Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 70

Thread: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

  1. #1
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    I already know how some people feel about this meat product but for
    others, here is something I cooked up tonight to use up some sour cream
    and some egg noodles.

    It's cooling now but it smells wonderful. I made it exactly as written
    but cut it down just a little.

    http://www.hillshirefarm.com/recipes...casserole.aspx

  2. #2
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On 12/16/2011 10:30 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > I already know how some people feel about this meat product but for
    > others, here is something I cooked up tonight to use up some sour cream
    > and some egg noodles.
    >
    > It's cooling now but it smells wonderful. I made it exactly as written
    > but cut it down just a little.
    >
    > http://www.hillshirefarm.com/recipes...casserole.aspx


    The only thing I'd change about the recipe is to sweat the chopped onion
    before using it in the hotdish. The onion was still a little raw but
    otherwise, it was very good. Plenty of leftovers for lunches or dinners.


  3. #3
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On 12/16/2011 8:30 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    > I already know how some people feel about this meat product but for
    > others, here is something I cooked up tonight to use up some sour cream
    > and some egg noodles.
    >
    > It's cooling now but it smells wonderful. I made it exactly as written
    > but cut it down just a little.
    >
    > http://www.hillshirefarm.com/recipes...casserole.aspx



    I like this sausage, but these days I have to choose the low-fat version
    of it. It's just as good as the regular, and a lot easier to live with
    later on.

  4. #4
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 22:07:53 -0700, Pennyaline
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 12/16/2011 8:30 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    >> I already know how some people feel about this meat product but for
    >> others, here is something I cooked up tonight to use up some sour cream
    >> and some egg noodles.
    >>
    >> It's cooling now but it smells wonderful. I made it exactly as written
    >> but cut it down just a little.
    >>
    >> http://www.hillshirefarm.com/recipes...casserole.aspx

    >
    >
    >I like this sausage, but these days I have to choose the low-fat version
    >of it. It's just as good as the regular, and a lot easier to live with
    >later on.



    Look around for a good Polish grocery or deli. The stuff most have is
    half the fat of Hillshire and has better flavor.

    The place I go to has a few versions: extra lean, extra garlic, and
    fresh.

  5. #5
    Pennyaline Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On 12/17/2011 7:18 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

    > Look around for a good Polish grocery or deli. The stuff most have is
    > half the fat of Hillshire and has better flavor.
    >
    > The place I go to has a few versions: extra lean, extra garlic, and
    > fresh.



    Oh, I wish. When I lived in Western New York, finding good Polish
    sausage was a no-brainer. It was everywhere. Here in the Salt Lake City
    region, however, things are different. The choices are Hillshire Farms,
    Johnsonville (okay, but only okay) and store brand. Meh. It's rare to
    find a deli with something decent, and meat markets are rarer.

  6. #6
    George Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On 12/17/2011 9:42 AM, Pennyaline wrote:
    > On 12/17/2011 7:18 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >
    >> Look around for a good Polish grocery or deli. The stuff most have is
    >> half the fat of Hillshire and has better flavor.
    >>
    >> The place I go to has a few versions: extra lean, extra garlic, and
    >> fresh.

    >
    >
    > Oh, I wish. When I lived in Western New York, finding good Polish
    > sausage was a no-brainer. It was everywhere. Here in the Salt Lake City
    > region, however, things are different. The choices are Hillshire Farms,
    > Johnsonville (okay, but only okay) and store brand. Meh. It's rare to
    > find a deli with something decent, and meat markets are rarer.


    A number will ship. A local place morphed from a meat market into a
    kielbasa only shop. The smoked is smoked with real fruit wood on their
    premises. They make tons of it and you actually have to order in advance
    around the holidays.

    If I had a choice of the hillsure kielbasa like product or none I would
    go with none. I just can't get past the taste of it.

  7. #7
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 22:07:53 -0700, Pennyaline
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 12/16/2011 8:30 PM, Cheryl wrote:
    >> I already know how some people feel about this meat product but for
    >> others, here is something I cooked up tonight to use up some sour cream
    >> and some egg noodles.
    >>
    >> It's cooling now but it smells wonderful. I made it exactly as written
    >> but cut it down just a little.
    >>
    >> http://www.hillshirefarm.com/recipes...casserole.aspx

    >
    >
    >I like this sausage, but these days I have to choose the low-fat version
    >of it. It's just as good as the regular, and a lot easier to live with
    >later on.


