Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: rec: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default rec: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce

    They only THINK that this sauce, old-fashioned even in 1925, is
    chewy. I wonder how this compares with Wayne's TNT sauce? I also
    wonder about the addition of molasses, which has such a dominant
    flavor.

    "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce
    Source: American Cookery, April 1925, page 696.
    Formatted etc. by Jean B.

    1 1/2 c light brown sugar
    4 Tbsps molasses
    1 Tbsp butter
    3/4 c boiling water
    1 tsp extract of your choice (opt.)
    1/4 c hot water

    Put the first four ingredients into a porcelain saucepan. Cook,
    without stirring, until a half tsp of the mixture dropped in a tin
    cup half full of ice water immediately coagulates (when the cup is
    shaken, it should rattle against the side). Then remove at once
    from the fire, add extract if desired, and beat in a generous 1/4
    c of hot water. Pour at once over ice cream.

    "We have never tested this recipe, but we would warn you against
    beating too much, for this will make the sauce tender and short,
    rather than tough and chewy. Also, it is possible that the last
    addition of hot water may be omitted."
    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce


    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > They only THINK that this sauce, old-fashioned even in 1925, is chewy. I
    > wonder how this compares with Wayne's TNT sauce? I also wonder about the
    > addition of molasses, which has such a dominant flavor.
    >
    > "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce
    > Source: American Cookery, April 1925, page 696.
    > Formatted etc. by Jean B.
    >
    > 1 1/2 c light brown sugar
    > 4 Tbsps molasses
    > 1 Tbsp butter
    > 3/4 c boiling water
    > 1 tsp extract of your choice (opt.)
    > 1/4 c hot water
    >
    > Put the first four ingredients into a porcelain saucepan. Cook, without
    > stirring, until a half tsp of the mixture dropped in a tin cup half full
    > of ice water immediately coagulates (when the cup is shaken, it should
    > rattle against the side). Then remove at once from the fire, add extract
    > if desired, and beat in a generous 1/4 c of hot water. Pour at once over
    > ice cream.
    >
    > "We have never tested this recipe, but we would warn you against beating
    > too much, for this will make the sauce tender and short, rather than tough
    > and chewy. Also, it is possible that the last addition of hot water may
    > be omitted."
    > --
    > Jean B.



    In case you're interested here are a few more.

    Dimitri

    1 egg
    1/4 c. water
    1/3 c. white corn syrup
    1/4 c. butter
    2/3 c. brown sugar

    Mix well and boil in double boiler until thick. Store in refrigerator.

    1 qt. water
    1 1/2 c. milk
    1 1/4 c. butter
    2 tbsp. vanilla extract

    Dissolve sugar in water; bring to a boil with stirring to 235 degrees.
    Remove from heat; cool to lukewarm. Add milk slowly; add vanilla and
    butter. Beat until smooth, cool, and thick.

    2 1/4 c. sugar
    1 1/2 c. light Karo
    1 c. whipping cream
    1/2 c. half and half
    3/4 tsp. salt
    3/4 c. butter

    Cook until 230 degrees on thermometer. Add an additional 1 cup whipping
    cream and 1/2 cup half and half. Cook until 220 degrees. Take off stove.
    Then add 9 tablespoons half and half, and 3/4 teaspoon vanilla.

    4 tbsp. butter
    1 1/4 c. brown sugar
    2/3 c. white Karo

    Bring to soft ball stage. Boil about 4 minutes. Add 3/4 cup canned milk.
    Blend in blender. Excellent served over ice cream.

    1 c. packed brown sugar
    1/4 c. evaporated milk
    2 tbsp. butter
    2 tbsp. light corn syrup

    Combine sugar, milk, butter, and syrup in medium saucepan. Heat to a boil,
    stirring frequently. Reduce heat. Simmer and stir about 6-8 minutes or
    until sauce is thickened. Then remove from heat and serve.


