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Thread: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    There's a discussion on another message board as to whether any
    product made with dairy or eggs has to be kept refrigerated. Before
    you say yes, ask yourself do you refrigerate things like candies,
    cookies, cakes, or breads. Everyone else seems to think that if a
    homemade product contains dairy or eggs, no matter what it is, it has
    to be kept refrigerated. I seem to be the lone holdout who says it
    depends on what the item is. For example, I don't refrigerate pumpkin
    pie or pecan pie, even though they both contain eggs. I do, however,
    refrigerate savory items like soups, quiches, and casseroles whether
    they contain meat or not.

  2. #2
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    On Oct 31, 4:15*pm, "djs0...@aol.com" <djs0...@aol.com> wrote:
    > There's a discussion on another message board as to whether any
    > product made with dairy or eggs has to be kept refrigerated. *Before
    > you say yes, ask yourself do you refrigerate things like candies,
    > cookies, cakes, or breads. Everyone else seems to think that if a
    > homemade product contains dairy or eggs, no matter what it is, it has
    > to be kept refrigerated. *I seem to be the lone holdout who says it
    > depends on what the item is. *For example, I don't refrigerate pumpkin
    > pie or pecan pie, even though they both contain eggs. *I do, however,
    > refrigerate savory items like soups, quiches, and casseroles whether
    > they contain meat or not.

    ================================================== ====

    Actually, the amount of acid in a food helps keep it safe. That's why
    a vinegar coleslaw on a buffet is safer than a creamy one. One of the
    most dangerous things people do is to make "sun tea" by putting a jar
    of water with tea bags in it in a sunny place and leaving it there for
    hours. That just lets the temperature rise high enough to promote
    bacteria growth, not high enough to kill the bacteria. They really
    thrive in temperatures like full sun on a summer day.
    Lynn in Fargo
    at least that's what they taught in OSHA Food Safety classes

  3. #3
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    > Actually, the amount of acid in a food helps keep it safe. That's why
    > a vinegar coleslaw on a buffet is safer than a creamy one. One of the
    > most dangerous things people do is to make "sun tea" by putting a jar
    > of water with tea bags in it in a sunny place and leaving it there for
    > hours. That just lets the temperature rise high enough to promote
    > bacteria growth, not high enough to kill the bacteria. They really
    > thrive in temperatures like full sun on a summer day.
    > Lynn in Fargo
    > at least that's what they taught in OSHA Food Safety classes


    I think it is important in your suntea example to mention that tea
    leaves are natural elements grown in dirt. They also aren't processed in
    any fashion that is meant to kill or inhibit bacteria growth so the
    tepid water of sun tea allows any potentially pathogenic bacteria to
    thrive.

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    [email protected] wrote:
    > There's a discussion on another message board as to whether any
    > product made with dairy or eggs has to be kept refrigerated. Before
    > you say yes, ask yourself do you refrigerate things like candies,
    > cookies, cakes, or breads. Everyone else seems to think that if a
    > homemade product contains dairy or eggs, no matter what it is, it has
    > to be kept refrigerated. I seem to be the lone holdout who says it
    > depends on what the item is. For example, I don't refrigerate pumpkin
    > pie or pecan pie, even though they both contain eggs. I do, however,
    > refrigerate savory items like soups, quiches, and casseroles whether
    > they contain meat or not.


    I always refrigerate custard-type pies, including pumpkin and
    pecan types.

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    On Nov 1, 10:59�am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > djs0...@aol.com wrote:
    > > There's a discussion on another message board as to whether any
    > > product made with dairy or eggs has to be kept refrigerated. �Before
    > > you say yes, ask yourself do you refrigerate things like candies,
    > > cookies, cakes, or breads. Everyone else seems to think that if a
    > > homemade product contains dairy or eggs, no matter what it is, it has
    > > to be kept refrigerated. �I seem to be the lone holdout who says it
    > > depends on what the item is. �For example, I don't refrigerate pumpkin
    > > pie or pecan pie, even though they both contain eggs. �I do, however,
    > > refrigerate savory items like soups, quiches, and casseroles whether
    > > they contain meat or not.

    >
    > I always refrigerate custard-type pies, including pumpkin and
    > pecan types.



    In deciding whether to refrigerate each food item needs to be dealt
    with individually... I've never seen pumpkin or pecan pie refrigerated
    at retail stores, as are most all pies other than those heaped with
    whipped cream and ice cream pies. The only reason I refrigerate pies
    at home is because I much prefer pies cold (or hot) rather than at
    room temperature.

  6. #6
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 15:15:21 -0700, [email protected] wrote:

    > There's a discussion on another message board as to whether any product
    > made with dairy or eggs has to be kept refrigerated. Before you say
    > yes, ask yourself do you refrigerate things like candies, cookies,
    > cakes, or breads. Everyone else seems to think that if a homemade
    > product contains dairy or eggs, no matter what it is, it has to be kept
    > refrigerated. I seem to be the lone holdout who says it depends on what
    > the item is. For example, I don't refrigerate pumpkin pie or pecan pie,
    > even though they both contain eggs. I do, however, refrigerate savory
    > items like soups, quiches, and casseroles whether they contain meat or
    > not.


    My pots of stew (have one on the fire right now) often sit overnight
    unheated, this can go on for several days sometimes. Its never, ever gone
    'bad'. Same for the Kefir (fermented milk) I make... it never sees a
    refrigerator as a rule. And the butter... and the fresh meat hung in the
    shed...

  7. #7
    =?iso-8859-1?b?SmXfdXM=?= Guest

    Default Re: Refrigerating items with dairy or eggs

    On Fri, 31 Oct 2008 19:13:28 -0700, Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    > On Oct 31, 4:15*pm, "djs0...@aol.com" <djs0...@aol.com> wrote:
    >> There's a discussion on another message board as to whether any product
    >> made with dairy or eggs has to be kept refrigerated. *Before you say
    >> yes, ask yourself do you refrigerate things like candies, cookies,
    >> cakes, or breads. Everyone else seems to think that if a homemade
    >> product contains dairy or eggs, no matter what it is, it has to be kept
    >> refrigerated. *I seem to be the lone holdout who says it depends on
    >> what the item is. *For example, I don't refrigerate pumpkin pie or
    >> pecan pie, even though they both contain eggs. *I do, however,
    >> refrigerate savory items like soups, quiches, and casseroles whether
    >> they contain meat or not.

    > ================================================== ====
    >
    > Actually, the amount of acid in a food helps keep it safe. That's why a
    > vinegar coleslaw on a buffet is safer than a creamy one. One of the
    > most dangerous things people do is to make "sun tea" by putting a jar of
    > water with tea bags in it in a sunny place and leaving it there for
    > hours.


    Eww. That sounds really uninviting...

    > That just lets the temperature rise high enough to promote
    > bacteria growth, not high enough to kill the bacteria. They really
    > thrive in temperatures like full sun on a summer day. Lynn in Fargo
    > at least that's what they taught in OSHA Food Safety classes





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