    If you first simmer the sausage for 30 minutes and toss the water you
    get rid of substantial fat but more importantly you get rid of at
    least half the curing salts. And rather than lose flavor simmering
    improves flavor by causing the flavors of the spices to permeate the
    meat. I think their low fat version is awful, it's made with turkey,
    blech. For that recipe after simmering I'd suggest browning the
    sausage coins before proceeding, adds more flavor (add onions to saute
    some). However I can't see sour cream with kielbasa: TIAD. I think
    that recipe would be better if you swap the sour cream for a basic
    white sauce... then serve over the cooked noodles (or, rice, biscuits,
    toast, etc.) rather than make the caserole. Could even add other
    types of sausage coins (make an assortment), ring balogna, even good
    tube steak. Personally I'd prefer no sauce, just cook in a huge pile
    of sauerkraut... Silver Floss brand canned kraut is better for cooking
    than fresh... Silver Floss is suprisingly good for canned. Drain the
    kraut and replace with beer.

  8. #8
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Dec 17, 7:08*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >. Silver Floss brand canned kraut is better for cooking
    > than fresh... Silver Floss is suprisingly good for canned.


    The stopped clock is right! Silver Floss is my wife's family's
    favorite. Their Christmas Day sauerkraut will have been simmering with
    mushrooms and chunks of kielbasa for hours.

  9. #9
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    George wrote:
    > Pennyaline wrote:
    >> Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>
    >>> Look around for a good Polish grocery or deli. The stuff most have is
    >>> half the fat of Hillshire and has better flavor.
    >>> The place I go to has a few versions: extra lean, extra garlic, and
    >>> fresh.

    >>
    >> Oh, I wish. When I lived in Western New York, finding good Polish
    >> sausage was a no-brainer. It was everywhere.


    I lived in the NYC area for most of my life. I've bought kielbasa
    from many Pollock butcher shops, especially in Riverhead/Pollock Town.
    I didn't think it was anything special other than its exhorbitant
    price. If you want good kielbasa make your own, it's very easy...
    what do yur think the majority of Pollocks do, they won't pay those
    butcher shop prices for the quantity they need to feed their family,
    they make their own.

    > Here in the Salt Lake City
    >> region, however, things are different. The choices are Hillshire Farms,
    >> Johnsonville (okay, but only okay) and store brand. Meh. It's rare to
    >> find a deli with something decent, and meat markets are rarer.

    >
    >A number will ship.


    The prices are astronomical, especially the over night shipping
    charges.

    >If I had a choice of the hillsure kielbasa like product or none I would
    >go with none. I just can't get past the taste of it.


    I think you're full of doodoo... if you were that fussy about sausage
    you'd make your own... it's not difficult... and the same goes for
    anyone who bitches about Hillshire and claims to only buy from Pollock
    butchers. The ONLY way to have quality sausage is to make your own,
    ALL others are mystery meat. In fact the small neighborhood butcher
    shops use a far larger proportion of crappy mystery meat than
    Hillshire. When you're stupid enough to pay $8/lb for Pollock tube
    steak of course you're going to rave about it. Anyone with a decent
    meat grinder can make their own fresh sausage in however large batches
    and freeze it. I make up sausage and don't bother to stuff it into
    casings, I make patties and meat balls and freeze them... I can make
    up ten pounds from start to finish, including clean up, in under an
    hour... I can grind whatever texture I like and season however I like.
    When you buy kielbasa at a Pollock shop at those ridiculously high
    prices you're paying for labor and extra profit, NOT quality... those
    shops toss in all their scraps and trimmings. Sausage has always been
    a way to use those parts no one would eat otherwise, even a dog
    wouldn't eat those parts that Pollock butchers put in their kielbasa.
    Either make your own or STFU.

    For what it is I think Hillshire is fine, it's reasonably priced and
    always available everywhere. I think it tastes as good as any,
    however my only complaint is its texture, I prefer a coarser grind...
    but it's still a good product as commercial sausage goes... sausage is
    not intended to be porterhouse. I think most folks simply don't know
    how to cook sausage. And even more people are too much of a snob to
    admit they eat Hillshire... just lookit all the cheapo bastards who
    cry about the cost of a meat grinder but brag about buying mystery
    meat sausage from pricy butcher shops, makes me wonder if they really
    bought it more than once.

