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Thread: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

  1. #1
    koko Guest

    Default REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos


    Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    sauce.

    This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.

    The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.

    http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg

    First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the sauce.
    Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white peppercorns, sugar,
    water and fish sauce.
    http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg

    Chop the garlic and just one inch of the cilantro stems, not the
    leaves.
    http://i45.tinypic.com/bzd5h.jpg

    I used my Molcajete but a mini food processor would be quicker and
    easier.
    I just love using it, weird I know.
    http://i47.tinypic.com/30ni2h5.jpg

    All mooshed up into a paste.
    http://i45.tinypic.com/29d7n7l.jpg

    Now make the sauce.
    Add water to the sugar in a small bowl, then the fish sauce.
    Make sure the sugar is dissolved.
    http://i50.tinypic.com/wtwroj.jpg

    Set the paste and sauce aside.

    Cut one pound of boneless pork loin or pork chops into thin strips.
    Have the paste, sauce, oil and pepper ready.
    http://i45.tinypic.com/ru1grl.jpg

    Heat up the wok and add the oil. Swirl the oil around in the pan.
    Cook the garlic, cilantro paste in the oil until lightly browned.
    http://i46.tinypic.com/osz681.jpg

    Add the pork strips to the cooked paste. Cook until the pork is no
    longer pink.
    http://i48.tinypic.com/szd012.jpg

    Add the white pepper and cook one minute more.
    Add the sauce then simmer to thicken the sauce.
    http://i49.tinypic.com/mjwcp4.jpg

    Serve on lettuce leaves with rice.
    http://i45.tinypic.com/2ilei54.jpg


    I put a little meat and some rice in a lettuce leaf and ate it that
    way. Don't know if that was the proper way to do it or not, but dang,
    was it good.

    This is full flavored, there's nothing wimpy about this dish. I love
    it and can't wait to eat the leftovers tomorrow.


    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) Serves 4 To 6

    ethnic, meats

    1 pound bones pork chops or pork loin
    1/2 cup (1/4 lb) finely chopped garlic
    1/4 cup finely chopped coriander root (thai; pak chii) (or bottom 1'
    fresh cilantro)
    2 tbs fish sauce (nam pla)
    1 tbs granulated sugar
    1/4 cup water
    3 tbs vegetable oil
    1 tbs ground white pepper
    red lettuce leaves

    .. Slice pork across the grain into 1 to 2' strips, not more than 1/8'
    thick and set aside. Pound the garlic and coriander root in a mortar
    to a smooth paste.

    2. Combine the fish sauce, sugar and water in a small bowl and stir
    'til the sugar's dissolved. Set aside.

    3. Heat a wok, add oil, swirl to cover. Add the paste from Step 1 and
    stir-fry 'til lightly golden.

    4. Add the pork and stir-fry 'til the pink color disappears.

    5. Add the white pepper and stir-fry about 1 minute. Don't let it
    burn.

    6. Add the liquid from Step 2 and stir over moderate heat until the
    sauce begins to thicken and any stuck portions are loosened, about 1
    minute. Add more water if it gets too dry. There should be about 1/2
    cup of sauce.

    Serve over lettuce leaves, with rice.

    --
    Nick.~Semper Fi~

    Notes: Nick on abf


    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.84 **

    And that's that.

    koko

    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/16/10

  2. #2
    Pits09 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    Koko -Fantastic thanks for posting this
    have just dug some pork out of the freezer
    Have fresh Cilantro growing but will
    swap the SWEET fish sauce for the normal salty one and add soem grated
    lime rind and lime juice