    1/2 c. Milnot
    3 tbsp. oleo
    1/4 tsp. butter salt
    1 1/2 c. packed brown sugar
    1 tsp. vanilla

    Microwave: Evaporated milk or Milnot, brown sugar and butter in 4 cup
    measure. Cook uncovered 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Tip: For more
    sauce, use 2 quart casserole, double ingredients and cook 6 minutes. Triple
    recipe for 1 quart of sauce. Stonington, IL

    1 1/2 c. light brown sugar
    4 tbsp. butter
    2/3 c. white corn syrup
    2/3 c. evaporated milk

    Combine sugar, butter and syrup. Stir constantly over low heat until
    mixture boils. Stop stirring. Cook until mixture forms a soft ball in cold
    water (240 degrees) cool slightly add evaporated milk. Pour over ice cream
    or whatever.

    2/3 c. light syrup
    1 1/4 c. brown sugar
    1 tsp. vanilla
    1/4 c. butter
    3/4 c. cream

    Cook syrup, butter and sugar to soft ball stage. Add cream and vanilla.
    Blend in well and cool. Makes 3 cups.

    1 c. brown sugar
    1/4 c. top milk (light cream)
    2 tbsp. white corn syrup
    3 tbsp. butter

    Mix and boil for 3 minutes. This can be made into chocolate sauce by
    adding 1 square of melted Baker's chocolate or mix cocoa with brown sugar.


    1 lb. (2 c.) brown sugar
    1/2 c. butter
    1/2 pt. (1 c.) coffee cream
    1 tsp. vanilla

    Mix together and boil 5 minutes. Stir. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Put over
    ice cream. Makes 2 cups.


    2 c. brown sugar
    6 tbsp. butter
    1 1/2 c. hot water

    Melt butter in saucepan and add brown sugar. Continue stirring until
    butter and sugar are well mixed. Add hot water and cook 10 minutes. Cool.
    Place in ice box to chill.

    1 c. brown sugar, packed
    1/4 c. milk
    2 tbsp. corn syrup
    4 tbsp. REAL butter

    Boil all ingredients until it forms a soft ball when tested in cold water.
    (Remove before "soft ball" stage if you like a thinner sauce). I test if on
    ice cream! Excellent on plain cake, angel cake but superb on ice cream.


    1 c. brown sugar
    1 c. white sugar
    1 c. water
    1 tsp. vanilla
    1/2 c. flour
    1 c. butter
    Dash of salt

    Combine sugars, flours and water and stir until smooth. Cook over low
    heat until sugar is dissolved. Add vanilla, salt and butter. Cook and stir
    until butter is melted.


    1 1/2 c. dark brown sugar
    4 tbsp. flour
    1 c. boiling water
    Pinch salt
    4 tbsp. butter
    2 tbsp. cream
    1/2 tsp. vanilla

    Mix the sugar with the flour. Pour in the boiling water and add salt.
    Cook in a saucepan, stirring frequently for about 8 minutes. If it seems
    too thick, add a touch more boiling water. Remove from the range and stir
    in butter, cream and vanilla.

    1 beaten egg
    1/4 c. butter or oleo
    1/4 c. water
    2/3 c. brown sugar
    1/3 c. white corn syrup

    Cook until thick, stirring frequently.

    1 1/4 c. sugar
    3/4 c. corn syrup
    1 tbsp. butter
    1/2 pt. thin cream
    1/2 tsp. salt

    Mix. Cook to softball stage (234 degrees on candy thermometer). Serve
    over ice cream or dessert.


    1 tbsp. cornstarch
    1 1/4 c. light brown sugar
    1/2 c. half & half
    2 tbsp. light corn syrup
    1/8 tsp. salt
    1/4 c. butter
    1 tsp. vanilla

    In 1 1/2 quart glass bowl, stir together cornstarch and brown sugar. Stir
    in half & half, corn syrup, and salt. Add butter. Cover and microwave at
    high 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 minutes, stirring after 2 minutes to smooth and thicken
    and sugar is dissolved. Add vanilla and stir again to blend. Serve warm or
    cold. Store in refrigerator and reheat as necessary. *Great served warm
    over pound cake and banana slices or crepe filled with sliced bananas.