  10. #10
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >>. Silver Floss brand canned kraut is better for cooking
    >> than fresh... Silver Floss is suprisingly good for canned.

    >
    >The stopped clock is right! Silver Floss is my wife's family's
    >favorite. Their Christmas Day sauerkraut will have been simmering with
    >mushrooms and chunks of kielbasa for hours.


    Hmm, 'shrooms doesn't sound right with kraut or kielbasa.

  11. #11
    news Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa


    "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >>Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >>>. Silver Floss brand canned kraut is better for cooking
    >>> than fresh... Silver Floss is suprisingly good for canned.

    >>
    >>The stopped clock is right! Silver Floss is my wife's family's
    >>favorite. Their Christmas Day sauerkraut will have been simmering with
    >>mushrooms and chunks of kielbasa for hours.

    >
    > Hmm, 'shrooms doesn't sound right with kraut or kielbasa.


    My mom always made Slovak Mushroom Sauerkraut soup for Christmas Eve. She
    didn't put sausage in it but I bet it would be good, as in this recipe:
    http://www.slovakcooking.com/2009/recipes/kapustnica/



  12. #12
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Dec 17, 2:40*pm, "news" <n...@news.ru> wrote:
    > "Brooklyn1" <Gravesend1> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]..
    >
    > > spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > >>Brooklyn1 wrote:

    >
    > >>>. Silver Floss brand canned kraut is better for cooking
    > >>> than fresh... Silver Floss is suprisingly good for canned.

    >
    > >>The stopped clock is right! Silver Floss is my wife's family's
    > >>favorite. Their Christmas Day sauerkraut will have been simmering with
    > >>mushrooms and chunks of kielbasa for hours.

    >
    > > Hmm, 'shrooms doesn't sound right with kraut or kielbasa.

    >
    > My mom always made Slovak Mushroom Sauerkraut soup for Christmas Eve. She
    > didn't put sausage in it but I bet it would be good, as in this recipe:http://www.slovakcooking.com/2009/recipes/kapustnica/


    Heck, I'd eat that!!

  13. #13
    news Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa


    "Chemo the Clown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:9c826af6-7f3c-4efe-b9c5-9331c5c485f[email protected]..
    > My mom always made Slovak Mushroom Sauerkraut soup for Christmas Eve. She
    > didn't put sausage in it but I bet it would be good, as in this
    > recipe:http://www.slovakcooking.com/2009/recipes/kapustnica/


    >Heck, I'd eat that!!


    As kids, my brothers and I HATED it with a passion (try making kids eat
    sauerkraut and mushroom *anything*) but now it's the most delicious thing
    ever!




  14. #14
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz got all mendacious:

    > butchers. The ONLY way to have quality sausage is to make your own,
    > ALL others are mystery meat. In fact the small neighborhood butcher
    > shops use a far larger proportion of crappy mystery meat than
    > Hillshire. When you're stupid enough to pay $8/lb for Pollock tube
    > steak of course you're going to rave about it. Anyone with a decent
    > meat grinder can make their own fresh sausage in however large batches
    > and freeze it. I make up sausage and don't bother to stuff it into
    > casings, I make patties and meat balls and freeze them... I can make
    > up ten pounds from start to finish, including clean up, in under an
    > hour... I can grind whatever texture I like and season however I like.
    > When you buy kielbasa at a Pollock shop at those ridiculously high
    > prices you're paying for labor and extra profit, NOT quality


    You don't make kielbasa. You have neither the knowledge nor the ability. You
    make "dump" sausage from whatever you have on hand. Kielbasa is an
    emulsified sausage, a category of sausages about which you are utterly
    clueless.

