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Thread: reheating ribs

  1. #1
    Dimitri Guest

    Default reheating ribs

    My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)

    I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.

    What is the most successful way to reheat them?

    I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.

    Comments?

    TIA

    Dimitri

  2. #2
    aem Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    On Aug 31, 3:54 pm, Dimitri <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    > Comments?
    >

    That'll work, just don't overdo it. Food you're going to eat with
    your hands doesn't have to be really hot. -aem

  3. #3
    Lou Decruss Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 15:54:07 -0700 (PDT), Dimitri
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    >I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    >What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    >I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    >Comments?


    Microwave if they're already 100% done. I've had bad luck in the oven
    as they tend to dry out. If you're a sauce person you can nuk them
    till hot and then sauce them and broil for a few minutes. Either way
    they be almost as good as the first time. The only time I'll use the
    oven is if I've par smoked them. I'll pull of whatever I'm not going
    to eat that day and wrap and freeze. When I want them I put them in a
    glass cover casserole dish and bake at 225 for a few hours until done.
    Works like a charm.

    Lou

  4. #4
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Dimitri wrote:
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    > Comments?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Dimitri


    Dimitri -

    I would leave in the foil, and put them in my toaster oven till heated
    to where I wanted them at 350F.

    Bob

  5. #5
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs


    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.



    Yep... I'd add a teaspoon of water and make sure the packet is sealed real
    tight.

    George L


  6. #6
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Dimitri wrote:
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    > Comments?
    >
    > TIA


    Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  7. #7
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Dave Bugg wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >>
    >> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >>
    >> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >>
    >> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >>
    >> Comments?
    >>
    >> TIA

    >
    > Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    > them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    >


    You put foiled stuff in the microwave?

    I don't need to blow-up my kitchen.

    Bob

  8. #8
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs


    Bob Muncie wrote:
    >
    > Dave Bugg wrote:
    > > Dimitri wrote:
    > >> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    > >>
    > >> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    > >>
    > >> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    > >>
    > >> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    > >>
    > >> Comments?
    > >>
    > >> TIA

    > >
    > > Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    > > them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    > >

    >
    > You put foiled stuff in the microwave?


    Yes, contrary to urban legend, you can indeed put metal in a microwave
    oven and live to tell about it. You can not however wrap something in
    foil, put it in a microwave oven and expect it to actually heat as the
    foil shields the item from the microwaves. Foiling thin areas of a large
    item after they are adequately cooked, however is a valid way to keep
    from overcooking them.

  9. #9
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Pete C. wrote:
    > Bob Muncie wrote:
    >> Dave Bugg wrote:
    >>> Dimitri wrote:
    >>>> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >>>>
    >>>> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >>>>
    >>>> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >>>>
    >>>> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >>>>
    >>>> Comments?
    >>>>
    >>>> TIA
    >>> Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    >>> them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    >>>

    >> You put foiled stuff in the microwave?

    >
    > Yes, contrary to urban legend, you can indeed put metal in a microwave
    > oven and live to tell about it. You can not however wrap something in
    > foil, put it in a microwave oven and expect it to actually heat as the
    > foil shields the item from the microwaves. Foiling thin areas of a large
    > item after they are adequately cooked, however is a valid way to keep
    > from overcooking them.



    Thanks for your input Pete. I have also put chicken legs in the
    microwave with foil over the exposed bone. That's why I have an opinion
    that says "don't use foil in the microwave". I had to replace the
    microwave. I was however happy to not have to replace the kitchen.

    Bob

  10. #10
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    On Aug 31, 6:26*pm, Lou Decruss <LouDecr...@biteme.com> wrote:
    > On Mon, 31 Aug 2009 15:54:07 -0700 (PDT), Dimitri
    >
    > <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > >My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)

    >
    > >I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.

    >
    > >What is the most successful way to reheat them?

    >
    > >I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.

    >
    > >Comments?

    >
    > Microwave if they're already 100% done.


    Exactly right. Only microwave meat that is "already 100% done." Cut
    into 4 pieces and place along the sides of a square Corning Ware or
    Pyrex dish and put the lid on, then microwave.
    >
    > Lou


    --Bryan

  11. #11
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs


    Bob Muncie wrote:
    >
    > Pete C. wrote:
    > > Bob Muncie wrote:
    > >> Dave Bugg wrote:
    > >>> Dimitri wrote:
    > >>>> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    > >>>>
    > >>>> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    > >>>>
    > >>>> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    > >>>>
    > >>>> Comments?
    > >>>>
    > >>>> TIA
    > >>> Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    > >>> them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    > >>>
    > >> You put foiled stuff in the microwave?

