main thing they're doing with
    >it is making a cheese sauce and skipping the steps of making béchamel
    >first. I suppose there could be an argument against béchamel based on
    >carb count or gluten intolerance, but I think they did it just for
    >pure ease and shaving some time off the recipe.


    Is there a way to make a bechamel without using flour?
    Janet US

  17. #17
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On 19/08/2012 4:58 PM, Kalmia wrote:
    > I can't come up with specifics, but I know I have tried to avid heavy cream and the results were awful. So, once or twice a year, I bit the bullet and use the heavy cream and be done with it.
    >
    > I'm starting to feel the same way about fat free ricotta, sour cream etc. Some recipes need that fat.
    >
    > If you research this group, I think this subject has been 'beat' to death before. My mother had no truck with anything but heavy cream when she wanted whipped cream on something. As a kid, we fought over licking the beaters.
    >



    I am supposed to avoid fat now, though I never was a big fan of it. My
    mother used to make a lot of things with whipped cream. My brothers
    would fight over the beaters, but it never interested me.


  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 15:18:49 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 13:04:34 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >I find that if I want the same consistency, then I need to make a
    > >béchamel to use in place of heavy cream. Sometimes it matters,
    > >sometimes it doesn't. Since this recipe calls for wine, they're using
    > >heavy cream because it won't curdle like regular cream does when it
    > >comes into contact with wine - but the main thing they're doing with
    > >it is making a cheese sauce and skipping the steps of making béchamel
    > >first. I suppose there could be an argument against béchamel based on
    > >carb count or gluten intolerance, but I think they did it just for
    > >pure ease and shaving some time off the recipe.

    >
    > Is there a way to make a bechamel without using flour?


    I've never cared enough to find out - I was just talking about
    béchamel vs heavy cream.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 16:51:57 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 19/08/2012 2:34 PM, Steve Freides wrote:
    > US
    > >
    > > Thanks very much - that's what I was looking for. Neither of us here
    > > make sauces very often and the online reading seemed to talk about
    > > replacing the cream with part milk and part butter or using evaporated
    > > milk, neither of which is the way we think we want to go. We'll mix up
    > > some cornstarch and water and keep it on hand as we prepare the dish -
    > > we've decided to try it with half-and-half next time.
    > >

    >
    >
    > Personally, I would be looking at substituting a white sauce for the
    > cream sauce.


    I'd probably make a velouté using vegetable broth and take it from
    there.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Replacing Heavy Cream with Half and Half

    On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 15:17:06 -0600, Janet Bostwick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sun, 19 Aug 2012 16:51:57 -0400, Dave Smith
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >On 19/08/2012 2:34 PM, Steve Freides wrote:
    > >US
    > >>
    > >> Thanks very much - that's what I was looking for. Neither of us here
    > >> make sauces very often and the online reading seemed to talk about
    > >> replacing the cream with part milk and part butter or using evaporated
    > >> milk, neither of which is the way we think we want to go. We'll mix up
    > >> some cornstarch and water and keep it on hand as we prepare the dish -
    > >> we've decided to try it with half-and-half next time.
    > >>

    > >
    > >
    > >Personally, I would be looking at substituting a white sauce for the
    > >cream sauce.

    >
    > How do you make a white sauce without using flour? He said his wife
    > eats gluten free.


    He also said they substitute corn starch or tapioca flour for wheat
    flour and he's an experienced enough cook that he knows how to make a
    béchamel substitute with them.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

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