    Bob



  15. #15
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Dec 17, 6:54*pm, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > Clueless AOL newbie Sheldon "Pussy" Katz got all mendacious:
    >
    > > butchers. *The ONLY way to have quality sausage is to make your own,
    > > ALL others are mystery meat. *In fact the small neighborhood butcher
    > > shops use a far larger proportion of crappy mystery meat than
    > > Hillshire. *When you're stupid enough to pay $8/lb for Pollock tube
    > > steak of course you're going to rave about it. *Anyone with a decent
    > > meat grinder can make their own fresh sausage in however large batches
    > > and freeze it. *I make up sausage and don't bother to stuff it into
    > > casings, I make patties and meat balls and freeze them... I can make
    > > up ten pounds from start to finish, including clean up, in under an
    > > hour... I can grind whatever texture I like and season however I like.
    > > When you buy kielbasa at a Pollock shop at those ridiculously high
    > > prices you're paying for labor and extra profit, NOT quality

    >
    > You don't make kielbasa. You have neither the knowledge nor the ability. You
    > make "dump" sausage from whatever you have on hand. Kielbasa is an
    > emulsified sausage, a category of sausages about which you are utterly
    > clueless.
    >
    > Bob


    Son of a bitch -- now I have to defend Brokelyn. Are there two full
    moons this month?

    None of the kielbasas are emulsified sausages. The recipes in, for
    example, the Strybels' Polish Heritage Cookery, all call for the meat
    to be diced, or, at most, coarsely ground.

    Fresh kielbasa requires no more than pork butts, salt, sugar, and
    garlic, along with casings. A funnel can be used to stuff the casings
    if no meat grinder/stuffer is available.

    Terwilliger is likely thinking of the spicy, usually red, hot dog
    called the "Polish" when served by hot dog stands. That indeed is
    emulsified.

  16. #16
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Sat, 17 Dec 2011 18:54:30 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    >
    > Kielbasa is an
    >emulsified sausage, a category of sausages about which you are utterly
    >clueless.
    >
    >Bob
    >


    You need to find a better supplier. I've never seen an emulsified
    kielbasa and I've made it and I've bought it at dozens of places.

  17. #17
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On Sat, 17 Dec 2011 18:54:30 -0800, "Bob Terwilliger"
    <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:


    >
    >. Kielbasa is an
    >emulsified sausage,


    No, it is not
    >


    Garlic Kielbasa
    Ingredients:
    4 ts Coarse (kosher) salt
    1 3/4 ts Ground black pepper
    3 tb Sweet Hungarian paprika
    1 ts Dried marjoram, crumbled
    1/2 ts Dried savory, crumbled
    2 ts Finely minced garlic
    10 oz Trimmed beef shin, cut into 1/2" dice and chilled
    16 oz Fresh pork fat, cut into 1/2" dice and chilled
    1/3 c Ice water
    1 1/4 lb Lean, trimmed pork, cut into 1" dice and chilled

    1. Mix together in a small bowl the salt, pepper, paprika, marjoram,
    savory, and garlic.

    2. In the container of a food processor combine the beef, half the
    pork fat, half the ice water, and half the mixed seasonings (see step
    1) and process to a very fine grind.Scrape into a mixing bowl.

    3. In a bowl combine the remaining seasonings, the pork, remaining
    pork fat, and remaining water. Process half of the mixture at a time
    to a coarse grind and add to the beef. Mix together very thoroughly,
    cover,and chill for 24 hours.

    4. Stuff the sausage into casings,tying links for 10 to 30 " long,
    depending upon your preference. Both sizes (and everything in between)
    are considered traditional. Hang the sausages in a cool, airy place
    for several hours at least, or until the skin is smooth, dry, and
    crackly. If it's too hot or humid to hang the sausages, refrigerate
    them, uncovered, for at least 12 hours. To store, refrigerate for up
    to 3 days, or freeze for longer keeping.

    To Cook: Place one or more sausages in a large skillet with water to
    come halfway up them. Bring to a simmer and cook for about 8 minutes,
    then turn and cook for about 8 minutes on the other side. Pour off the
    water, prick the sausages, and cook them over moderate heat until
    browned on both sides.

