Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: REC: Primal Moussaka

  1. #1
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default REC: Primal Moussaka

    I'm eating "primal" as much as possible. Last week I saw a short
    cut moussaka recipe in the New York Times where the author used mashed
    potatoes instead of the bechamel for the topping for moussaka. A
    light bulb went off in my head that I could use cauliflower puree.
    So I came up with this recipe.

    I made it over the weekend. OMG. This is really really good. It's
    low carb, high protein and so very flavorful. It's good hot but it's
    wonderful the next day as the flavors bloom.
    And it's yummy cold.


    Primal Moussaka

    2 medium eggplant (about 2 pounds), cut into 3/4-inch cubes (I peeled
    the eggplant in strips leaving about half the peel but you can peel it
    or not to your taste).
    handful of salt
    1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil

    Large head of cauliflower washed and broken into florettes
    2/3 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    1 T parsley flakes
    2 large eggs
    3/4 cup grated Parmesan
    1/4 cup feta crumbles
    4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
    1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
    1 teaspoon dried parsley

    1 pound ground lamb (or beef)
    1 very large onion, finely chopped
    2 cinnamon sticks
    2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
    1/4 teaspoon ground clove
    1/3 cup fresh parsley chopped
    1 teaspoon dried marjoram
    can of crushed tomatoes
    1/2 teaspoon pepper

    1. In a colander, toss the eggplant and 1 teaspoon salt. Drain in the
    sink for 15 minutes.

    2. Heat oven to 450 degrees Toss the eggplant with the oil and spread
    on
    a large oiled baking sheet. Roast, turning occasionally, until golden
    and tender,
    about 40 minutes.

    Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees.

    2. Bring 6 cups water, the cauliflower and 1 tablespoon salt to a boil
    in a
    large pot over high heat. Lower heat and simmer until cauliflower is
    tender, about 20 minutes; drain, cool down a bit, (don't want the eggs
    to scramble) and put cauliflower in a food processor with beaten eggs
    and sour cream (or greek yogurt), cheese, butter, 1/4 teaspoon salt,
    parsley and nutmeg. Pulse and run till pureed. Taste and adjust
    seasonings if needed.

    3. In a very large skillet over medium-high heat, brown the lamb,
    breaking
    it up with a fork as it cooks. Season with 1/4 teaspoon salt. Add the
    onions and cinnamon sticks to the skillet. Cook until the onions are
    soft,
    about 5 minutes. Stir the lamb back into the onions and add the
    garlic,
    parsley, marjoram and ground clove. Cook 2 minutes more. Stir in the
    tomatoes, 1/2
    teaspoon salt, and pepper. Cook until tomatoes are soft and the
    mixture
    is thick, about 10 minutes. Remove the cinnamon sticks and stir in the
    eggplant.

    4. Spoon into a 9-inch baking dish. Spread the cauliflower mixture
    over
    the lamb. Sprinkle some feta on the top. Bake until top is golden
    brown and slightly crusty, about 30 minutes. Cool 10 minutes before
    serving.

    Yield: 6 servings.