    2/3 c. corn syrup
    1 c. light brown sugar
    1/4 c. BUTTER
    2/3 c. evaporated milk or cream

    Boil together corn syrup, brown sugar and butter until consistency of heavy
    syrup. Cool slightly. Add milk. Makes 1 pint.


  3. #3
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce

    A few! I wonder which of these is "chewy"--which is what caught
    my eye.

    --
    Jean B.

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> They only THINK that this sauce, old-fashioned even in 1925, is
    >> chewy. I wonder how this compares with Wayne's TNT sauce? I also
    >> wonder about the addition of molasses, which has such a dominant flavor.
    >>
    >> "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce
    >> Source: American Cookery, April 1925, page 696.
    >> Formatted etc. by Jean B.
    >>
    >> 1 1/2 c light brown sugar
    >> 4 Tbsps molasses
    >> 1 Tbsp butter
    >> 3/4 c boiling water
    >> 1 tsp extract of your choice (opt.)
    >> 1/4 c hot water
    >>
    >> Put the first four ingredients into a porcelain saucepan. Cook,
    >> without stirring, until a half tsp of the mixture dropped in a tin cup
    >> half full of ice water immediately coagulates (when the cup is shaken,
    >> it should rattle against the side). Then remove at once from the
    >> fire, add extract if desired, and beat in a generous 1/4 c of hot
    >> water. Pour at once over ice cream.
    >>
    >> "We have never tested this recipe, but we would warn you against
    >> beating too much, for this will make the sauce tender and short,
    >> rather than tough and chewy. Also, it is possible that the last
    >> addition of hot water may be omitted."
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    >
    > In case you're interested here are a few more.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    > 1 egg
    > 1/4 c. water
    > 1/3 c. white corn syrup
    > 1/4 c. butter
    > 2/3 c. brown sugar
    >
    > Mix well and boil in double boiler until thick. Store in refrigerator.
    >
    > 1 qt. water
    > 1 1/2 c. milk
    > 1 1/4 c. butter
    > 2 tbsp. vanilla extract
    >
    > Dissolve sugar in water; bring to a boil with stirring to 235 degrees.
    > Remove from heat; cool to lukewarm. Add milk slowly; add vanilla and
    > butter. Beat until smooth, cool, and thick.
    >
    > 2 1/4 c. sugar
    > 1 1/2 c. light Karo
    > 1 c. whipping cream
    > 1/2 c. half and half
    > 3/4 tsp. salt
    > 3/4 c. butter
    >
    > Cook until 230 degrees on thermometer. Add an additional 1 cup whipping
    > cream and 1/2 cup half and half. Cook until 220 degrees. Take off
    > stove. Then add 9 tablespoons half and half, and 3/4 teaspoon vanilla.
    >
    > 4 tbsp. butter
    > 1 1/4 c. brown sugar
    > 2/3 c. white Karo
    >
    > Bring to soft ball stage. Boil about 4 minutes. Add 3/4 cup canned
    > milk. Blend in blender. Excellent served over ice cream.
    >
    > 1 c. packed brown sugar
    > 1/4 c. evaporated milk
    > 2 tbsp. butter
    > 2 tbsp. light corn syrup
    >
    > Combine sugar, milk, butter, and syrup in medium saucepan. Heat to a
    > boil, stirring frequently. Reduce heat. Simmer and stir about 6-8
    > minutes or until sauce is thickened. Then remove from heat and serve.
    >
    >
    > 1/2 c. Milnot
    > 3 tbsp. oleo
    > 1/4 tsp. butter salt
    > 1 1/2 c. packed brown sugar
    > 1 tsp. vanilla
    >
    > Microwave: Evaporated milk or Milnot, brown sugar and butter in 4 cup
    > measure. Cook uncovered 4 minutes, stirring occasionally. Tip: For
    > more sauce, use 2 quart casserole, double ingredients and cook 6
    > minutes. Triple recipe for 1 quart of sauce. Stonington, IL
    >
    > 1 1/2 c. light brown sugar
    > 4 tbsp. butter
    > 2/3 c. white corn syrup
