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Thread: REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

  1. #1
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

    Chanterelles are plentiful here again and sometimes cost less than at
    any time in the past six years or so. The quality is noticeably lower,
    though - mostly large, trumpet-shaped ones, rather than the superior
    small round-capped specimens. Yesterday, I bought 500 g (1.1 lbs)
    Lithuanian chanterelles for EUR 3.99 and cooked yet another soup with
    chanterelles, modifying my usual recipe a bit this time. I added a few
    dried cèpes (porcini), because chanterelles are never at all juicy and
    do not add much extra mushroom taste to the soup. If making soup with
    other mushrooms, particularly porcini, I would probably use just water
    and/or mushroom stock, with no meat or poultry stock.


    Pfifferlingsuppe auf meine Art
    Soup with chanterelles

    about 50 g (1.8 oz) pearl barley (large-sized)
    some sunflower oil
    1 large onion, finely chopped
    500 g (1.1 lb) fresh chanterelles
    1 large leek, the white and the tender green part chopped
    2 small carrots, peeled and diced
    about 2.5 l (2.5 quarts) mix of beef, chicken and mushroom stock,
    preferably all home-made, with mushroom stock predominating, hot
    about five medium-sized dried cèpes (porcini) mushrooms, crumbled and
    soaked in hot water for about an hour
    8 very small potatoes, peeled and diced
    salt and freshly-ground black pepper
    some chives, chopped
    some dill, torn
    sour cream

    1. Cook pearl barley in water until not quite ready, drain.

    2. Clean the chanterelles carefully with a brush, rinsing them if
    absolutely necessary, and chop the large ones.

    3. In a soup pot, heat the oil and fry the onions for a bit, add the
    chanterelles and fry a bit more. Add the leeks and the carrots and fry
    for a bit longer still.

    4. Pour in the heated stock mixture and simmer for about 30 minutes.

    5. Add the cèpes, together with their strained soaking liquid and
    simmer for about 25 minutes.

    6. Add the pearl barley and the potatoes. Simmer for about 15
    minutes. Season to taste and serve, putting a dollop of sour cream in
    each plate and sprinkling with chives and dill.

    Victor

  2. #2
    The Ranger Guest

    Default Re: REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

    On Sep 13, 3:09*am, azaze...@koroviev.de (Victor Sack) wrote:
    > Chanterelles are plentiful here again and sometimes cost less than at
    > any time in the past six years or so. *The quality is noticeably lower,
    > though - mostly large, trumpet-shaped ones, rather than the superior
    > small round-capped specimens. *Yesterday, I bought 500 g (1.1 lbs)
    > Lithuanian chanterelles for EUR 3.99 and cooked yet another soup with
    > chanterelles, modifying my usual recipe a bit this time. *I added a few
    > dried cèpes (porcini), because chanterelles are never at all juicy and
    > do not add much extra mushroom taste to the soup. *If making soup with
    > other mushrooms, particularly porcini, I would probably use just water
    > and/or mushroom stock, with no meat or poultry stock.
    >
    > * * * * * * * * Pfifferlingsuppe auf meine Art
    > * * * * * * * * * *Soup with chanterelles
    >
    > about 50 g (1.8 oz) pearl barley (large-sized)
    > some sunflower oil
    > 1 large onion, finely chopped
    > 500 g (1.1 lb) fresh chanterelles
    > 1 large leek, the white and the tender green part chopped
    > 2 small carrots, peeled and diced
    > about 2.5 l (2.5 quarts) mix of beef, chicken and mushroom stock,
    > * * * * preferably all home-made, with mushroom stock predominating, hot
    > about five medium-sized dried cèpes (porcini) mushrooms, crumbled and
    > * * * * soaked in hot water for about an hour
    > 8 very small potatoes, peeled and diced
    > salt and freshly-ground black pepper
    > some chives, chopped
    > some dill, torn
    > sour cream
    >
    > 1. *Cook pearl barley in water until not quite ready, drain.
    >
    > 2. *Clean the chanterelles carefully with a brush, rinsing them if
    > absolutely necessary, and chop the large ones.
    >
    > 3. *In a soup pot, heat the oil and fry the onions for a bit, add the
    > chanterelles and fry a bit more. *Add the leeks and the carrots and fry
    > for a bit longer still. *
    >
    > 4. *Pour in the heated stock mixture and simmer for about 30 minutes.
    >
    > 5. *Add the cèpes, together with their strained soaking liquid and
    > simmer for about 25 minutes.
    >
    > 6. *Add the pearl barley and the potatoes. *Simmer for about *15
    > minutes. *Season to taste and serve, putting a dollop of sour cream in
    > each plate and sprinkling with chives and dill.


    Saved and kept for this evening's starter. Thanks, Victor. If
    chanterelles are too costly, would oyster and ****ake mushrooms offer
    a similar heartiness?

    The Ranger

  3. #3
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

    The Ranger <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If
    > chanterelles are too costly, would oyster and ****ake mushrooms offer
    > a similar heartiness?


    If they are good, they may well offer even more. Chanterelles are great
    mushrooms, but they are not the best for soup, not being "juicy". The
    best, by far, mushrooms for soup are cèpes/porcini. They are wonderful
    fresh or dry, but deliver different results in each case. For more
    heartiness, I'd use dried mushrooms.

    Victor

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

    In article <1j5zxf6.af2m3ifrt5z4N%[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Victor Sack) wrote:

    > The Ranger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > If
    > > chanterelles are too costly, would oyster and ****ake mushrooms offer
    > > a similar heartiness?

    >
    > If they are good, they may well offer even more. Chanterelles are great
    > mushrooms, but they are not the best for soup, not being "juicy". The
    > best, by far, mushrooms for soup are cèpes/porcini. They are wonderful
    > fresh or dry, but deliver different results in each case. For more
    > heartiness, I'd use dried mushrooms.
    >
    > Victor


    Victor, I bought some fresh frozen Porcinis awhile back but have not
    tried them yet. You suggest I use them in a soup? I was thinking about
    serving them with eggs.
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

  5. #5
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

    Omelet wrote:

    > Victor, I bought some fresh frozen Porcinis awhile back but have not
    > tried them yet. You suggest I use them in a soup? I was thinking about
    > serving them with eggs.


    I don't really know. I have never used frozen porcini. I suspect their
    texture will suffer somewhat if you defrost them, so maybe soup is a
    better option, as texture is not as important in a soup and you don't
    even have to defrost the mushrooms beforehand. Why not try them both
    ways?

    Victor

  6. #6
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: REC: Yet Another Chanterelle Soup

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Victor Sack <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > Victor, I bought some fresh frozen Porcinis awhile back but have not
    > > tried them yet. You suggest I use them in a soup? I was thinking about
    > > serving them with eggs.

    >
    > I don't really know. I have never used frozen porcini. I suspect their
    > texture will suffer somewhat if you defrost them, so maybe soup is a
    > better option, as texture is not as important in a soup and you don't
    > even have to defrost the mushrooms beforehand. Why not try them both
    > ways?
    >
    > Victor


    Ok, thanks!
    They were sure a lot cheaper than fresh!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "Human nature seems to be to control other people until they put their foot down."
    --Steve Rothstein

    [email protected]
    Subscribe: [email protected]

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