  2. #2
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    On Fri, 4 Nov 2011 07:44:01 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm eating "primal" as much as possible. Last week I saw a short
    >cut moussaka recipe in the New York Times where the author used mashed
    >potatoes instead of the bechamel for the topping for moussaka. A
    >light bulb went off in my head that I could use cauliflower puree.
    >So I came up with this recipe.
    >
    >I made it over the weekend. OMG. This is really really good. It's
    >low carb, high protein and so very flavorful. It's good hot but it's
    >wonderful the next day as the flavors bloom.
    >And it's yummy cold.
    >
    >
    >Primal Moussaka
    >
    >2 medium eggplant (about 2 pounds), cut into 3/4-inch cubes (I peeled
    >the eggplant in strips leaving about half the peel but you can peel it
    >or not to your taste).
    >handful of salt
    >1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
    >
    >Large head of cauliflower washed and broken into florettes
    >2/3 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    >1 T parsley flakes
    >2 large eggs
    >3/4 cup grated Parmesan
    >1/4 cup feta crumbles
    >4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
    >1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
    >1 teaspoon dried parsley
    >
    >1 pound ground lamb (or beef)
    >1 very large onion, finely chopped
    >2 cinnamon sticks
    >2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
    >1/4 teaspoon ground clove
    >1/3 cup fresh parsley chopped
    >1 teaspoon dried marjoram
    > can of crushed tomatoes
    >1/2 teaspoon pepper
    >
    >1. In a colander, toss the eggplant and 1 teaspoon salt. Drain in the
    >sink for 15 minutes.
    >
    >2. Heat oven to 450 degrees Toss the eggplant with the oil and spread
    >on
    >a large oiled baking sheet. Roast, turning occasionally, until golden
    >and tender,
    >about 40 minutes.
    >
    >Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees.
    >
    >2. Bring 6 cups water, the cauliflower and 1 tablespoon salt to a boil
    >in a
    >large pot over high heat. Lower heat and simmer until cauliflower is
    >tender, about 20 minutes; drain, cool down a bit, (don't want the eggs
    >to scramble) and put cauliflower in a food processor with beaten eggs
    >and sour cream (or greek yogurt), cheese, butter, 1/4 teaspoon salt,
    >parsley and nutmeg. Pulse and run till pureed. Taste and adjust
    >seasonings if needed.
    >
    >3. In a very large skillet over medium-high heat, brown the lamb,
    >breaking
    >it up with a fork as it cooks. Season with 1/4 teaspoon salt. Add the
    >onions and cinnamon sticks to the skillet. Cook until the onions are
    >soft,
    >about 5 minutes. Stir the lamb back into the onions and add the
    >garlic,
    >parsley, marjoram and ground clove. Cook 2 minutes more. Stir in the
    >tomatoes, 1/2
    >teaspoon salt, and pepper. Cook until tomatoes are soft and the
    >mixture
    >is thick, about 10 minutes. Remove the cinnamon sticks and stir in the
    >eggplant.
    >
    >4. Spoon into a 9-inch baking dish. Spread the cauliflower mixture
    >over
    >the lamb. Sprinkle some feta on the top. Bake until top is golden
    >brown and slightly crusty, about 30 minutes. Cool 10 minutes before
    >serving.
    >
    >Yield: 6 servings.


    I wish you were here to fix it for me. It sounds like a lot of work
    but it also sounds delicious and like something I would really like.
    I've saved it and the idea. Thanks
    Janet US

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    On Nov 4, 8:08*am, Janet Bostwick <nos...@cableone.net> wrote:
    >
    > I wish you were here to fix it for me. *It sounds like a lot of work
    > but it also sounds delicious and like something I would really like.
    > I've saved it and the idea. *Thanks
    > Janet US- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Not any more work than making 'regular' moussaka and tastes just as
    good !!

    I doubled the recipe and made a great big casserole dish full !!

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    On Fri, 4 Nov 2011 07:44:01 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm eating "primal" as much as possible. Last week I saw a short
    > cut moussaka recipe in the New York Times where the author used mashed
    > potatoes instead of the bechamel for the topping for moussaka. A
    > light bulb went off in my head that I could use cauliflower puree.
    > So I came up with this recipe.
    >
    > I made it over the weekend. OMG. This is really really good. It's
    > low carb, high protein and so very flavorful. It's good hot but it's
    > wonderful the next day as the flavors bloom.
    > And it's yummy cold.
    >
    >
    > Primal Moussaka


    <recipe snipped> Great! I'm going to try that soon. Not low
    carbing, but love substituting cauliflower for mashed potatoes. Try
    it on a pot pie or shepherd's pie sometime.

    --
    All you need is love. But a little chocolate now and then doesn't hurt.

  5. #5
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    On Nov 4, 2:05*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >
    > <recipe snipped> *Great! *I'm going to try that soon. *Not low
    > carbing, but love substituting cauliflower for mashed potatoes. *Try
    > it on a pot pie or shepherd's pie sometime.



    Yup. Planning on it. I never was that big into cauliflower but since
    I started making purees and adding different
    things in it to change the flavors a bit I've become very fond of
    it. I even make pizza crust and 'rice' out of it.




  6. #6
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'm eating "primal" as much as possible. Last week I saw a short
    > cut moussaka recipe in the New York Times where the author used mashed
    > potatoes instead of the bechamel for the topping for moussaka. A
    > light bulb went off in my head that I could use cauliflower puree.
    > So I came up with this recipe.
    >
    > I made it over the weekend. OMG. This is really really good. It's
    > low carb, high protein and so very flavorful. It's good hot but it's
    > wonderful the next day as the flavors bloom.
    > And it's yummy cold.