    > 2/3 c. evaporated milk
    >
    > Combine sugar, butter and syrup. Stir constantly over low heat until
    > mixture boils. Stop stirring. Cook until mixture forms a soft ball in
    > cold water (240 degrees) cool slightly add evaporated milk. Pour over
    > ice cream or whatever.
    >
    > 2/3 c. light syrup
    > 1 1/4 c. brown sugar
    > 1 tsp. vanilla
    > 1/4 c. butter
    > 3/4 c. cream
    >
    > Cook syrup, butter and sugar to soft ball stage. Add cream and vanilla.
    > Blend in well and cool. Makes 3 cups.
    >
    > 1 c. brown sugar
    > 1/4 c. top milk (light cream)
    > 2 tbsp. white corn syrup
    > 3 tbsp. butter
    >
    > Mix and boil for 3 minutes. This can be made into chocolate sauce by
    > adding 1 square of melted Baker's chocolate or mix cocoa with brown sugar.
    >
    >
    > 1 lb. (2 c.) brown sugar
    > 1/2 c. butter
    > 1/2 pt. (1 c.) coffee cream
    > 1 tsp. vanilla
    >
    > Mix together and boil 5 minutes. Stir. Add 1 teaspoon vanilla. Put
    > over ice cream. Makes 2 cups.
    >
    >
    > 2 c. brown sugar
    > 6 tbsp. butter
    > 1 1/2 c. hot water
    >
    > Melt butter in saucepan and add brown sugar. Continue stirring until
    > butter and sugar are well mixed. Add hot water and cook 10 minutes.
    > Cool. Place in ice box to chill.
    >
    > 1 c. brown sugar, packed
    > 1/4 c. milk
    > 2 tbsp. corn syrup
    > 4 tbsp. REAL butter
    >
    > Boil all ingredients until it forms a soft ball when tested in cold
    > water. (Remove before "soft ball" stage if you like a thinner sauce). I
    > test if on ice cream! Excellent on plain cake, angel cake but superb on
    > ice cream.
    >
    >
    > 1 c. brown sugar
    > 1 c. white sugar
    > 1 c. water
    > 1 tsp. vanilla
    > 1/2 c. flour
    > 1 c. butter
    > Dash of salt
    >
    > Combine sugars, flours and water and stir until smooth. Cook over low
    > heat until sugar is dissolved. Add vanilla, salt and butter. Cook and
    > stir until butter is melted.
    >
    >
    > 1 1/2 c. dark brown sugar
    > 4 tbsp. flour
    > 1 c. boiling water
    > Pinch salt
    > 4 tbsp. butter
    > 2 tbsp. cream
    > 1/2 tsp. vanilla
    >
    > Mix the sugar with the flour. Pour in the boiling water and add salt.
    > Cook in a saucepan, stirring frequently for about 8 minutes. If it
    > seems too thick, add a touch more boiling water. Remove from the range
    > and stir in butter, cream and vanilla.
    >
    > 1 beaten egg
    > 1/4 c. butter or oleo
    > 1/4 c. water
    > 2/3 c. brown sugar
    > 1/3 c. white corn syrup
    >
    > Cook until thick, stirring frequently.
    >
    > 1 1/4 c. sugar
    > 3/4 c. corn syrup
    > 1 tbsp. butter
    > 1/2 pt. thin cream
    > 1/2 tsp. salt
    >
    > Mix. Cook to softball stage (234 degrees on candy thermometer).
    > Serve over ice cream or dessert.
    >
    >
    > 1 tbsp. cornstarch
    > 1 1/4 c. light brown sugar
    > 1/2 c. half & half
    > 2 tbsp. light corn syrup
    > 1/8 tsp. salt
    > 1/4 c. butter
    > 1 tsp. vanilla
    >
    > In 1 1/2 quart glass bowl, stir together cornstarch and brown sugar.
    > Stir in half & half, corn syrup, and salt. Add butter. Cover and
    > microwave at high 3 1/2 to 4 1/2 minutes, stirring after 2 minutes to
    > smooth and thicken and sugar is dissolved. Add vanilla and stir again
    > to blend. Serve warm or cold. Store in refrigerator and reheat as
    > necessary. *Great served warm over pound cake and banana slices or
    > crepe filled with sliced bananas.
    >
    >
    > 2/3 c. corn syrup
    > 1 c. light brown sugar
    > 1/4 c. BUTTER
    > 2/3 c. evaporated milk or cream
    >
    > Boil together corn syrup, brown sugar and butter until consistency of
    > heavy syrup. Cool slightly. Add milk. Makes 1 pint.