    > >
    > > Yes, contrary to urban legend, you can indeed put metal in a microwave
    > > oven and live to tell about it. You can not however wrap something in
    > > foil, put it in a microwave oven and expect it to actually heat as the
    > > foil shields the item from the microwaves. Foiling thin areas of a large
    > > item after they are adequately cooked, however is a valid way to keep
    > > from overcooking them.

    >
    > Thanks for your input Pete. I have also put chicken legs in the
    > microwave with foil over the exposed bone. That's why I have an opinion
    > that says "don't use foil in the microwave". I had to replace the
    > microwave. I was however happy to not have to replace the kitchen.
    >
    > Bob


    Don't know why you had to replace the microwave. Microwave manufacturers
    give instructions on the use of foil in the microwave in the owners
    manuals. I routinely use metal in my microwave and have no issues. Some
    microwaves include metal shelves and metal temperature probes. It isn't
    magic, it's just science.

  12. #12
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Pete C. wrote:
    > Bob Muncie wrote:
    >> Pete C. wrote:
    >>> Bob Muncie wrote:
    >>>> Dave Bugg wrote:
    >>>>> Dimitri wrote:
    >>>>>> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Comments?
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> TIA
    >>>>> Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    >>>>> them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    >>>>>
    >>>> You put foiled stuff in the microwave?
    >>> Yes, contrary to urban legend, you can indeed put metal in a microwave
    >>> oven and live to tell about it. You can not however wrap something in
    >>> foil, put it in a microwave oven and expect it to actually heat as the
    >>> foil shields the item from the microwaves. Foiling thin areas of a large
    >>> item after they are adequately cooked, however is a valid way to keep
    >>> from overcooking them.

    >> Thanks for your input Pete. I have also put chicken legs in the
    >> microwave with foil over the exposed bone. That's why I have an opinion
    >> that says "don't use foil in the microwave". I had to replace the
    >> microwave. I was however happy to not have to replace the kitchen.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > Don't know why you had to replace the microwave. Microwave manufacturers
    > give instructions on the use of foil in the microwave in the owners
    > manuals. I routinely use metal in my microwave and have no issues. Some
    > microwaves include metal shelves and metal temperature probes. It isn't
    > magic, it's just science.



    And having my Microwave blow up?

    Is that an experiment in science?

    Not trying to make a point that you don't agree with, but can you
    gainsay my experience?

    Bob



  13. #13
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs


    Bob Muncie wrote:
    >
    > Pete C. wrote:
    > > Bob Muncie wrote:
    > >> Pete C. wrote:
    > >>> Bob Muncie wrote:
    > >>>> Dave Bugg wrote:
    > >>>>> Dimitri wrote:
    > >>>>>> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>> Comments?
    > >>>>>>
    > >>>>>> TIA
    > >>>>> Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    > >>>>> them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    > >>>>>
    > >>>> You put foiled stuff in the microwave?
    > >>> Yes, contrary to urban legend, you can indeed put metal in a microwave
    > >>> oven and live to tell about it. You can not however wrap something in
    > >>> foil, put it in a microwave oven and expect it to actually heat as the
    > >>> foil shields the item from the microwaves. Foiling thin areas of a large
    > >>> item after they are adequately cooked, however is a valid way to keep
    > >>> from overcooking them.
    > >> Thanks for your input Pete. I have also put chicken legs in the
    > >> microwave with foil over the exposed bone. That's why I have an opinion
    > >> that says "don't use foil in the microwave". I had to replace the
    > >> microwave. I was however happy to not have to replace the kitchen.
    > >>
    > >> Bob

    > >
    > > Don't know why you had to replace the microwave. Microwave manufacturers
    > > give instructions on the use of foil in the microwave in the owners
    > > manuals. I routinely use metal in my microwave and have no issues. Some
    > > microwaves include metal shelves and metal temperature probes. It isn't
    > > magic, it's just science.

    >
    > And having my Microwave blow up?
    >
    > Is that an experiment in science?
    >
    > Not trying to make a point that you don't agree with, but can you
    > gainsay my experience?
    >
    > Bob


    You haven't given any detail on exactly how you applied the foil, there
    are rules such as no points and not too close to the edges of the
    microwave. You also haven't indicated what constituted "blow up".

  14. #14
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Dimitri wrote:
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    > Comments?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Dimitri


    I find this is the best way to reheat any kind of Q:

    The Ziplock bags with the vacuum pump. Once you have pumped out all the
    air, the bags are can be used in a sous vide. It even says so on the
    bags. Just stick the sealed bags in a pot of boiling water.

    I have heated up left over ribs, brisket and pulled pork in these bags
    and they are always perfect, not losing any moisture at all.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  15. #15
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs


    "George Leppla" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >>
    >> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >>
    >> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >>
    >> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.

    >
    >
    > Yep... I'd add a teaspoon of water and make sure the packet is sealed real
    > tight.
    >
    > George L

    Bad enough braizing ribs in foil and you want to add more liquid....

