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Thread: Recommend a cook book?

  1. #1
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Recommend a cook book?

    Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving daughters,
    daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    Wrong.
    Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with little
    skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time? What
    has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly


  2. #2
    George M. Middius Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    Polly Esther wrote:

    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving daughters,
    > daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    > we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    > (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    > that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with little
    > skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time? What
    > has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly



    Here it is:

    The James Beard Cookbook
    (Dell Publishing Co., 1959. Revised in 1961, 1970, 1987 (paperback),
    and 1996.)
    Beard intended The James Beard Cookbook to have mass-market appeal to
    “those who are just beginning to cook and say they don’t even know how
    to boil water; and second, those who have been trying to cook for a
    while and wonder why their meals don’t taste like mother’s cooking or
    the food in good restaurants.” It was the first trade paperback
    cookbook (meaning it began life as a paperback) ever published in the
    United States. Craig Claiborne’s New York Times review of the book
    described its author as a “kitchen wizard.” Given the good press,
    helpful content, and the price tag—75 cents—it’s no surprise it became
    a classic. Today, you’ll need to shell out a bit more, but no one
    seems to mind. The cookbook, according to Beard’s longtime friend and
    editor, John Ferrone, has been Beard’s bestseller.


    <http://www.jamesbeard.org/about/james-beard-books>

    (The price may have gone up since 1959, but still...)



  3. #3
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 22:36:52 -0500, "Polly Esther"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving daughters,
    > daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    > we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    > (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    > that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with little
    > skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time? What
    > has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly


    There used to be a series of visual cookbooks with lots of pictures
    illustrating the steps in the recipe; that were based on various
    themes, like chicken, pasta or vegetables. I'm not finding them, so
    they must be long out of print.... but I see that Rachel Ray has a
    Look and Cook cookbook now.
    http://www.amazon.com/Rachael-Rays-L.../dp/030759050X

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?


    "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    > daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    > we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    > (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    > that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with
    > little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time?
    > What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly


    I rarely use cookbooks any more because so much is available online. But
    Betty Crocker does still make cookbooks and their general one is most likely
    the way to go. I was given a Joy of Cooking book about 14 years ago and as
    large as it is, I only ever made one thing out of it. Technically it is a
    good book. It just wasn't appealing to me. I like books with pictures in
    them.



  5. #5
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?


    "Polly Esther" wrote in message news:[email protected]..

    Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving daughters,
    daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    Wrong.
    Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with little
    skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time? What
    has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly



    IMHO nothing replaces the Betty Crocker cookbook Do the grandsons have
    kitchens? Or are they stuck in a dormitory with a hot plate and a
    microwave?! The Good Housekeeping Cookbook circa 1978 is a good one.
    Everyone talks about the Joy of Cooking but I've never owned a copy so I
    can't comment.

    Jill


  6. #6
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 9/10/2012 1:45 AM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    > "Polly Esther" wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving daughters,
    > daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    > we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    > (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    > that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with
    > little
    > skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time? What
    > has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly
    >
    >
    >
    > IMHO nothing replaces the Betty Crocker cookbook Do the grandsons
    > have kitchens? Or are they stuck in a dormitory with a hot plate and a
    > microwave?! The Good Housekeeping Cookbook circa 1978 is a good one.
    > Everyone talks about the Joy of Cooking but I've never owned a copy so I
    > can't comment.
    >


    As one who began to do all his own cooking 15 years ago, my main
    "cookbook" is a computer file called Recipes/Tested but I still use my
    wife's "Joy of Cooking" for basics.

    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  7. #7
    news Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?


    "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    What
    > has replaced Betty Crocker 1958?


    The internet. I have a huge collection of cookbooks but haven't cracked one
    in years. Everything you could possible want is online.



  8. #8
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    Polly Esther <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    > daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking
    > tools. Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind
    > that we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic
    > beginner (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but
    > not One that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry
    > guys with little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and
    > heaps of time? What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly


    Joy of Cooking. It has plenty of easy recipes as well as essential core
    information about ingredients, techniques, and nutrition, all well
    explained. To whatever extent they want to learn and improve their basic
    skills, Joy will serve them well, and if confronted with a mystery
    ingredient, they can look it up and figure out what to do.