    great recipe is now a keeper thanks



    On Jan 18, 12:26*pm, koko <k...@letscook.com> wrote:
    > Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    > Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    > sauce.
    >
    > This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >
    > The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >
    > http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >
    > First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the sauce.
    > Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white peppercorns, sugar,
    > water and fish sauce.http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg
    >
    > Chop the garlic and just one inch of the cilantro stems, not the
    > leaves.http://i45.tinypic.com/bzd5h.jpg
    >
    > I used my Molcajete but a mini food processor would be quicker and
    > easier.
    > I just love using it, weird I know.http://i47.tinypic.com/30ni2h5.jpg
    >
    > All mooshed up into a paste.http://i45.tinypic.com/29d7n7l.jpg
    >
    > Now make the sauce.
    > Add water to the sugar in a small bowl, then the fish sauce.
    > Make sure the sugar is dissolved.http://i50.tinypic.com/wtwroj.jpg
    >
    > Set the paste and sauce aside.
    >
    > Cut one pound of boneless pork loin or pork chops into thin strips.
    > Have the paste, sauce, oil and pepper ready.http://i45.tinypic.com/ru1grl..jpg
    >
    > Heat up the wok and add the oil. Swirl the oil around in the pan.
    > Cook the garlic, cilantro paste in the oil until lightly browned.http://i46.tinypic.com/osz681.jpg
    >
    > Add the pork strips to the cooked paste. Cook until the pork is no
    > longer pink.http://i48.tinypic.com/szd012.jpg
    >
    > Add the white pepper and cook one minute more.
    > Add the sauce then simmer to thicken the sauce.http://i49.tinypic.com/mjwcp4.jpg
    >
    > Serve on lettuce leaves with rice.http://i45.tinypic.com/2ilei54.jpg
    >
    > I put a little meat and some rice in a lettuce leaf and ate it that
    > way. Don't know if that was the proper way to do it or not, but dang,
    > was it good.
    >
    > This is full flavored, there's nothing wimpy about this dish. I love
    > it and can't wait to eat the leftovers tomorrow.
    >
    > @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
    >
    > Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) Serves 4 To 6
    >
    > ethnic, meats
    >
    > 1 pound bones pork chops or pork loin
    > 1/2 cup (1/4 lb) finely chopped garlic
    > 1/4 cup finely chopped coriander root (thai; pak chii) (or bottom 1'
    > * fresh cilantro)
    > 2 tbs fish sauce (nam pla)
    > 1 tbs granulated sugar
    > 1/4 cup water
    > 3 tbs vegetable oil
    > 1 tbs ground white pepper
    > * red lettuce leaves
    >
    > . Slice pork across the grain into 1 to 2' strips, not more than 1/8'
    > thick and set aside. Pound the garlic and coriander root in a mortar
    > to a smooth paste.
    >
    > 2. Combine the fish sauce, sugar and water in a small bowl and stir
    > 'til the sugar's dissolved. Set aside.
    >
    > 3. Heat a wok, add oil, swirl to cover. Add the paste from Step 1 and
    > stir-fry 'til lightly golden.
    >
    > 4. Add the pork and stir-fry 'til the pink color disappears.
    >
    > 5. Add the white pepper and stir-fry about 1 minute. Don't let it
    > burn.
    >
    > 6. Add the liquid from Step 2 and stir over moderate heat until the
    > sauce begins to thicken and any stuck portions are loosened, about 1
    > minute. Add more water if it gets too dry. There should be about 1/2
    > cup of sauce.
    >
    > Serve over lettuce leaves, with rice.
    >
    > --
    > Nick.~Semper Fi~ *
    >
    > Notes: *Nick on abf
    >
    > ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.84 **
    >
    > And that's that.
    >
    > koko
    >
    > --
    >
    > There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *George Bernard Shawwww.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    > updated 01/16/10



  3. #3
    koko Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Sun, 17 Jan 2010 22:58:53 -0800 (PST), Pits09
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >On Jan 18, 12:26*pm, koko <k...@letscook.com> wrote:
    >> Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    >> Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    >> sauce.



    >Koko -Fantastic thanks for posting this
    >have just dug some pork out of the freezer
    >Have fresh Cilantro growing but will
    >swap the SWEET fish sauce for the normal salty one and add soem grated
    >lime rind and lime juice
    >
    >great recipe is now a keeper thanks


    I'm so happy you are going to try it.
    The reason I called the fish sauce sweet is because some sugar was in
    it but it was still plenty salty. Perhaps I used the wrong terminology
    it's not sweet like a Mae Ploy sauce.
    Dang Pits, adding some lime sounds like a great idea, I'll do that
    when I have the leftovers for lunch today.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/17/10

  4. #4
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    koko wrote:
    > Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    > Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    > sauce.
    >
    > This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.


    Sounds delicious. And I think I've got a pork tenderloin lurking in the
    freezer. Thanks!




  5. #5
    Janet Guest

    Default Re: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    koko, how crucial is it to use white pepper instead of black? And if one
    were going to make a substitution, would it be the same amount? And what
    type of white pepper is typical--szechuan, or something else?