    Makes about 2-3/4 pounds


    Polish Kielbasa
    Ingredients:
    6 Ft 2-1/2" diameter hog casings
    3 lb Lean pork butt, cubed
    1 lb Lean beef chuck, cubed
    1/2 lb Veal, cubed
    1/2 lb Pork fat, cubed
    2 1/2 ts Salt, or to taste
    3 ts Finely ground black pepper
    2 ts Ground marjoram
    2 ts Ground summer savory
    1/2 ts Ground allspice
    3 Cloves garlic, finely minced
    2 tb Sweet paprika

    "Recipes for this sausage are so variable that what passes for
    kielbasa in one area might be regarded as not authentic in another.
    The ingredients and pronunciation of kielbasa are as variable as are
    the vagaries of the spring weather, the time of year when kielbasa is
    traditionally made. This version uses pork, beef, and veal and makes
    five lb"

    1. Prepare the casings.

    2. Grind the meats and fat together through
    the coarse disk.

    3. Mix the remaining ingredients with the meat.

    4. Stuff the casings and leave the sausage in long links. Lengths of
    eighteen inches to two feet are traditional.

    5. Allow the sausage to dry in a cool place for three or four hours or
    refrigerate for twenty-four hours uncovered.

    6. Cook by roasting in a 425~ F. oven for forty-five minutes. These
    sausages are also excellent grilled over a charcoal fire and eaten in
    a Kaiser roll, lathered with a spicy brown mustard.


    Lithuanian Kielbasa

    To 5 pounds coarsely ground pork butts add:

    1 heaping teaspoon pulverized whole mustard seeds,
    1 heaping teaspoon whole allspice and
    1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns.
    Add 1/2 large onion
    and 1 large clove garlic, finely minced;
    1/4 cup salt; and
    1/2 cup water.

    Mix thoroughly, and stuff into casings. Poach or boil for 20 minutes.
    Makes 6-8 servings.

    This recipe is from Domesticity: A Gastronomic Interpretation of Love
    by Bob Shacochis, copyright 1994 ISBN 0-684-19642-5



    Fresh Kielbasa

    Makes 5 pounds

    Everyone in Eastern Europe seems to have a variation on this sausage.
    Poland is most famous for their version, but I think this Lithuanian
    recipe from Bill Daileda of Saint Casmir's will keep all of Eastern
    Europe happy. It is the best that I have come across.

    Ingredients:

    1 tablespoons salt
    tablespoon ground allspice
    teaspoon garlic powder
    teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    teaspoon MSG (optional)

    1 pound beef chuck, cut into large pieces
    4 pounds pork butt, cut into large pieces
    1 pounds fresh pork fatback cut into large pieces

    1/2 cup cold water
    Sausage casings, about 14 feet, 1 inch in diameter

    Mix all the spices in a small jar. Shake well to mix them.

    Grind the meats and the fatback coarsely in a meat grinder or food
    processor. Place the mixture in a bowl. Add the seasonings and mix
    thoroughly through the meat. Mix in the cold water, which will make
    the meat easier to stuff.

    Stuff the mixture into casings

    From: Frugal Gourmet "On Our Immigrant Ancestors"



    Smoked Kielbasa

    This is Bill Daileda's version of smoked sausage, and it is a bit
    closer to what most Americans know as Polish sausage. It is Lithuanian
    in origin, however, and not as fatty as that stuff you get from the
    supermarket.

    Ingredients:

    1/2 teaspoon MSG (optional)
    1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
    3/4 tablespoon curing salt(made by Morton's and available in specialty
    shops or supermarkets)
    1 /2 tablespoons salt
    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    1/2 tablespoon ground allspice
    1/2 cup cold water
    1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

    4 pounds pork butt, coarsely ground
    1 pound beef, coarsely ground


    To prepare, follow the directions for the fresh kielbasa, but then tie
    the stuffed casings into rings and smoke them.


  18. #18
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    Ed wrote:

    >>. Kielbasa is an
    >>emulsified sausage,

    >
    > No, it is not
    >>

    >
    > Garlic Kielbasa
    > Ingredients:
    > 4 ts Coarse (kosher) salt
    > 1 3/4 ts Ground black pepper
    > 3 tb Sweet Hungarian paprika
    > 1 ts Dried marjoram, crumbled
    > 1/2 ts Dried savory, crumbled
    > 2 ts Finely minced garlic
    > 10 oz Trimmed beef shin, cut into 1/2" dice and chilled
    > 16 oz Fresh pork fat, cut into 1/2" dice and chilled
    > 1/3 c Ice water
    > 1 1/4 lb Lean, trimmed pork, cut into 1" dice and chilled
    >
    > 1. Mix together in a small bowl the salt, pepper, paprika, marjoram,
    > savory, and garlic.
    >
    > 2. In the container of a food processor combine the beef, half the
    > pork fat, half the ice water, and half the mixed seasonings (see step
    > 1) and process to a very fine grind.Scrape into a mixing bowl.


