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Thread: rec: Seed Cakes

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default rec: Seed Cakes

    This recipe is somewhat different from others I have seen. Look
    at all that rosewater! We have been speaking about rosewater on
    rfc, so I perked right up when I saw that. I wonder how much
    adhered to the butter?

    Note, I am crossposting this one, so eliminate one of the groups
    when you reply.

    Seed Cakes
    Source: American Cookery, December 1919, page 346.
    Formatted etc. by Jean B.

    This is from an article on Christmas in times past, and is
    supposed to be from the year 1700.

    1 c butter
    1/2 c rosewater
    2 c sugar
    4 eggs, beaten
    3 drops oil of cinnamon or 3/4 tsp ground cinnamon
    3 Tbsps caraway seed
    1/2 tsp salt
    1/2 tsp saleratus [sub. 1/2 tsp + 1/8 tsp baking soda?]
    1/2 c boiling water
    4 c flour
    milk, if necessary

    Wash the butter in rosewater.* Cream the butter and add sugar.
    [I think I'd cream the butter and the sugar.] Add eggs, spices,
    salt, and saleratus which has been dissolved in the hot water. Add
    flour and, if necessary, a little milk, to form a stiff paste.
    Drop on buttered paper in lumps the size of nutmegs. Bake in a
    moderate oven.

    *Does anyone know about this practice?
    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    Henriette Kress Guest

    Default Re: rec: Seed Cakes

    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:


    > Wash the butter in rosewater.* Cream the butter and add sugar.


    > *Does anyone know about this practice?


    You rub room-temperature butter with rosewater. The butter will take up the
    scent of the rose.

    Dunno if you'd use the remaining rosewater in the recipe, though.

    Henriette

    --
    Henriette Kress, AHG Helsinki, Finland
    Henriette's herbal homepage: http://www.henriettesherbal.com

  3. #3
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Seed Cakes

    Henriette Kress wrote:
    > "Jean B." <jbxyz@rcn.[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >> Wash the butter in rosewater.* Cream the butter and add sugar.

    >
    >> *Does anyone know about this practice?

    >
    > You rub room-temperature butter with rosewater. The butter will take up the
    > scent of the rose.
    >
    > Dunno if you'd use the remaining rosewater in the recipe, though.
    >
    > Henriette
    >


    I don't know either. I was kind-of excite to see that amount of
    rosewater, but then I wonder how much of it ends up in the recipe.
    One would sure want to use the strong one that Wayne spoke about
    if it was a small amount.

    --
    Jean B.

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