  6. #6
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Wed, 20 Jan 2010 11:17:10 -0500, "Janet" <boxhill@maine.rr.[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >koko, how crucial is it to use white pepper instead of black? And if one
    >were going to make a substitution, would it be the same amount? And what
    >type of white pepper is typical--szechuan, or something else?
    >
    >

    Not sure about that Janet. I used Sarawak White that I bought through
    Penzeys Spices.
    From what I've read white pepper is preferred in Asian cooking.
    I'll ask Nick on abf who I got the recipe from. I'm pretty sure I'll
    get an answer tonight so stay tuned.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/17/10

  7. #7
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Wed, 20 Jan 2010 17:28:38 -0800, koko <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Not sure about that Janet. I used Sarawak White that I bought through
    >Penzeys Spices.
    >From what I've read white pepper is preferred in Asian cooking.
    >I'll ask Nick on abf who I got the recipe from. I'm pretty sure I'll
    >get an answer tonight so stay tuned.
    >
    >koko


    Julia Child also preferred white pepper...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    PeterL1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    Hmmmmmmmmmmmm :-/

    I posted this on the 19th, and for some reason, it didn't go through :-/
    Seems to be an on again/off again problem with 'Bigpong'.



    From: PeterL1 <[email protected]>
    Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 14:09:37 GMT
    NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 01:09:37 EST


    koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:3ko7l59s8iuu5q5rgucasookj2om8mhvut@
    4ax.com:

    >
    > Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    > Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    > sauce.
    >
    > This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >
    > The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >
    > http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >
    > First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the sauce.
    > Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white peppercorns, sugar,
    > water and fish sauce.
    > http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg



    Hmmmmmm, Sarawak White Pepper. Does it actually come from Sarawak?


    >
    > Chop the garlic and just one inch of the cilantro stems, not the
    > leaves.
    > http://i45.tinypic.com/bzd5h.jpg
    >
    > I used my Molcajete but a mini food processor would be quicker and
    > easier.
    > I just love using it, weird I know.
    > http://i47.tinypic.com/30ni2h5.jpg
    >
    > All mooshed up into a paste.
    > http://i45.tinypic.com/29d7n7l.jpg



    Love the look of that mortar and pestle..... looks like it came straight
    of the sacrificial alter of some Inca tribe!! :-)


    >
    > Now make the sauce.
    > Add water to the sugar in a small bowl, then the fish sauce.
    > Make sure the sugar is dissolved.
    > http://i50.tinypic.com/wtwroj.jpg



    As an aside......... the ring on your thumb....... is there any special
    significance??

    Been meaning to ask you for ages.


    >
    > Set the paste and sauce aside.
    >
    > Cut one pound of boneless pork loin or pork chops into thin strips.
    > Have the paste, sauce, oil and pepper ready.
    > http://i45.tinypic.com/ru1grl.jpg



    All the soldiers lined up, ready to go...... :-)



    >
    > Heat up the wok and add the oil. Swirl the oil around in the pan.
    > Cook the garlic, cilantro paste in the oil until lightly browned.
    > http://i46.tinypic.com/osz681.jpg
    >
    > Add the pork strips to the cooked paste. Cook until the pork is no
    > longer pink.
    > http://i48.tinypic.com/szd012.jpg
    >
    > Add the white pepper and cook one minute more.
    > Add the sauce then simmer to thicken the sauce.
    > http://i49.tinypic.com/mjwcp4.jpg
    >
    > Serve on lettuce leaves with rice.
    > http://i45.tinypic.com/2ilei54.jpg
    >
    >
    > I put a little meat and some rice in a lettuce leaf and ate it that
    > way. Don't know if that was the proper way to do it or not, but dang,
    > was it good.
    >
    > This is full flavored, there's nothing wimpy about this dish. I love
    > it and can't wait to eat the leftovers tomorrow.
    >



    Hmmmmmmmmmmm, might have to give it a whirl and see what you're talking
    about :-)

    Excellent series K4.... as per usual :-)



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    Killfile all Google Groups posters.........

    http://improve-usenet.org/

    http://improve-usenet.org/filters_bg.html

  9. #9
    koko Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Thu, 21 Jan 2010 01:49:34 GMT, PeterL1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hmmmmmmmmmmmm :-/
    >
    >I posted this on the 19th, and for some reason, it didn't go through :-/
    >Seems to be an on again/off again problem with 'Bigpong'.
    >
    >
    >
    >From: PeterL1 <[email protected]>
    >Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 14:09:37 GMT
    >NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 01:09:37 EST
    >
    >
    >koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:3ko7l59s8iuu5q5rgucasookj2om8mhvut@
    >4ax.com:
    >
    >>
    >> Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    >> Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    >> sauce.
    >>
    >> This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >>
    >> The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >>
    >> http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >>
    >> First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the sauce.
    >> Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white peppercorns, sugar,
    >> water and fish sauce.
    >> http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg

    >
    >
    >Hmmmmmm, Sarawak White Pepper. Does it actually come from Sarawak?


