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Thread: recommend a cooking book ?

  1. #1
    Tracy007 Guest

    Default recommend a cooking book ?


    Hi,everyone,

    because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    me,thank you


    regards

    Tracy




    --
    Tracy007

  2. #2
    JakartaDean Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    Tracy007 wrote:
    > Hi,everyone,
    >
    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > me,thank you
    >
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Tracy
    >

    I find I use Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything" more than any other
    book these days. Simple recipes explained well. To me, his recipes
    generally taste quite good.

    For anything fancier or different, epicurious.com

    Dean

  3. #3
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    foodbanter spy007 and she write:

    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,


    boring no good,no interesting,need interesting


    > so i decided to cook by myself from now on,but i need a valuable cooking
    > book,Who can recommend one to me,thank you


    niacin,thiamine,riboflavin,manda ruby she recommending invaluable protein
    idiot

    Bob


  4. #4
    heyjoe Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 03:31:08 -0400, Tracy007 wrote:

    > Hi,everyone,
    >
    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > me,thank you



    This is the quality of messages from Foodbanter!
    Take a trip to your local library and ask at the help desk where to find
    the section containing cookbooks.

    --
    Posting from groups.google.com or www.foodbanter.com or other web-forums
    dramatically reduces the chance of your post being read.
    Use the real usenet!
    Eternal-september is free, <http://www.eternal-september.org/>.

  5. #5
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?


    "Tracy007" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Hi,everyone,
    >
    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > me,thank you
    >
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Tracy
    >
    >

    By far the best book is the "Joy of Cooking". That's where everything
    begins.
    http://www.amazon.com/Joy-Cooking-75...8937787&sr=1-1

    Kent



  6. #6
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    Kent wrote:

    > By far the best book is the "Joy of Cooking". That's where everything
    > begins.


    it certainly was for me!

  7. #7
    EJ Willson Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    Tracy007 wrote:
    > Hi,everyone,
    >
    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > me,thank you
    >
    >
    > regards
    >
    > Tracy
    >
    >
    >
    >

    Any Cookbook by Alton Brown is a good book. Look at a few. I think
    you'll like at least one.

    EJ in NJ

  8. #8
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    Goomba wrote:
    > Kent wrote:
    >
    >> By far the best book is the "Joy of Cooking". That's where everything
    >> begins.

    >
    > it certainly was for me!


    That was what I would have suggested had the OP not been posting from
    foodbanter.com

  9. #9
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    Dave Smith wrote:
    > Goomba wrote:
    >> Kent wrote:
    >>
    >>> By far the best book is the "Joy of Cooking". That's where everything
    >>> begins.

    >>
    >> it certainly was for me!

    >
    > That was what I would have suggested had the OP not been posting from
    > foodbanter.com


    Oh, I didn't notice. <sigh>

  10. #10
    J. Clarke Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    On 3/18/2010 3:31 AM, Tracy007 wrote:
    > Hi,everyone,
    >
    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > me,thank you


    Go for a book that teaches methods, not recipes. If you know a few
    methods then you can throw food together from whatever comes to hand.
    When you get to the point that you've got basic techniques in your head
    then you can jam on them and do all sorts of things.

    Julia Child's "The Way To Cook" is one very good starting point--Martha
    Stewart claims that she learned to cook from reading Julia Child.

    Alton Brown's "I'm Just Here For The Food" is shorter and less pretty
    and covers somewhat different territory.

    "Martha Stewart's Cooking School" is good if you are totally lost but is
    of relatively limited range. What she covers she covers in great detail.

    If you like Chinese find a copy of "How to Cook and Eat In
    Chinese"--it's out of print so you'll have to go to Abebooks or other
    used book sources, it's the first good English-language Chinese cookbook
    and is still one of the best for learning technique.

    "The Best Recipe" is based on careful tests conducted by Cooks
    Illustrated Magazine, and it's very good for recipes besides explaining
    the testing that went into them.

    One big thick book that is very worthwhile is "On Food and Cooking" by
    Harold McGee. It's not a recipe book or a howto book, it's a "why it
    works" book, and it's amazing how much knowing why you are doing what
    you are doing helps.

    You should also have one of the standards--Joy of Cooking, Good
    Housekeeping, etc, which are more recipe oriented than method
    oriented--they're good idea books, but they won't really teach you how
    like one of the technique-oriented books will.

    Watch the Food Network--seeing Giada De Laurentiis and Alton Brown and
    other professionally trained cooks at work will teach you in ways that
    reading a book can't.







  11. #11
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    I think I'm with this JClarke. I love the McGee, but it is not really
    for the first timer. High school science reference that I am glad to
    have. Joy of and Julia, not brilliant but better than going to Taco
    Bell. You want a recipe, they got em. And epicuriious. And if you
    want to cook you should have the books. If you want to chop your own
    onions you can learn some good stuff from TV. Or come here. We got
    different ideas, but I think we can all help you stay out out of the
    drive-thru.