    MartyB



  9. #9
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 9/9/12 11:36 PM, Polly Esther wrote:

    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not
    > One that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys
    > with little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps
    > of time? What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly


    We have two full bookcases of cookbooks as well. But if I had to choose
    or recommend one book, it would be Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything."

    -- Larry


  10. #10
    mwall Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    Polly Esther carefully entered the following data on 09/09/2012 10:36 PM:
    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    > daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind
    > that we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic
    > beginner (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not
    > One that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys
    > with little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps
    > of time? What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly



    The "Betty Crocker Cookbook" for the basics- cooking potatoes, boiling
    eggs, etc. Photos, times, etc..

    Mark Bittman's "How to Cook Everything"- shopping info for main
    ingredients, multiple variations per recipe to help tweak it to your
    tastes; or just to prevent boredom.
    * The Vegetarian version is a nice companion for vegetable shoppers. I
    used this one for unfamiliar veggies. Also, sometimes it's not the
    veggie, but the cooking method or variety of the veggie which is not
    pleasing to us .

    "Joy of Cooking"- this is my last resort before the Internet for a range
    of recipes, modern and less so. ex: salad dressings/marinades for
    grilling, or frozen desserts.

    If the young men are visual learners, youtube or video blogs can be
    great for getting them started.

    For trendy or newer styles/flavors, I use blogs around the net for
    sources. Plenty of photos progressing from raw ingredients to finished
    dish and the responses to the recipe add tweaks, corrections or more
    ideas in one place are appreciated conveniences.

    Good for you helping the young men learn to cook! I know of several
    families struggling when Dad couldn't cook and only one of the children
    was able to cook when Mom became sick or incapacitated for a time.
    Cooking skills can also impress dates. Learn a dish for each meal,
    nothing fancy, and a dessert. Then, expand your skills from there.

    Gadgets? A good knife and decent-sized cutting board.
    The stick blender, a.k.a. Emeril's "boat motor", caught my husband's
    eye, as did the manual cookie press and hand mixer.

  11. #11
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 09/09/2012 11:36 PM, Polly Esther wrote:
    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    > daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind
    > that we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic
    > beginner (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not
    > One that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys
    > with little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps
    > of time? What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly




    When I was young and just learning how to cook, I used the Better Homes
    and Gardens cookbook. It wasn't long before I switched to the Joy of
    Cooking which became a favourite. We gave one to my (then) bachelor
    brother and he loved it and more than 30 years later is still talking
    about how much help it has been to him.


  12. #12
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 2012-09-10, news <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The internet. I have a huge collection of cookbooks but haven't cracked one
    > in years. Everything you could possible want is online.


    Agreed. If they have a working net connection and a computer, it's a
    non-issue. Worst case scenario, go to the library. Videojug is great
    for braindead simple cooking howto/recipes. If you can't find it
    there, try Youtube. If that doesn't help you, then nothing can and
    you better find a Taco Bell or Chinese delivery or yer gonna die!

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On Mon, 10 Sep 2012 09:01:30 -0400, "news" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > What
    > > has replaced Betty Crocker 1958?

    >
    > The internet. I have a huge collection of cookbooks but haven't cracked one
    > in years. Everything you could possible want is online.
    >

    I'll ditto that and don't forget YouTube has more tutorials than you
    can possibly imagine. The world of online recipes is a wonderful
    thing... and if you're looking for a specific recipe by a specific big
    name cookbook author - chances are that some internet food blogger has
    done it.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  14. #14
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 2012-09-10, mwall <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The "Betty Crocker Cookbook" for the basics- cooking potatoes, boiling
    > eggs, etc. Photos, times, etc..


    Yep!

    OTOH, if they are exceptionally stupid, Betty Crocker: Kids Cook
    should stand them in good stead.

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  15. #15
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 2012-09-10, Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Cooking which became a favourite. We gave one to my (then) bachelor
    > brother and he loved it and more than 30 years later is still talking
    > about how much help it has been to him.