    Hmmmmmmm, I didn't realize Sarawak was a place, I always thought it
    was a way of processing the peppercorns. Hmmmm learn something new
    everyday.

    >> Chop the garlic and just one inch of the cilantro stems, not the
    >> leaves.
    >> http://i45.tinypic.com/bzd5h.jpg
    >>
    >> I used my Molcajete but a mini food processor would be quicker and
    >> easier.
    >> I just love using it, weird I know.
    >> http://i47.tinypic.com/30ni2h5.jpg
    >>
    >> All mooshed up into a paste.
    >> http://i45.tinypic.com/29d7n7l.jpg

    >
    >
    >Love the look of that mortar and pestle..... looks like it came straight
    >of the sacrificial alter of some Inca tribe!! :-)


    Thanks, it's my favorite one.

    >> Now make the sauce.
    >> Add water to the sugar in a small bowl, then the fish sauce.
    >> Make sure the sugar is dissolved.
    >> http://i50.tinypic.com/wtwroj.jpg

    >
    >
    >As an aside......... the ring on your thumb....... is there any special
    >significance??
    >
    >Been meaning to ask you for ages.


    Nope, no special significance.
    >>
    >> Set the paste and sauce aside.
    >>
    >> Cut one pound of boneless pork loin or pork chops into thin strips.
    >> Have the paste, sauce, oil and pepper ready.
    >> http://i45.tinypic.com/ru1grl.jpg

    >
    >
    >All the soldiers lined up, ready to go...... :-)
    >

    I have to have my Mise en Place. I hate it when I realize I don't have
    enough of an ingredient or forget to add it at all.
    >>
    >> Heat up the wok and add the oil. Swirl the oil around in the pan.
    >> Cook the garlic, cilantro paste in the oil until lightly browned.
    >> http://i46.tinypic.com/osz681.jpg
    >>
    >> Add the pork strips to the cooked paste. Cook until the pork is no
    >> longer pink.
    >> http://i48.tinypic.com/szd012.jpg
    >>
    >> Add the white pepper and cook one minute more.
    >> Add the sauce then simmer to thicken the sauce.
    >> http://i49.tinypic.com/mjwcp4.jpg
    >>
    >> Serve on lettuce leaves with rice.
    >> http://i45.tinypic.com/2ilei54.jpg
    >>
    >>
    >> I put a little meat and some rice in a lettuce leaf and ate it that
    >> way. Don't know if that was the proper way to do it or not, but dang,
    >> was it good.
    >>
    >> This is full flavored, there's nothing wimpy about this dish. I love
    >> it and can't wait to eat the leftovers tomorrow.
    >>

    >
    >
    >Hmmmmmmmmmmm, might have to give it a whirl and see what you're talking
    >about :-)
    >
    >Excellent series K4.... as per usual :-)


    Thank you. It was great fun and was delicious.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/17/10

  10. #10
    koko Guest

    Default Re: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Wed, 20 Jan 2010 11:17:10 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >koko, how crucial is it to use white pepper instead of black? And if one
    >were going to make a substitution, would it be the same amount? And what
    >type of white pepper is typical--szechuan, or something else?
    >
    >

    I got this reply from Nick.

    "The white peppercorns you used are perfect. It's also perfect for Cao
    Tom (rice soup). It has a brighter flavor and opens up your nasal
    passages more than black pepper. Black pepper is also used in many
    recipes. If you substitute one for the other, the taste will not be
    the same, but better than substituting ginger for galanga!

    Szechwan pepper is native to the Szechwan province of China. Though
    they bear some resemblance to black peppercorns, they are not actually
    of the pepper family, but the dried seed husks of the berry of a tree
    of the rue family. I don't find them in any of my Thai recipes or
    books."