  4. #4
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce


    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >A few! I wonder which of these is "chewy"--which is what caught my eye.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.



    Chewy/texture is a function of the temperature when cooking sugar.

    Take your pick of the textures listed below.

    If Wayne doesn't know this HE SHOULD.

    Dimitri



    SYRUP BOILING POINT - CANDY THERMOMETER: Read at eye level. Must be dry and
    clean when putting into the candy pot EACH TIME.

    CONFECTIONCOLD WATER TEST: I only recommend the Cold Water Test for advanced
    candy-makers. Density or concentration of sugar to water is measured when a
    small amount (1/2 to 1 teaspoon) of syrup is dropped from a clean spoon into
    a small bowl of very cold water (not ice cold) and then quickly examined or
    carefully picked up. The firmness indicates temperature of syrup. As the
    water heats and evaporates, the concentration of sugar in the syrup rises;
    the higher the concentration of sugar, the harder the mixture will be upon
    cooling.
    Stir over heat until dissolvedImbibing cake layers.Simple sugar syrup
    212 degrees F WaterBoils at 212 degrees F at sea level.

    Thread Stage
    215° F-235° F
    /108° C-118° C
    sugar concentration: 80%Syrup, fruit liqueur and some icingsThread: At this
    relatively low temperature, there is still a lot of water left in the syrup.
    The liquid sugar may be pulled into brittle threads between the fingers. Or,
    take a small amount of the syrup onto a spoon, and drop it from about
    2-inches above the pot. Let it drip into the pan. If it spins a long thread,
    like a spider web, it's done.
    Jelly, candy, fruit liqueur making and some icingsPearl: 220 - 222 degrees
    F - The thread formed by pulling the liquid sugar may be stretched. When a
    cool metal spoon is dipped into the syrup and then raised, the syrup runs
    off in drops which merge to form a sheet.

    Delicate sugar candy and syrupBlow or Soufflé: 230 - 235 degrees F - Boiling
    sugar creates small bubbles resembling snowflakes. The syrup spins a 2-
    inch thread when dropped from a spoon.

    Soft-Ball Stage
    235° F-240° F
    /118° C-120° C
    sugar concentration: 85%Fudge,
    Fondant, pralines, pâte â bombe or Italian meringue, peppermint creams and
    classic buttercreamsSoft ball: A small amount of syrup dropped into chilled
    water forms a soft, flexible ball, but flattens like a pancake after a few
    moments in your hand.


    Firm-Ball Stage
    245° F-250° F
    /123° C-125° C
    sugar concentration: 87%Caramel candiesFirm ball: Forms a firm ball that
    will not flatten when removed from water, but remains malleable and will
    flatten when squeezed.