    Yes Dave, but that was back in the day when folks could actually read.
    In today's cyberspace era, if it's not an video game or txtng code or
    at least an 800x600 jpeg image, it's pretty much useless.

    Hey, there's an idea! Grand Theft Auto: Le Cordon Bleu!

    "Be the first to run down that juicy Spring lamb in yer blown 460 CID
    Lincoln Mk IV pimpmobile and then, using sanitized butcher's twine, truss
    up the ribs...."

    nb

    --
    Definition of objectivism:
    "Eff you! I got mine."
    http://www.nongmoproject.org/

  16. #16
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k2kqh0$9ov$[email protected]..
    > Polly Esther <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    >> daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking
    >> tools. Wrong.
    >> Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind
    >> that we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic
    >> beginner (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    >> There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but
    >> not One that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry
    >> guys with little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and
    >> heaps of time? What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly

    >
    > Joy of Cooking. It has plenty of easy recipes as well as essential core
    > information about ingredients, techniques, and nutrition, all well
    > explained. To whatever extent they want to learn and improve their basic
    > skills, Joy will serve them well, and if confronted with a mystery
    > ingredient, they can look it up and figure out what to do.


    I agree on Joy of Cooking. The book is well-honed, well-tested and
    very detailed, particularly in the area of explaining new things and
    techniques. As to the mystery ingredients, it is second to none
    that I have come across. After so many years I still use it, and
    would recommend it strongly for the new cook.

    pavane



  17. #17
    pltrgyst Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On 9/10/12 12:39 PM, pavane wrote:>
    > I agree on Joy of Cooking. The book is well-honed, well-tested and
    > very detailed, particularly in the area of explaining new things and
    > techniques.... After so many years I still use it, and
    > would recommend it strongly for the new cook.


    You realize that Joy of Cooking has not only been updated, but has been
    completely re-written at least once?

    Are you recommending the most recent version, or an older edition?

    There are major differences.

    -- Larry


  18. #18
    Cindy Fuller Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    In article <k2kobs$d4e$[email protected]>, "news" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > What
    > > has replaced Betty Crocker 1958?

    >
    > The internet. I have a huge collection of cookbooks but haven't cracked one
    > in years. Everything you could possible want is online.


    I would not recommend the internet as a source of knowledge for a
    beginning cook who cannot discern what's right or wrong in a recipe.
    Some of the recipes we've downloaded from even "legit" sites have been
    pretty bad in terms of methodology.

    In addition to Joy, Better Homes & Gardens, and How to Cook Everything,
    I would advocate Shirley Corriher's Cookwise or Alton Brown's first
    book. Both Shirley and Alton make food science accessible.

    Cindy

    --
    C.J. Fuller

    Delete the obvious to email me

  19. #19
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    On Sun, 9 Sep 2012 21:28:35 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Polly Esther" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    >> daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking tools.
    >> Wrong.
    >> Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind that
    >> we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic beginner
    >> (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    >> There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not One
    >> that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys with
    >> little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps of time?
    >> What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly

    >
    >I rarely use cookbooks any more because so much is available online. But
    >Betty Crocker does still make cookbooks and their general one is most likely
    >the way to go. I was given a Joy of Cooking book about 14 years ago and as
    >large as it is, I only ever made one thing out of it. Technically it is a
    >good book. It just wasn't appealing to me.
    >I like books with pictures in them.


    That's why the porn sites are so popular. LOL

  20. #20
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Recommend a cook book?

    Polly Esther wrote:
    > Well. Who would have thought? All these years I've been giving
    > daughters, daughters-in-law and granddaughters helpful good cooking
    > tools.
    > Wrong.
    > Maybe not wrong but woefully inadequate. It never crossed my mind
    > that we would have not one but two grandsons who need a very basic
    > beginner (assume they don't know anything) cook book.
    > There are maybe hundreds of cookbooks here in my collection but not
    > One that will fill the bill. Is there a new cookbook for hungry guys
    > with little skill that doesn't expect fancy rare ingredients and heaps
    > of time? What has replaced Betty Crocker 1958? Help me. Polly



    _Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook_ with the plaid cover.

    Bob

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