    Hope that helps. Like he said you can substitue one for the other but
    the taste will not be the same.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/17/10

  11. #11
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Wed, 20 Jan 2010 21:04:23 -0800, koko wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Jan 2010 11:17:10 -0500, "Janet" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>koko, how crucial is it to use white pepper instead of black? And if one
    >>were going to make a substitution, would it be the same amount? And what
    >>type of white pepper is typical--szechuan, or something else?
    >>
    >>

    > I got this reply from Nick.
    >
    > "The white peppercorns you used are perfect. It's also perfect for Cao
    > Tom (rice soup). It has a brighter flavor and opens up your nasal
    > passages more than black pepper. Black pepper is also used in many
    > recipes. If you substitute one for the other, the taste will not be
    > the same, but better than substituting ginger for galanga!
    >
    > Szechwan pepper is native to the Szechwan province of China. Though
    > they bear some resemblance to black peppercorns, they are not actually
    > of the pepper family, but the dried seed husks of the berry of a tree
    > of the rue family. I don't find them in any of my Thai recipes or
    > books."
    >
    > Hope that helps. Like he said you can substitue one for the other but
    > the taste will not be the same.
    >
    > koko


    i was going to say, szechuan pepper would be barking up the wrong plant
    entirely. wikipedia has a run-down here:

    <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sichuan_pepper>

    it's not so much hot as causing a certain numbness in the mouth, which
    sounds kinda bizarre, but in reality is quite appealing and adds to the
    'manifold flavor' effect of good szechuan chow.

    if you should want to fool with it, penzeys has the freshest i've ever
    encountered. it's many time more expensive than the bulk packages in the
    asian stores, but you typically use it 1/4 teaspoon (or at most 1/2 t.) at
    a time, so it lasts a while.

    your pal,
    blake

  12. #12
    PeterL1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:iahfl51gtrec1d0iatcih659ibs7lpv3c5@
    4ax.com:

    > On Thu, 21 Jan 2010 01:49:34 GMT, PeterL1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Hmmmmmmmmmmmm :-/
    >>
    >>I posted this on the 19th, and for some reason, it didn't go through :-/
    >>Seems to be an on again/off again problem with 'Bigpong'.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>From: PeterL1 <[email protected]>
    >>Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 14:09:37 GMT
    >>NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 01:09:37 EST
    >>
    >>
    >>koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:3ko7l59s8iuu5q5rgucasookj2om8mhvut@
    >>4ax.com:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    >>> Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    >>> sauce.
    >>>
    >>> This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >>>
    >>> The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >>>
    >>> http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >>>
    >>> First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the sauce.
    >>> Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white peppercorns, sugar,
    >>> water and fish sauce.
    >>> http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg

    >>
    >>
    >>Hmmmmmm, Sarawak White Pepper. Does it actually come from Sarawak?

    >
    > Hmmmmmmm, I didn't realize Sarawak was a place, I always thought it
    > was a way of processing the peppercorns.



    I spent of a bit of time in the region :-)

    Didn't know they grew pepper there though!!


    > Hmmmm learn something new
    > everyday.



    For your further edification.......... :-)


    http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...ppercorns.html


    "White peppercorns start out the same as black peppercorns, but then are
    allowed to ripen more fully on the vine. The black outer shell is then
    removed in one of two ways: the Muntok peppercorns are soaked in water until
    the black shell loosens, while the Sarawak peppercorns are held under a
    constantly flowing stream of Artesian spring water, yielding a whiter color,
    and an extra clean product. Both white peppercorns have a traditional rich,
    winey, somewhat hot flavor that is nice used in soup, on grilled meat or
    poultry, in light-colored dishes, or mixed with black peppercorns for a
    broader range of flavor. Preferred for cooking the foods of Southeast Asia,
    and Southern and Eastern Europe."


    And it appears that 'Sarawak White' is a rather high quality product.

    http://www.salttraders.com/Detail.bok?no=30


    http://www.spicelines.com/2007/05/a_...e_pepperco.htm

    "Sarawak white peppercorns: Long considered the ne plus ultra of white
    pepper. Very clean, creamy colored peppercorns from Malaysian Borneo,
    cultivated in small mountain plots by members of the Bidayuh tribe. Pepper
    berries are hand plucked when ripe and washed in cool running spring water
    for up to two weeks. After drying, they are sorted to remove any dark-colored
    corns and lab-tested for microbes before receiving the top government
    designation, “Sarawak Cream Label."

    Sarawak white peppercorns have a musky or woody aroma, a hot flavor and a
    slight piney or balsamic after taste. It is the pepper to use for a quick
    shot of heat in pale soups or sauces where black flecks are not desired; it
    is also good for simply adding heat to a dish without also adding the more
    distinctive flavor of black peppercorns. White pepper blends well with ginger
    and dark chocolate, and adds zest to fruit compotes and other sweet spicy
    desserts."