    Hard-Ball Stage
    250° F-265° F
    /125° C-133° C
    sugar concentration: 92%Nougat, marshmallows, gummies, divinity, and rock
    candy Hard ball: At this stage, the syrup will form thick, "ropy" threads as
    it drips from the spoon. The sugar concentration is rather high now, which
    means there's less and less moisture in the sugar syrup. Syrup dropped into
    ice water may be formed into a hard ball which holds its shape on removal.
    The ball will be hard, but you can still change its shape by squashing it.

    Soft-Crack Stage
    270° F-290° F
    /135° C-145° C
    sugar concentration: 95%Taffy Soft Crack: As the syrup reached soft-crack
    stage, the bubbles on top will become smaller, thicker, and closer together.
    At this stage, the moisture content is low. Syrup dropped into ice water
    separates into hard but pliable threads. They will bend slightly before
    breaking.

    Hard-Crack Stage
    300° F-310° F
    /150° C-155° C
    sugar concentration: 99%Butterscotch, brittlesHard Crack: The hard-crack
    stage is the highest temperature you are likely to see specified in a candy
    recipe. At these temperatures, there is almost no water left in the syrup.
    Syrup dropped into ice water separates into hard, brittle threads that break
    when bent.

    Hard-Crack Stage
    320° F-335° F
    /160° C-168° CHard candies, toffee


  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> A few! I wonder which of these is "chewy"--which is what caught my eye.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    >
    > Chewy/texture is a function of the temperature when cooking sugar.
    >
    > Take your pick of the textures listed below.
    >
    > If Wayne doesn't know this HE SHOULD.
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    >
    >
    > SYRUP BOILING POINT - CANDY THERMOMETER: Read at eye level. Must be dry
    > and clean when putting into the candy pot EACH TIME.
    >
    > CONFECTIONCOLD WATER TEST: I only recommend the Cold Water Test for
    > advanced candy-makers. Density or concentration of sugar to water is
    > measured when a small amount (1/2 to 1 teaspoon) of syrup is dropped
    > from a clean spoon into a small bowl of very cold water (not ice cold)
    > and then quickly examined or carefully picked up. The firmness indicates
    > temperature of syrup. As the water heats and evaporates, the
    > concentration of sugar in the syrup rises; the higher the concentration
    > of sugar, the harder the mixture will be upon cooling.
    > Stir over heat until dissolvedImbibing cake layers.Simple sugar syrup
    > 212 degrees F WaterBoils at 212 degrees F at sea level.
    >
    > Thread Stage
    > 215° F-235° F
    > /108° C-118° C
    > sugar concentration: 80%Syrup, fruit liqueur and some icingsThread: At
    > this relatively low temperature, there is still a lot of water left in
    > the syrup. The liquid sugar may be pulled into brittle threads between
    > the fingers. Or, take a small amount of the syrup onto a spoon, and drop
    > it from about 2-inches above the pot. Let it drip into the pan. If it
    > spins a long thread, like a spider web, it's done.
    > Jelly, candy, fruit liqueur making and some icingsPearl: 220 - 222
    > degrees F - The thread formed by pulling the liquid sugar may be
    > stretched. When a cool metal spoon is dipped into the syrup and then
    > raised, the syrup runs off in drops which merge to form a sheet.
    >
    > Delicate sugar candy and syrupBlow or Soufflé: 230 - 235 degrees F -
    > Boiling sugar creates small bubbles resembling snowflakes. The syrup
    > spins a 2-
    > inch thread when dropped from a spoon.
    >
    > Soft-Ball Stage
    > 235° F-240° F
    > /118° C-120° C
    > sugar concentration: 85%Fudge,
    > Fondant, pralines, pâte â bombe or Italian meringue, peppermint creams
    > and classic buttercreamsSoft ball: A small amount of syrup dropped into
    > chilled water forms a soft, flexible ball, but flattens like a pancake
    > after a few moments in your hand.
    >
    >
    > Firm-Ball Stage
    > 245° F-250° F
    > /123° C-125° C
    > sugar concentration: 87%Caramel candiesFirm ball: Forms a firm ball that
    > will not flatten when removed from water, but remains malleable and will
    > flatten when squeezed.
    >
    > Hard-Ball Stage
    > 250° F-265° F
    > /125° C-133° C
    > sugar concentration: 92%Nougat, marshmallows, gummies, divinity, and
    > rock candy Hard ball: At this stage, the syrup will form thick, "ropy"
    > threads as it drips from the spoon. The sugar concentration is rather
    > high now, which means there's less and less moisture in the sugar syrup.
    > Syrup dropped into ice water may be formed into a hard ball which holds
    > its shape on removal. The ball will be hard, but you can still change
    > its shape by squashing it.
    >
    > Soft-Crack Stage
    > 270° F-290° F
    > /135° C-145° C
    > sugar concentration: 95%Taffy Soft Crack: As the syrup reached
    > soft-crack stage, the bubbles on top will become smaller, thicker, and
    > closer together. At this stage, the moisture content is low. Syrup
    > dropped into ice water separates into hard but pliable threads. They
    > will bend slightly before breaking.
    >
    > Hard-Crack Stage
    > 300° F-310° F
    > /150° C-155° C
    > sugar concentration: 99%Butterscotch, brittlesHard Crack: The hard-crack
    > stage is the highest temperature you are likely to see specified in a
    > candy recipe. At these temperatures, there is almost no water left in
    > the syrup. Syrup dropped into ice water separates into hard, brittle
    > threads that break when bent.
    >
    > Hard-Crack Stage
    > 320° F-335° F
    > /160° C-168° CHard candies, toffee