  12. #12
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?


    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 3/18/2010 3:31 AM, Tracy007 wrote:
    >> Hi,everyone,
    >>
    >> because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    >> now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    >> me,thank you

    >
    > Go for a book that teaches methods, not recipes. If you know a few
    > methods then you can throw food together from whatever comes to hand. When
    > you get to the point that you've got basic techniques in your head then
    > you can jam on them and do all sorts of things.
    >
    > Julia Child's "The Way To Cook" is one very good starting point--Martha
    > Stewart claims that she learned to cook from reading Julia Child.
    >
    > Alton Brown's "I'm Just Here For The Food" is shorter and less pretty and
    > covers somewhat different territory.
    >
    > "Martha Stewart's Cooking School" is good if you are totally lost but is
    > of relatively limited range. What she covers she covers in great detail.
    >
    > If you like Chinese find a copy of "How to Cook and Eat In Chinese"--it's
    > out of print so you'll have to go to Abebooks or other used book sources,
    > it's the first good English-language Chinese cookbook and is still one of
    > the best for learning technique.
    >
    > "The Best Recipe" is based on careful tests conducted by Cooks Illustrated
    > Magazine, and it's very good for recipes besides explaining the testing
    > that went into them.
    >
    > One big thick book that is very worthwhile is "On Food and Cooking" by
    > Harold McGee. It's not a recipe book or a howto book, it's a "why it
    > works" book, and it's amazing how much knowing why you are doing what you
    > are doing helps.
    >
    > You should also have one of the standards--Joy of Cooking, Good
    > Housekeeping, etc, which are more recipe oriented than method
    > oriented--they're good idea books, but they won't really teach you how
    > like one of the technique-oriented books will.
    >
    > Watch the Food Network--seeing Giada De Laurentiis and Alton Brown and
    > other professionally trained cooks at work will teach you in ways that
    > reading a book can't.
    >
    >

    After I start with the "Joy of Cooking", Julia Child's "The Way to Cook"
    gets picked up second when looking for a recipe. It's an incredible book.





  13. #13
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?


    "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I think I'm with this JClarke. I love the McGee, but it is not really
    > for the first timer. High school science reference that I am glad to
    > have. Joy of and Julia, not brilliant but better than going to Taco
    > Bell.


    "Joy of Cooking" and "Julia Child" not brilliant??? Come on!!!

    You want a recipe, they got em. And epicuriious. And if you
    > want to cook you should have the books. If you want to chop your own
    > onions you can learn some good stuff from TV. Or come here. We got
    > different ideas, but I think we can all help you stay out out of the
    > drive-thru.
    >
    >




  14. #14
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 18:24:08 -0700, Kent wrote:

    > "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >>I think I'm with this JClarke. I love the McGee, but it is not really
    >> for the first timer. High school science reference that I am glad to
    >> have. Joy of and Julia, not brilliant but better than going to Taco
    >> Bell.

    >
    > "Joy of Cooking" and "Julia Child" not brilliant??? Come on!!!


    i think the brilliance of 'joy of cooking' is in the tone. very friendly,
    very reassuring, sometimes quite funny. (i'm sure julia is similar, but
    i'm not familiar with her books.)

    your pal,
    blake

  15. #15
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    On Mar 19, 10:53 am, blake murphy <blakepmNOTT...@verizon.net> wrote:
    > On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 18:24:08 -0700, Kent wrote:
    > > "bulka" <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]...
    > >>I think I'm with this JClarke. I love the McGee, but it is not really
    > >> for the first timer. High school science reference that I am glad to
    > >> have. Joy of and Julia, not brilliant but better than going to Taco
    > >> Bell.

    >
    > > "Joy of Cooking" and "Julia Child" not brilliant??? Come on!!!

    >
    > i think the brilliance of 'joy of cooking' is in the tone. very friendly,
    > very reassuring, sometimes quite funny. (i'm sure julia is similar, but
    > i'm not familiar with her books.)
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake


    Something like that. When I was starting, Joy was usually my first
    place to look for anything. Now that I mostly use recipies as
    suggetions, I hit epicurious or you rfc folk. Still like having Joy
    somewhere on the shelf.

    B

  16. #16
    aem Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    On Mar 17, 11:31 pm, Tracy007 <Tracy007.5e7a148.205...@foodbanter.com>
    wrote:
    > Hi,everyone,
    >
    > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > me,thank you
    >

    This link is to a review of Jacques Pepin's Complete Techniques at
    Powell's bookstore. They have one copy, but I'm sure you can also
    find it elsewhere. While I also recommend Julia Child's The Way To
    Cook, this Pepin work is extensive in its coverage and thoroughly
    dependable. If you worked all the way through it you'd know a lot
    about cooking, not only a lot of classic recipes but the techniques
    that make them feasible. -aem
    http://www.powells.com/biblio/2-9781579121655-4

  17. #17
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?