    There you go..... you're now officially a lover of the finer things in life,
    and you didn't even know it ;-P



    >>>
    >>> All mooshed up into a paste.
    >>> http://i45.tinypic.com/29d7n7l.jpg

    >>
    >>
    >>Love the look of that mortar and pestle..... looks like it came straight
    >>of the sacrificial alter of some Inca tribe!! :-)

    >
    > Thanks, it's my favorite one.



    So it *is* off the sacrificial altar!!



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    Killfile all Google Groups posters.........

    http://improve-usenet.org/

    http://improve-usenet.org/filters_bg.html

  13. #13
    koko Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 02:14:21 GMT, PeterL1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:iahfl51gtrec1d0iatcih659ibs7lpv3c5@
    >4ax.com:
    >
    >> On Thu, 21 Jan 2010 01:49:34 GMT, PeterL1
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Hmmmmmmmmmmmm :-/
    >>>
    >>>I posted this on the 19th, and for some reason, it didn't go through :-/
    >>>Seems to be an on again/off again problem with 'Bigpong'.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>From: PeterL1 <[email protected]>
    >>>Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >>>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 14:09:37 GMT
    >>>NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 01:09:37 EST
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:3ko7l59s8iuu5q5rgucasookj2om8mhvut@
    >>>4ax.com:
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    >>>> Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet fish
    >>>> sauce.
    >>>>
    >>>> This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >>>>
    >>>> The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >>>>
    >>>> http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the sauce.
    >>>> Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white peppercorns, sugar,
    >>>> water and fish sauce.
    >>>> http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Hmmmmmm, Sarawak White Pepper. Does it actually come from Sarawak?

    >>
    >> Hmmmmmmm, I didn't realize Sarawak was a place, I always thought it
    >> was a way of processing the peppercorns.

    >
    >
    >I spent of a bit of time in the region :-)


    And that would be where? I'm embarrassed to admit I'm geographically
    challenged.
    >
    >Didn't know they grew pepper there though!!


    >> Hmmmm learn something new
    >> everyday.

    >
    >
    >For your further edification.......... :-)
    >
    >
    >http://www.penzeys.com/cgi-bin/penze...ppercorns.html
    >
    >
    >"White peppercorns start out the same as black peppercorns, but then are
    >allowed to ripen more fully on the vine. The black outer shell is then
    >removed in one of two ways: the Muntok peppercorns are soaked in water until
    >the black shell loosens, while the Sarawak peppercorns are held under a
    >constantly flowing stream of Artesian spring water, yielding a whiter color,
    >and an extra clean product. Both white peppercorns have a traditional rich,
    >winey, somewhat hot flavor that is nice used in soup, on grilled meat or
    >poultry, in light-colored dishes, or mixed with black peppercorns for a
    >broader range of flavor. Preferred for cooking the foods of Southeast Asia,
    >and Southern and Eastern Europe."
    >
    >
    >And it appears that 'Sarawak White' is a rather high quality product.
    >
    >http://www.salttraders.com/Detail.bok?no=30
    >
    >
    >http://www.spicelines.com/2007/05/a_...e_pepperco.htm
    >
    >"Sarawak white peppercorns: Long considered the ne plus ultra of white
    >pepper. Very clean, creamy colored peppercorns from Malaysian Borneo,
    >cultivated in small mountain plots by members of the Bidayuh tribe. Pepper
    >berries are hand plucked when ripe and washed in cool running spring water
    >for up to two weeks. After drying, they are sorted to remove any dark-colored
    >corns and lab-tested for microbes before receiving the top government
    >designation, “Sarawak Cream Label."
    >
    >Sarawak white peppercorns have a musky or woody aroma, a hot flavor and a
    >slight piney or balsamic after taste. It is the pepper to use for a quick
    >shot of heat in pale soups or sauces where black flecks are not desired; it
    >is also good for simply adding heat to a dish without also adding the more
    >distinctive flavor of black peppercorns. White pepper blends well with ginger
    >and dark chocolate, and adds zest to fruit compotes and other sweet spicy
    >desserts."
    >
    >There you go..... you're now officially a lover of the finer things in life,
    >and you didn't even know it ;-P
    >

    Well, I did know it. Penzeys is who I order my Sarawak peppercorns
    from.
    It's not that I'm unfamiliar with their processing or flavor, it's
    that I wasn't aware that Sarawak was a place.
    >
    >>>>
    >>>> All mooshed up into a paste.
    >>>> http://i45.tinypic.com/29d7n7l.jpg
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Love the look of that mortar and pestle..... looks like it came straight
    >>>of the sacrificial alter of some Inca tribe!! :-)

    >>
    >> Thanks, it's my favorite one.