    See that step right there? That's called an emulsion.

    <snip remainder>

    Bob




  19. #19
    George Guest

    Default Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa

    On 12/17/2011 1:30 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > George wrote:
    >> Pennyaline wrote:
    >>> Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Look around for a good Polish grocery or deli. The stuff most have is
    >>>> half the fat of Hillshire and has better flavor.
    >>>> The place I go to has a few versions: extra lean, extra garlic, and
    >>>> fresh.
    >>>
    >>> Oh, I wish. When I lived in Western New York, finding good Polish
    >>> sausage was a no-brainer. It was everywhere.

    >
    > I lived in the NYC area for most of my life. I've bought kielbasa
    > from many Pollock butcher shops, especially in Riverhead/Pollock Town.
    > I didn't think it was anything special other than its exhorbitant
    > price. If you want good kielbasa make your own, it's very easy...
    > what do yur think the majority of Pollocks do, they won't pay those
    > butcher shop prices for the quantity they need to feed their family,
    > they make their own.
    >
    >> Here in the Salt Lake City
    >>> region, however, things are different. The choices are Hillshire Farms,
    >>> Johnsonville (okay, but only okay) and store brand. Meh. It's rare to
    >>> find a deli with something decent, and meat markets are rarer.

    >>
    >> A number will ship.

    >
    > The prices are astronomical, especially the over night shipping
    > charges.
    >
    >> If I had a choice of the hillsure kielbasa like product or none I would
    >> go with none. I just can't get past the taste of it.

    >
    > I think you're full of doodoo... if you were that fussy about sausage
    > you'd make your own... it's not difficult... and the same goes for
    > anyone who bitches about Hillshire and claims to only buy from Pollock
    > butchers. The ONLY way to have quality sausage is to make your own,
    > ALL others are mystery meat. In fact the small neighborhood butcher
    > shops use a far larger proportion of crappy mystery meat than
    > Hillshire. When you're stupid enough to pay $8/lb for Pollock tube
    > steak of course you're going to rave about it. Anyone with a decent
    > meat grinder can make their own fresh sausage in however large batches
    > and freeze it. I make up sausage and don't bother to stuff it into
    > casings, I make patties and meat balls and freeze them... I can make
    > up ten pounds from start to finish, including clean up, in under an
    > hour... I can grind whatever texture I like and season however I like.
    > When you buy kielbasa at a Pollock shop at those ridiculously high
    > prices you're paying for labor and extra profit, NOT quality... those
    > shops toss in all their scraps and trimmings. Sausage has always been
    > a way to use those parts no one would eat otherwise, even a dog
    > wouldn't eat those parts that Pollock butchers put in their kielbasa.
    > Either make your own or STFU.


    You confirm you are a relic from the past who doesn't get out much
    (guessing 20 years). Small minded people used to use all of those racial
    slurs then.

    So you are back to declaring you are omniscient?

    The guys son in one local shop is a friend of mine and I have have
    watched them make it. And the selling price is no where near $8/pound.


    >
    > For what it is I think Hillshire is fine, it's reasonably priced and
    > always available everywhere. I think it tastes as good as any,


    You mean as any industrial meat like product you can buy at walmart?

    If thats what you like good for you. It still doesn't make it good or
    comparable to a quality product.


    > however my only complaint is its texture, I prefer a coarser grind...
    > but it's still a good product as commercial sausage goes... sausage is
    > not intended to be porterhouse. I think most folks simply don't know
    > how to cook sausage. And even more people are too much of a snob to
    > admit they eat Hillshire... just lookit all the cheapo bastards who
    > cry about the cost of a meat grinder but brag about buying mystery
    > meat sausage from pricy butcher shops, makes me wonder if they really
    > bought it more than once.



  20. #20
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Kielbasa (was Re: Recipe with Hillshire Farm Polska Kielbasa)

    Bob Terwilliger <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote:

    > Kielbasa is an
    > emulsified sausage,


    Gentle reminder to anyone posting in this thread or elsewhere:
    "kielbasa" is just Polish for "sausage"... any kind of sausage.

    Victor

Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32