    "blake murphy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 18 Mar 2010 18:24:08 -0700, Kent wrote:
    >
    >> "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:5d7[email protected]..
    >>>I think I'm with this JClarke. I love the McGee, but it is not really
    >>> for the first timer. High school science reference that I am glad to
    >>> have. Joy of and Julia, not brilliant but better than going to Taco
    >>> Bell.

    >>
    >> "Joy of Cooking" and "Julia Child" not brilliant??? Come on!!!

    >
    > i think the brilliance of 'joy of cooking' is in the tone. very friendly,
    > very reassuring, sometimes quite funny. (i'm sure julia is similar, but
    > i'm not familiar with her books.)
    >
    > your pal,
    > blake
    >
    >

    What blows me away ongoing about the "Joy...." is that every recipe in that
    book is a good solid working recipe. There just aren't any errors. Their
    suscinct dialogue about food preparation is always right on. For me it's
    sort of my "old testament". When I stare at the several hundred cookbooks in
    front of me I first reach for "Joy...", then "The Way to....[Julia]. and
    then "Essentials of Classic Italian....[Marcella Hazan].

    As I'm sure you know, cookbooks are a high buck part of the nonfiction
    publishing business. A lot of cookbooks are written by people who author
    more than they "chef". If you look at the output of some writers, there will
    be ten books with a total of 2-3000 recipes about foods of different
    nationalities. I'm told that many times they probably have been tried once
    or twice. The great writers above refined their recipes ongoing over their
    careers. The same recipe would be republished, in refined, improved fashion
    as seen now.

    RE: Julia: The PBS series "The French Chef" with Julia is on DVD and
    probably available at your local lilbrary. Get the book[also from your
    library, as almost all have it] and follow along. It'll blow you away. In
    addition to her genius, her humor is incredible!

    Kent




  18. #18
    Cindy Fuller Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "J. Clarke" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 3/18/2010 3:31 AM, Tracy007 wrote:
    > > Hi,everyone,
    > >
    > > because i'm boring with the fastfood,so i decided to cook by myself from
    > > now on,but i need a valuable cooking book,Who can recommend one to
    > > me,thank you

    >
    > Go for a book that teaches methods, not recipes. If you know a few
    > methods then you can throw food together from whatever comes to hand.
    > When you get to the point that you've got basic techniques in your head
    > then you can jam on them and do all sorts of things.
    >
    > Julia Child's "The Way To Cook" is one very good starting point--Martha
    > Stewart claims that she learned to cook from reading Julia Child.
    >
    > Alton Brown's "I'm Just Here For The Food" is shorter and less pretty
    > and covers somewhat different territory.
    >

    Alton's is a very readable book. He explains food chemistry in
    real-folks language. (I used his explanation of saturated vs.
    nonsaturated fatty acids in my intro nutrition class.) "Cookwise", by
    Shirley O. Corriher, is another geek-oriented book.

    > If you like Chinese find a copy of "How to Cook and Eat In
    > Chinese"--it's out of print so you'll have to go to Abebooks or other
    > used book sources, it's the first good English-language Chinese cookbook
    > and is still one of the best for learning technique.


    Another good Chinese methods cookbook is "The Key to Chinese Cooking",
    by Irene Kuo. It also may be out of print.
    >

    snip
    >
    > You should also have one of the standards--Joy of Cooking, Good
    > Housekeeping, etc, which are more recipe oriented than method
    > oriented--they're good idea books, but they won't really teach you how
    > like one of the technique-oriented books will.


    I learned to cook from my mother's 1950-edition Betty Crocker cookbook.
    When I was in college, I got my first "Joy of Cooking". Sometimes you
    need the basic books, and then you can branch into Julia, Jacques, et
    al.
    >
    > Watch the Food Network--seeing Giada De Laurentiis and Alton Brown and
    > other professionally trained cooks at work will teach you in ways that
    > reading a book can't.


    I've gone cold on the Food Network of late. They've gone more to the
    competition shows, which have entertainment value but minimal learning
    opportunities. You'd be better off watching some of the cooking shows
    on PBS, such as "America's Test Kitchen."

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me

  19. #19
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2010 15:10:46 -0700, Cindy Fuller
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've gone cold on the Food Network of late. They've gone more to the
    >competition shows, which have entertainment value but minimal learning
    >opportunities. You'd be better off watching some of the cooking shows
    >on PBS, such as "America's Test Kitchen."
    >
    >Cindy


    I just heard in the last few days, that the food network is spinning
    off another channel: The Cooking channel. I think enough people were
    protesting, so they felt they had to do something.

    And as far as beginning cookbooks go, one I really like is Learning to
    Cook with Marion Cunningham. She was an associate of James Beard, and
    she discovered that teaching adults to cook was very challenging. Her
    book is very good at some basic things. The recipes are very good as
    well.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  20. #20
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: recommend a cooking book ?

    I'm a real fan of Mark Bittman's, particularly "How to Cook Anything."

    -- Larry

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