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Thread: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

  1. #1
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    Here is is as promised. I just picked up the book from
    the library last night. I'm going to try to make this
    sometime soon. It really sounds good to me.
    Kate

    STRANGOZZI WITH CHARD AND ALMOND SAUCE
    (Strangozzi con Salsa di Bietole e Mardorle - Umbria)

    Chard and Pesto:
    2 lb. Swiss chard
    1 c. loosely packed fresh basil leaves
    1/4 c. loosely packed fresh mint leaves
    4 plump cloves garlic, 2 peeled and crushed, 2 peeled and sliced
    10 T. extra-virgin olive oil
    1 1/2 t. kosher salt
    1/3 c. sliced almonds, toasted
    1/2 t. peperoncino flakes, or to taste

    Pasta:
    1 batch (1 1/2 lb.) Homemade Strangozzi
    extra-virgin olive oil, for finishing
    1 c. freshly grated parmigiano-reggiano, plus more for serving

    Bring large pot of well-salted water (6 qt. + 1 T. salt) to boil. Rinse
    and drain chard, cut off stems. If central rib is thick and tough, cut
    it out. Pile up leaves and slice them crosswise into strips about 1"
    wide. When water boils, heap chard into pot and stir, submerging the
    strips. Return to boil and cook until tender, about 10 minutes. With
    strainer remove chard and drop into colander. Turn off heat and save
    pot of hot water for cooking strangozzi. When chard has drained and
    cooled a bit, squeeze by handfuls, pressing out the liquid. Loosen the
    clumps and pile in the colander. For pesto: Put basil, mint, crushed
    garlic, 3 T. olive oil, and 1 t. salt into food processor. Process to a
    chunky paste, about 10 seconds. Add almonds and process for 10 seconds
    until you have a smooth, bright green paste. Pour remaining 7 T. olive
    oil into large skillet set over medium-high heat. Scatter in the sliced
    garlic and cook for 1-2 minutes, until it is sizzling. Drop in the
    chard, season with peperoncino, and the remaining ½ t. salt, and stir.
    Ladle in 1/2 c. hot water from pot and bring to a boil. Cook rapidly
    for several minutes, until water has reduced by half. Lower heat to
    simmer. Bring chard cooking water back to boil. Add strangozzi,
    stirring and separating the strands. Cover pot and rapidly return water
    to boil. Set cover ajar and cook about 5 minutes, stirring occasionally
    until barely al dente. With strainer and tongs remove strangozzi from
    water, drain a moment, and drop into skillet with simmering chard. Toss
    together quickly and spread all the herb-almond pesto on top. Rinse out
    the food processor bowl with 1/2 c. hot water from pot and pour that
    into pasta. Over low heat, toss pasta, chard, and pesto together for
    1-2 minutes until strangozzi are all coated and perfectly al dente. If
    dressing is soupy, reduce it quickly over high heat; if it’s too dense,
    thin it with more pasta water. Turn off heat, sprinkle 1 c. or so of
    grated cheese over strangozzi and toss well. Finish with drizzle of
    live oil. Toss again. Heap into warm bowls. Serve immediately with
    more cheese. Makes sauce for 1 batch strangozzi or other pasta. Serves
    6. (From “Lidia Cooks from the Heart of Italy” by Lidia Bastianich)

    Homemade Strangozzi:
    1/2 lb. flour
    1 3/4 c. fine semolina flour
    1/2 t. kosher salt
    1 1/4 c. ice water

    Put flours and salt in food processor and process a few seconds. With
    processor running pour in water through feed tube. Process for 30
    seconds, until a dough forms and gathers on blade. If dough does not
    gather or process easily it is too wet or too dry. Feel dough and add
    either more flour or more water in small amounts. Turn dough out on
    lightly floured surface and knead briefly by hand until smooth, soft,
    and stretchy. Press into disk, wrap well in plastic wrap, and let rest
    at room temperature for at least 1/2 hour. (Refrigerate dough for up to
    1 day or freeze for a month or more. Defrost in fridge and return to
    room temperature before rolling.) Cut into 6 equal portions. Lightly
    flour and put through pasta machine at progressively thinner settings
    (but not the thinnest setting), extruding it into a long strip about
    1/8" thick, 20" long, and 5" wide. Lay sheets flat on lightly floured
    trays. Dust tops with flour and cover loosely with towel. Let dry for
    15-30 minutes. To form strangozzi: Lay out one pasta strip on floured
    surface and roll it up from both short ends, making 2 fairly tight coils
    that meet in the middle, like an old-fashioned scroll. Slice the scroll
    crosswise, down through both coils, at 1/4" intervals. From a 5" wide
    scroll you should get about 20 pieces. To unfold the strangozzi slide a
    long knife blade under the center of the cut pieces, without separating
    them. Make sure knife is in exact center where the 2 rolls meet. Lift
    knife and dough off table, jiggle knife gently and coils will unroll on
    either side of knife. If dough is sticky in spots unroll with fingers.
    Lower strands to work surface and slide off knife. Gather all into a
    loose nest and set it on floured towel or tray. Repeat with rest of
    dough. Leave nests uncovered to air-dry at room temperature until
    you’re ready to cook them . (Or freeze nests on tray until solid and
    then pack in airtight ziplock bags.)

