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Thread: Reducing Espagnol

  1. #1
    Michael Horowitz Guest

    Default Reducing Espagnol

    Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.

    An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    seem finished, so I continued.

    I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    but don't know if I went too far.

    Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike


  2. #2
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    Michael Horowitz wrote:
    > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.
    >
    > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > seem finished, so I continued.
    >
    > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > but don't know if I went too far.
    >
    > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike
    >


    Given those instructions, I'd reduce by half, however long that took.
    That is, I'd reduce six cups of stock to three cups of sauce. But I
    think if it tastes good, you're good to go, and you can always thin it
    with stock/water/whatever.

    Serene

    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    Michael Horowitz wrote:
    > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.
    >
    > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > seem finished, so I continued.
    >
    > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > but don't know if I went too far.
    >
    > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike
    >



    If you have a large wok, they work extremely well for quickly
    reducing stock or juice or whatever, over full heat. (I know that's
    not what you asked, but this is Usenet ;-)

    Bob

  4. #4
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    Michael Horowitz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.
    >
    > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > seem finished, so I continued.
    >
    > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > but don't know if I went too far.
    >
    > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike


    What you describe does not sound like sauce espagnole at all. It
    appears to be something between demi-glace and glace, judging by the
    ratio of the reduction. How much reduction a demi-glace requires
    depends on its further use, particularly on how delicate or
    strong-tasting further ingredients are.

    Sauce espagnole is made with stock, brown roux and tomato paste. Making
    it involves multiple skimmings and strainings to get rid of the fat and
    impurities added by the roux. Jacques Pépin considers it outdated and
    suggests using starch like arrowroot instead of roux, resulting in an
    almost instant, clear sauce.

    Victor

  5. #5
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    Michael Horowitz wrote:
    > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.
    >
    > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > seem finished, so I continued.
    >
    > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > but don't know if I went too far.
    >
    > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike


    Only you know what went into the pot, you cooked it on your stove, so
    only you can decide... if you like the taste then that's all that
    matters.

  6. #6
    Joseph Littleshoes Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    Michael Horowitz wrote:
    > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.
    >
    > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > seem finished, so I continued.
    >
    > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > but don't know if I went too far.
    >
    > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike
    >


    According to Escoffier's "Guide Culinaire"

    "The time required for the preparation and refining of this sauce cannot
    be indicated exactly as it depends to a large extent on the quality of
    the stock used in its making.

    The refining of this sauce will be quicker if the stock is of very good
    quality in which case an excellent Espagnole can be prepared in five hours."


    He also encourages the spreading of the tomato puree on to a flat tray
    to be cooked in the oven until it turns a light brown color, "this will
    destroy most of the excess acidity found in tomato purees, and when
    prepared in this way, the puree assists in clarifying the sauce and at
    the same time gives it a smoother taste and a more agreeable color."

    If you have a copy of the Larusse Gastronomique available there is an
    interesting entry for Espagnole that describe the version recommended by
    Careme, and which Escoffier simplified.
    --
    JL

  7. #7
    Mike Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    On Apr 4, 5:56*pm, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > Michael Horowitz <mhoro...@cox.net> wrote:
    > > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.

    >
    > > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > > seem finished, so I continued.

    >
    > > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > > but don't know if I went too far.

    >
    > > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike

    >
    > What you describe does not sound like sauce espagnole at all. *It
    > appears to be something between demi-glace and glace, judging by the
    > ratio of the reduction. *How much reduction a demi-glace requires
    > depends on its further use, particularly on how delicate or
    > strong-tasting further ingredients are.
    >
    > Sauce espagnole is made with stock, brown roux and tomato paste. *Making
    > it involves multiple skimmings and strainings to get rid of the fat and
    > impurities added by the roux. *Jacques Pépin considers it outdated and
    > suggests using starch like arrowroot instead of roux, resulting in an
    > almost instant, clear sauce.
    >
    > Victor



    Victor-
    th
    you're suggesting simply thickening the veal stock?-Mike

  8. #8
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    "Michael Horowitz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Made two gallons of veal stock with a nice body and taste and then
    > went on to make Sauce Espagnol.
    > The instructions were to reduce by half or simmer for an hour.
    >
    > An hour passed and it wasn't reduced by half and the taste just didn't
    > seem finished, so I continued.
    >
    > I reduced six cups of stock to two cups of Sauce. I like the taste,
    > but don't know if I went too far.
    >
    > Any guideline for how much to reduce? - Mike


    1 Follow the recipe for volume not time
    2. Be sure the base is uncovered so steam can escape
    3. In my experience a low fire seems to reduce more quickly then a rapid
    boil ..
    4. Watch the bubbles the size and speed will indicate how close you are
    to burning. very small very rapid = ready to burn



    --
    Dimitri

    Chicken Loaf

    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.


  9. #9
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Reducing Espagnol

    Mike <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 4, 5:56*pm, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > >
    > > Sauce espagnole is made with stock, brown roux and tomato paste. *Making
    > > it involves multiple skimmings and strainings to get rid of the fat and
    > > impurities added by the roux. *Jacques Pépin considers it outdated and
    > > suggests using starch like arrowroot instead of roux, resulting in an
    > > almost instant, clear sauce.

    >
    > Victor-
    > th
    > you're suggesting simply thickening the veal stock?-Mike


    Basically, yes - once the stock has been reduced to meet your taste
    requirements, unless it already meets them with no further reduction.

    I'd better quote from the highly recommended _Complete Techniques_ by
    Jacques Pépin.

    <quote>
    On occasion a stock will reduce and intensify in flavor but will lack
    the gelatinous element to thicken to the right consistency. If you feel
    your sauce has reached the right taste but is too thin in texture,
    thicken it lightly with arrowroot. At one time a brown sauce used to be
    heavily thickened with flour. The classic sauce _Espagnole_, made with
    stock, brown _roux_ and tomato paste, though rarely made nowadays, is an
    example. Carème explains that the _roux_, the binding agent, separates
    after long, slow cooking, and the fat and the scum from the cooking of
    the _roux_ rise to the top and should be skimmed off. The sauce
    clarifies and purifies through the long cooking until only the "binding
    elements" of the flour (the glutinous part) remain to hold the sauce
    together. Although this sauce works with practice and care, it is more
    logical and faster to use a starch such as arrowroot - which is like a
    purified flour (binding element only) and has no taste, cooks instantly
    and doesn't "dirty" the sauce.
    </quote>

    Victor

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