    Ah. Not being into such, although I have, of course, run into
    reference to same many times, I thought the ingredients might have
    some bearing on the texture.

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce


    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Dimitri wrote:


    <reference snipped>

    >
    > Ah. Not being into such, although I have, of course, run into reference
    > to same many times, I thought the ingredients might have some bearing on
    > the texture.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    No problem

    Since the vast majority of the finished product is sugar - remember in the
    cooking process you are removing much of the moisture - the final product is
    going to be mostly sugar.

    It is the water within the initial ingredients that prevents the sugar from
    changing temperature. As long as there is a viable amount of water present
    the temperature at (sea level) will not exceed 212 degrees.

    Dimitri


  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce

    Dimitri wrote:
    >
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Dimitri wrote:

    >
    > <reference snipped>
    >
    >>
    >> Ah. Not being into such, although I have, of course, run into
    >> reference to same many times, I thought the ingredients might have
    >> some bearing on the texture.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > No problem
    >
    > Since the vast majority of the finished product is sugar - remember in
    > the cooking process you are removing much of the moisture - the final
    > product is going to be mostly sugar.
    >
    > It is the water within the initial ingredients that prevents the sugar
    > from changing temperature. As long as there is a viable amount of water
    > present the temperature at (sea level) will not exceed 212 degrees.
    >
    > Dimitri


    I might just have to experiment. (Someone please stop me!)

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: Old-Fashioned "Chewy" Butterscotch Sauce

    Jean B. wrote:
    > Dimitri wrote:
    >>
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> Dimitri wrote:

    >>
    >> <reference snipped>
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Ah. Not being into such, although I have, of course, run into
    >>> reference to same many times, I thought the ingredients might have
    >>> some bearing on the texture.
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Jean B.

    >>
    >> No problem
    >>
    >> Since the vast majority of the finished product is sugar - remember in
    >> the cooking process you are removing much of the moisture - the final
    >> product is going to be mostly sugar.
    >>
    >> It is the water within the initial ingredients that prevents the sugar
    >> from changing temperature. As long as there is a viable amount of
    >> water present the temperature at (sea level) will not exceed 212 degrees.
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > I might just have to experiment. (Someone please stop me!)


    Hehehe!




Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32