    Every Chinese restaurant I've ever been to always serves reheated ribs,
    reheated under a broiler... how do you think they get it to the table in ten
    minute... every Chinese dish is leady in ten minute, eh oll ten minute, fly
    lice ten minute, yatka mein ten minute, lobster cantonese ten minute...
    always ten minute, not more, not less... phone a Chinese take out and order
    $500 worth of food, fifteen different dishes... ten minute! LOL



  16. #16
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    On Aug 31, 5:54*pm, Dimitri <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    > Comments?


    How long did you boil the ribs?

  17. #17
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs


    brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    > phone a Chinese take out and order
    > $500 worth of food, fifteen different dishes... ten minute! LOL


    Not far from the truth. I did pretty much that, ordering from my
    favorite hole-in-the-wall Chinese place for an office meeting instead of
    the usual pizza. About 20 different orders, including soups with the
    main selections, about a 15 minute drive from the office after calling
    in the order, and when I got there everything was ready in two big boxes
    that they carried out to the truck for me. Not a single mistake in the
    entire order either and everyone at the office loved it. The 1M BTU/Hr
    wok burners located in the middle of the sink trough with convenient
    rinse faucets has a lot to do with the phenomenal efficiency.

  18. #18
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    On Aug 31, 5:54*pm, Dimitri <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:
    > My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >
    > I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >
    > What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >
    > I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >
    > Comments?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Dimitri

    =========================================
    I'd eat 'em at room temperature. Or maybe right outta the fridge! I
    always order the next size bigger than I want to eat at the restaurant
    so I can eat all the sides (which I love) and take the rest of the
    ribs home for a snack. They seldom make it till morning!
    Lynn (no teeth) in Fargo
    Maybe you could just send me somebody's leftovers and I can do the
    bone-suckin' dawg thang (grin) . . .

  19. #19
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Pete C. wrote:
    > Bob Muncie wrote:
    >> Pete C. wrote:
    >>> Bob Muncie wrote:
    >>>> Pete C. wrote:
    >>>>> Bob Muncie wrote:
    >>>>>> Dave Bugg wrote:
    >>>>>>> Dimitri wrote:
    >>>>>>>> My eyes were bigger than my guests stomachs. :-)
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I have 2 racks left of smoked baby back ribs.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> What is the most successful way to reheat them?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> I was thinking about a sealed foil packet @ 180 degrees or so.
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> Comments?
    >>>>>>>>
    >>>>>>>> TIA
    >>>>>>> Use the Microwave. It gets them up to temperature quickly without drying
    >>>>>>> them out or making them taste all 'steamy' (if wrapped in foil)
    >>>>>>>
    >>>>>> You put foiled stuff in the microwave?
    >>>>> Yes, contrary to urban legend, you can indeed put metal in a microwave
    >>>>> oven and live to tell about it. You can not however wrap something in
    >>>>> foil, put it in a microwave oven and expect it to actually heat as the
    >>>>> foil shields the item from the microwaves. Foiling thin areas of a large
    >>>>> item after they are adequately cooked, however is a valid way to keep
    >>>>> from overcooking them.
    >>>> Thanks for your input Pete. I have also put chicken legs in the
    >>>> microwave with foil over the exposed bone. That's why I have an opinion
    >>>> that says "don't use foil in the microwave". I had to replace the
    >>>> microwave. I was however happy to not have to replace the kitchen.
    >>>>
    >>>> Bob
    >>> Don't know why you had to replace the microwave. Microwave manufacturers
    >>> give instructions on the use of foil in the microwave in the owners
    >>> manuals. I routinely use metal in my microwave and have no issues. Some
    >>> microwaves include metal shelves and metal temperature probes. It isn't
    >>> magic, it's just science.

    >> And having my Microwave blow up?
    >>
    >> Is that an experiment in science?
    >>
    >> Not trying to make a point that you don't agree with, but can you
    >> gainsay my experience?
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    > You haven't given any detail on exactly how you applied the foil, there
    > are rules such as no points and not too close to the edges of the
    > microwave. You also haven't indicated what constituted "blow up".


    How about having foiled the ends of chicken legs that have been fried so
    that they do not cook further?

    In any case, I could really not care what you have to say, as I have no
    intention of making the current microwave unusable.

    get that?

    Do I need to be more not nice?

    Bob


  20. #20
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: reheating ribs

    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:
    >
    > I'd eat 'em at room temperature. Or maybe right outta the fridge! I
    > always order the next size bigger than I want to eat at the restaurant
    > so I can eat all the sides (which I love) and take the rest of the
    > ribs home for a snack. They seldom make it till morning!


    If you're going to do that, you may as well
    consider cutting the meat off the bones,
    dicing it, and using it in fried rice or
    curried fried rice.

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