    >
    >So it *is* off the sacrificial altar!!


    Thank you so much for your help and information.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/17/10

  14. #14
    PeterL2 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    koko <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 02:14:21 GMT, PeterL1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>koko <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>news:iahfl51gtrec1d0iatcih659ibs7lpv3c5@ 4ax.com:
    >>
    >>> On Thu, 21 Jan 2010 01:49:34 GMT, PeterL1
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>Hmmmmmmmmmmmm :-/
    >>>>
    >>>>I posted this on the 19th, and for some reason, it didn't go through
    >>>>:-/ Seems to be an on again/off again problem with 'Bigpong'.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>From: PeterL1 <[email protected]>
    >>>>Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >>>>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 14:09:37 GMT
    >>>>NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 01:09:37 EST
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>koko <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>>news:3ko7l59s8iuu5q5rgucasookj2om8mhvut@ 4ax.com:
    >>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    >>>>> Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet
    >>>>> fish sauce.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >>>>>
    >>>>> First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the
    >>>>> sauce. Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white
    >>>>> peppercorns, sugar, water and fish sauce.
    >>>>> http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>Hmmmmmm, Sarawak White Pepper. Does it actually come from Sarawak?
    >>>
    >>> Hmmmmmmm, I didn't realize Sarawak was a place, I always thought it
    >>> was a way of processing the peppercorns.

    >>
    >>
    >>I spent of a bit of time in the region :-)

    >
    > And that would be where? I'm embarrassed to admit I'm geographically
    > challenged.
    >>



    It's a Malaysian State on the Island of Borneo.

    http://www.airbornetravelkk.com/publ...ges/my_map.gif


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarawak


    There's also a couple of large Orangutan Sanctuary's there. We'll be doing
    a "volunteer holiday" to one of them in the next few years.

    http://www.volunteerabroad.com/listi.../listing/60315

  15. #15
    koko Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 04:57:59 GMT, PeterL2 <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >koko <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected] :
    >
    >> On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 02:14:21 GMT, PeterL1
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>koko <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>news:iahfl51gtrec1d0iatcih659ibs7lpv3c5@ 4ax.com:
    >>>
    >>>> On Thu, 21 Jan 2010 01:49:34 GMT, PeterL1
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>Hmmmmmmmmmmmm :-/
    >>>>>
    >>>>>I posted this on the 19th, and for some reason, it didn't go through
    >>>>>:-/ Seems to be an on again/off again problem with 'Bigpong'.
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>From: PeterL1 <[email protected]>
    >>>>>Message-ID: <[email protected]>
    >>>>>Date: Mon, 18 Jan 2010 14:09:37 GMT
    >>>>>NNTP-Posting-Date: Tue, 19 Jan 2010 01:09:37 EST
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>koko <[email protected]> wrote in
    >>>>>news:3ko7l59s8iuu5q5rgucasookj2om8mhvut@ 4ax.com:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> Tonight I made a totally outstanding Garlic Pork dinner.
    >>>>>> Pork cooked in a garlic, cilantro paste then finished in a sweet
    >>>>>> fish sauce.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> This is posted on my blog if you prefer to read it there.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> The recipe is from Nick on abf. It's his wife Jun's recipe.
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> http://i50.tinypic.com/24vmuiw.jpg
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> First thing to do is make the garlic, cilantro paste and the
    >>>>>> sauce. Gather the ingredients. Garlic, cilantro, white
    >>>>>> peppercorns, sugar, water and fish sauce.
    >>>>>> http://i50.tinypic.com/2i8txqg.jpg
    >>>>>
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Hmmmmmm, Sarawak White Pepper. Does it actually come from Sarawak?
    >>>>
    >>>> Hmmmmmmm, I didn't realize Sarawak was a place, I always thought it
    >>>> was a way of processing the peppercorns.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I spent of a bit of time in the region :-)

    >>
    >> And that would be where? I'm embarrassed to admit I'm geographically
    >> challenged.
    >>>

    >
    >
    >It's a Malaysian State on the Island of Borneo.
    >
    >http://www.airbornetravelkk.com/publ...ges/my_map.gif
    >
    >
    >http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarawak


    Thank you so much. I guess I could have gotten off my lazy fingers and
    looked it up myself. I appreciate the links.

    I didn't realize I was using such an "exotic" spice.