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  2. #2
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    Kate,

    Snipped and saved the recipe.

    Reading through the recipe, there's certainly no short cuts the first time
    around.

    I noticed the one ½ fraction. What happened to the rest of them?

    Thanks!

    Best,

    Andy and Kitchen Kate

  3. #3
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    Andy wrote:
    > Kate,
    >
    > Snipped and saved the recipe.
    >
    > Reading through the recipe, there's certainly no short cuts the first time
    > around.
    >
    > I noticed the one ½ fraction. What happened to the rest of them?
    >
    > Thanks!
    >
    > Best,
    >
    > Andy and Kitchen Kate


    Ah, the fractions . . . . Well, when I type in recipes or
    copy them to a file on my computer, I format them the way
    I like them. I like the "special character" version of the
    fractions and always use those. However when I copy and
    paste one of my recipes a message to the newsgroup I go through
    and change all the fractions back to the "1/2" version since many
    people get garbage when I leave the special characters in.
    I guess I missed one of them. I'm glad you could read it. :-)

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    “If I were as old as I feel, I’d be dead already.”
    Goldfish: “The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.”
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  4. #4
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    Kate wrote:

    > Ah, the fractions . . . . Well, when I type in recipes or
    > copy them to a file on my computer, I format them the way
    > I like them. I like the "special character" version of the
    > fractions and always use those. However when I copy and
    > paste one of my recipes a message to the newsgroup I go through
    > and change all the fractions back to the "1/2" version since many
    > people get garbage when I leave the special characters in.
    > I guess I missed one of them. I'm glad you could read it. :-)


    Thanks for taking the time to do that, and thanks for typing and posting
    that recipe!

    Bob




  5. #5
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    On Wed, 03 Mar 2010 12:46:05 -0500, Kate Connally wrote:

    > Andy wrote:
    >> Kate,
    >>
    >> Snipped and saved the recipe.
    >>
    >> Reading through the recipe, there's certainly no short cuts the first time
    >> around.
    >>
    >> I noticed the one ½ fraction. What happened to the rest of them?
    >>
    >> Thanks!
    >>
    >> Best,
    >>
    >> Andy and Kitchen Kate

    >
    > Ah, the fractions . . . . Well, when I type in recipes or
    > copy them to a file on my computer, I format them the way
    > I like them. I like the "special character" version of the
    > fractions and always use those. However when I copy and
    > paste one of my recipes a message to the newsgroup I go through
    > and change all the fractions back to the "1/2" version since many
    > people get garbage when I leave the special characters in.
    > I guess I missed one of them. I'm glad you could read it. :-)
    >
    > Kate


    that's very thoughty of you.

    when i transcribe recipes, i use notepad, and i'm not even sure it savvies
    the special characters.

    your pal,
    blake

  6. #6
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    blake wrote:

    > when i transcribe recipes, i use notepad, and i'm not even sure it savvies
    > the special characters.


    Yes, Notepad can handle fraction characters. You can use the "Replace"
    function in Notepad can change ¼ to 1/4, ½ to 1/2, and ¾ to 3/4, if you want
    to go to all that trouble. You can write a Word macro to do those three
    things with one button, too. Or you can write a bat or sed script (depending
    on your OS) to do all three things at once.

    Bob


  7. #7
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: REC: Lidia's Strangozzi with Chard and Almond Sauce

    On Thu, 4 Mar 2010 18:46:56 -0800, Bob Terwilliger wrote:

    > blake wrote:
    >
    >> when i transcribe recipes, i use notepad, and i'm not even sure it savvies
    >> the special characters.

    >
    > Yes, Notepad can handle fraction characters. You can use the "Replace"
    > function in Notepad can change ¼ to 1/4, ½ to 1/2, and ¾ to 3/4, if you want
    > to go to all that trouble. You can write a Word macro to do those three
    > things with one button, too. Or you can write a bat or sed script (depending
    > on your OS) to do all three things at once.
    >
    > Bob


    there doesn't seem to be much payback for the effort. plus, if i boop the
    straight text into some other format, no chance it will get garbled.

    your pal,
    blake

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