    I'm sure it tastes good. Please don't call it moussaka, though. ;-)

    --
    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    On Nov 4, 3:15*pm, Ran e at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    wrote:
    >
    > * *I'm sure it tastes good. *Please don't call it moussaka, though.*;-)
    >


    Why not?

  8. #8
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: REC: Primal Moussaka

    On Nov 4, 3:51*pm, ImStillMags <sitara8...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Nov 4, 3:15*pm, Ran e at Arabian Knits <arabiankn...@gmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > * *I'm sure it tastes good. *Please don't call it moussaka, though. *;-)

    >
    > Why not?


    If the New York Times can call what they did moussaka, so can I !! ;-)

  9. #9
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Primal Moussaka

    now this sounds good, especially with lamb, Lee
    "ImStillMags" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I'm eating "primal" as much as possible. Last week I saw a short
    > cut moussaka recipe in the New York Times where the author used mashed
    > potatoes instead of the bechamel for the topping for moussaka. A
    > light bulb went off in my head that I could use cauliflower puree.
    > So I came up with this recipe.
    >
    > I made it over the weekend. OMG. This is really really good. It's
    > low carb, high protein and so very flavorful. It's good hot but it's
    > wonderful the next day as the flavors bloom.
    > And it's yummy cold.
    >
    >
    > Primal Moussaka
    >
    > 2 medium eggplant (about 2 pounds), cut into 3/4-inch cubes (I peeled
    > the eggplant in strips leaving about half the peel but you can peel it
    > or not to your taste).
    > handful of salt
    > 1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil
    >
    > Large head of cauliflower washed and broken into florettes
    > 2/3 cup sour cream or Greek yogurt
    > 1 T parsley flakes
    > 2 large eggs
    > 3/4 cup grated Parmesan
    > 1/4 cup feta crumbles
    > 4 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
    > 1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg
    > 1 teaspoon dried parsley
    >
    > 1 pound ground lamb (or beef)
    > 1 very large onion, finely chopped
    > 2 cinnamon sticks
    > 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
    > 1/4 teaspoon ground clove
    > 1/3 cup fresh parsley chopped
    > 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
    > can of crushed tomatoes
    > 1/2 teaspoon pepper
    >
    > 1. In a colander, toss the eggplant and 1 teaspoon salt. Drain in the
    > sink for 15 minutes.
    >
    > 2. Heat oven to 450 degrees Toss the eggplant with the oil and spread
    > on
    > a large oiled baking sheet. Roast, turning occasionally, until golden
    > and tender,
    > about 40 minutes.
    >
    > Reduce oven temperature to 400 degrees.
    >
    > 2. Bring 6 cups water, the cauliflower and 1 tablespoon salt to a boil
    > in a
    > large pot over high heat. Lower heat and simmer until cauliflower is
    > tender, about 20 minutes; drain, cool down a bit, (don't want the eggs
    > to scramble) and put cauliflower in a food processor with beaten eggs
    > and sour cream (or greek yogurt), cheese, butter, 1/4 teaspoon salt,
    > parsley and nutmeg. Pulse and run till pureed. Taste and adjust
    > seasonings if needed.
    >
    > 3. In a very large skillet over medium-high heat, brown the lamb,
    > breaking
    > it up with a fork as it cooks. Season with 1/4 teaspoon salt. Add the
    > onions and cinnamon sticks to the skillet. Cook until the onions are
    > soft,
    > about 5 minutes. Stir the lamb back into the onions and add the
    > garlic,
    > parsley, marjoram and ground clove. Cook 2 minutes more. Stir in the
    > tomatoes, 1/2
    > teaspoon salt, and pepper. Cook until tomatoes are soft and the
    > mixture
    > is thick, about 10 minutes. Remove the cinnamon sticks and stir in the
    > eggplant.
    >
    > 4. Spoon into a 9-inch baking dish. Spread the cauliflower mixture
    > over
    > the lamb. Sprinkle some feta on the top. Bake until top is golden
    > brown and slightly crusty, about 30 minutes. Cool 10 minutes before
    > serving.
    >
    > Yield: 6 servings.




Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32