    >
    >There's also a couple of large Orangutan Sanctuary's there. We'll be doing
    >a "volunteer holiday" to one of them in the next few years.
    >
    >http://www.volunteerabroad.com/listi.../listing/60315


    Oh man, I'd love to do that. I've bookmarked this link. What an
    adventure that would be.

    koko
    --

    There is no love more sincere than the love of food
    George Bernard Shaw
    www.kokoscorner.typepad.com
    updated 01/17/10

  16. #16
    PeterL1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Mu Gratiem (Garlic Pork) w/photos

    koko <[email protected]> wrote in news:iogkl5dnv7otvlbesoi6freid2nnuq671n@
    4ax.com:

    > On Fri, 22 Jan 2010 04:57:59 GMT, PeterL2 <[email protected]>
    > wrote:


    >>It's a Malaysian State on the Island of Borneo.
    >>
    >>http://www.airbornetravelkk.com/publ...ges/my_map.gif
    >>
    >>
    >>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarawak

    >
    > Thank you so much. I guess I could have gotten off my lazy fingers and
    > looked it up myself. I appreciate the links.




    My pleasure, ma'am.

    It's an area I've/we've just started revisiting/travelling to (Malaysia),
    so I spent a bit of time looking for new places to go :-)



    >
    > I didn't realize I was using such an "exotic" spice.



    :-)

    I wouldn't call the locale 'exotic'.... but certainly the method to obtain
    them would be :-)


    "Sarawak white peppercorns: Long considered the ne plus ultra of white
    pepper. Very clean, creamy colored peppercorns from Malaysian Borneo,
    cultivated in small mountain plots by members of the Bidayuh tribe. Pepper
    berries are hand plucked when ripe and washed in cool running spring water
    for up to two weeks."

    Here's a little bit on the Bidayu Tribe, where your peppercorns are
    grown.....

    http://www.asiaexplorers.com/malaysi...wak_cultural_v
    illage.htm


    http://tinyurl.com/yb67gz3


    Also.........

    http://www.virtualmalaysia.com/visit...ple.cfm?type=5

    Bidayuh
    The Bidayuh is well known as a peace-loving and easygoing people, it was
    their gentleness that so enchanted the first White Rajah. They are also
    famous for their hospitality. The Bidayuh are reputed to be the best
    makers of tuak, or rice wine.

    But it was because of their mild disposition that the Bidayuh was
    dislodged by the influx of new tribes. The Bidayuh retreated from the
    lowlands to seek refuge in the mountainous areas, which were easier to
    defend. They built fortified longhouses, which led Europeans to call them
    "Land Dayaks" to distinguish them from the Iban - the "Sea Dayaks.

    The Bidayuhs' meekness belies their headhunting past. In their baruk, a
    roundhouse that rises about 1.5 metres off the ground, the Bidayuh store
    their skulls. The baruk also served as a gathering place for when the
    tribe was under attack.

    Although of the same ethnic group, the Bidayuh speak a number of different
    but related dialects that to some extent is mutually intelligible. Some of
    the Bidayuh still practice traditional religions, but Christian
    missionaries have made converts among them.



    >
    >>
    >>There's also a couple of large Orangutan Sanctuary's there. We'll be

    doing
    >>a "volunteer holiday" to one of them in the next few years.
    >>
    >>http://www.volunteerabroad.com/listi.../listing/60315

    >
    > Oh man, I'd love to do that. I've bookmarked this link. What an
    > adventure that would be.
    >



    Definitely would be. The SO got hooked on "Orangutan Island" on the Animal
    Planet (Foxtel).

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orangutan_Island

    We've already adopted a Trainee Seeing Eye Dog, 'Joy'.........

    http://www.recfoodcooking.com/pet/sh...20Lucas%29.jpg

    and the SO has her heart set on adopting little 'Asapa'...

    http://www.orangutan.net/how-to-help/adoption

    Looks like we're going to have quite a menagerie :-)


    So anyways, we decided that we'd get a long planned holiday out of the way
    (Thailand), and then we'd do a Volunteer Abroad stint. Either before that,
    or after that, we're going to do Vietnam.

    I saw a great segment on Food Lovers Guide to the Planet about a
    restaurant in Hanoi called KOTO......... but I'll start a new thread on
    that :-)


    --
    Peter Lucas
    Brisbane
    Australia

    Killfile all Google Groups posters.........

    http://improve-usenet.org/

    http://improve-usenet.org/filters_bg.html

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