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Thread: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

  1. #1
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    frequent main course favorites.

    1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    cooking for extra flavor)
    1/4 cup EVOO
    1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    5 cloves garlic minced
    1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    1/2 cup dry white wine
    juice of 1 lemon
    grating of asiago cheese
    salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine

    Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.

    Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining garlic,
    parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and lemon
    juice.

    As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of tri-color
    linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to overcook.
    Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp and
    linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan depending on
    what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more parsley and
    lemon wedges.

    When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.

    I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for me.

    MartyB



  2. #2
    nurk_fred2000 Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    On Jul 20, 1:27*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    september.invalid> wrote:
    > I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    > frequent main course favorites.
    >
    > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    > cooking for extra flavor)
    > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > juice of 1 lemon
    > grating of asiago cheese
    > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine
    >
    > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.
    >
    > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining garlic,
    > parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and lemon
    > juice.
    >
    > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of tri-color
    > linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to overcook.
    > Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp and
    > linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan depending on
    > what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more parsley and
    > lemon wedges.
    >
    > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.
    >
    > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for me.
    >
    > MartyB


    ***Once again you Idiots overcook EVERYTHING...Pink shrimp at the
    bottom is bright orange at the top "Marty", that means you've
    overcooked the lot = RUBBER...Like gummy bears, ehhh...Some of you
    couldn't cook your way out of a wet paper sack!...Chemo the Clown is
    posting recipes for a 350 degree roasting oven for porkloin for 2
    hours and an internal of 170...LMAO! Under cook it to barely
    translucent as the heat from the cooking, the pasta, and the sauce and
    steam will continue to cook the shrimp for at least 2 additional
    minutes...Brutal!

  3. #3
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    On Jul 20, 2:36*pm, nurk_fred2000 <nurk_fred2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 20, 1:27*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > september.invalid> wrote:
    > > I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    > > frequent main course favorites.

    >
    > > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    > > cooking for extra flavor)
    > > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > > juice of 1 lemon
    > > grating of asiago cheese
    > > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine

    >
    > > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    > > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.

    >
    > > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    > > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining garlic,
    > > parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and lemon
    > > juice.

    >
    > > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of tri-color
    > > linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to overcook.
    > > Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp and
    > > linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan dependingon
    > > what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more parsley and
    > > lemon wedges.

    >
    > > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.

    >
    > > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp forme.

    >
    > > MartyB

    >
    > ***Once again you Idiots overcook EVERYTHING...Pink shrimp at the
    > bottom is bright orange at the top "Marty", that *means you've
    > overcooked the lot = RUBBER...Like gummy bears, ehhh...Some of you
    > couldn't cook your way out of a wet paper sack!...Chemo the Clown is
    > posting recipes for a 350 degree roasting oven for porkloin for 2
    > hours and an internal of 170...LMAO! *Under cook it to barely
    > translucent as the heat from the cooking, the pasta, and the sauce and
    > steam will continue to cook the shrimp for at least 2 additional
    > minutes...Brutal!


    Another episode of "Idiot Chef Fred".

  4. #4
    nurk_fred2000 Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    On Jul 20, 2:50*pm, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 20, 2:36*pm, nurk_fred2000 <nurk_fred2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jul 20, 1:27*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-

    >
    > > september.invalid> wrote:
    > > > I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    > > > frequent main course favorites.

    >
    > > > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit onwhile
    > > > cooking for extra flavor)
    > > > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > > > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > > > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > > > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > > > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > > > juice of 1 lemon
    > > > grating of asiago cheese
    > > > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > > > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine

    >
    > > > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    > > > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.

    >
    > > > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > > > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp.When
    > > > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining garlic,
    > > > parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and lemon
    > > > juice.

    >
    > > > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of tri-color
    > > > linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to overcook.
    > > > Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp and
    > > > linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan depending on
    > > > what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more parsley and
    > > > lemon wedges.

    >
    > > > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > > > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.

    >
    > > > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for me.

    >
    > > > MartyB

    >
    > > ***Once again you Idiots overcook EVERYTHING...Pink shrimp at the
    > > bottom is bright orange at the top "Marty", that *means you've
    > > overcooked the lot = RUBBER...Like gummy bears, ehhh...Some of you
    > > couldn't cook your way out of a wet paper sack!...Chemo the Clown is
    > > posting recipes for a 350 degree roasting oven for porkloin for 2
    > > hours and an internal of 170...LMAO! *Under cook it to barely
    > > translucent as the heat from the cooking, the pasta, and the sauce and
    > > steam will continue to cook the shrimp for at least 2 additional
    > > minutes...Brutal!

    >
    > Another episode of "Idiot Chef Fred".


    ***Hey Chemo, anytime you want to lay some money on the line I'll be
    happy to let you pick the ingredients and we'll go mono amono...You
    pick the time and place and give me a two week lead time...Stipulation
    is its done in a commercial kitchen and not some jerkwads house ~ pick
    the taste testers right off the street as judges...I can see it now,
    you trying to saute` something expensive and delicate over an electric
    burner LMAO!...Well, I guess that's always been your style :-)

  5. #5
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    On Jul 20, 3:21*pm, nurk_fred2000 <nurk_fred2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 20, 2:50*pm, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jul 20, 2:36*pm, nurk_fred2000 <nurk_fred2...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Jul 20, 1:27*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-

    >
    > > > september.invalid> wrote:
    > > > > I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    > > > > frequent main course favorites.

    >
    > > > > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    > > > > cooking for extra flavor)
    > > > > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > > > > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > > > > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > > > > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > > > > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > > > > juice of 1 lemon
    > > > > grating of asiago cheese
    > > > > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > > > > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine

    >
    > > > > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    > > > > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.

    >
    > > > > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > > > > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    > > > > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining garlic,
    > > > > parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and lemon
    > > > > juice.

    >
    > > > > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of tri-color
    > > > > linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to overcook.
    > > > > Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp and
    > > > > linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan depending on
    > > > > what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more parsleyand
    > > > > lemon wedges.

    >
    > > > > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > > > > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.

    >
    > > > > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimpfor me.

    >
    > > > > MartyB

    >
    > > > ***Once again you Idiots overcook EVERYTHING...Pink shrimp at the
    > > > bottom is bright orange at the top "Marty", that *means you've
    > > > overcooked the lot = RUBBER...Like gummy bears, ehhh...Some of you
    > > > couldn't cook your way out of a wet paper sack!...Chemo the Clown is
    > > > posting recipes for a 350 degree roasting oven for porkloin for 2
    > > > hours and an internal of 170...LMAO! *Under cook it to barely
    > > > translucent as the heat from the cooking, the pasta, and the sauce and
    > > > steam will continue to cook the shrimp for at least 2 additional
    > > > minutes...Brutal!

    >
    > > Another episode of "Idiot Chef Fred".

    >
    > ***Hey Chemo, anytime you want to lay some money on the line I'll be
    > happy to let you pick the ingredients and we'll go mono amono...You
    > pick the time and place and give me a two week lead time...Stipulation
    > is its done in a commercial kitchen and not some jerkwads house ~ pick
    > the taste testers right *off the street as judges...I can see it now,
    > you trying to saute` something expensive and delicate over an electric
    > burner LMAO!...Well, I guess that's always been your style :-)


    Two week lead time? hahahahahahahah...........

  6. #6
    nurk_fred2000 Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    On Jul 20, 3:27*pm, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 20, 3:21*pm, nurk_fred2000 <nurk_fred2...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jul 20, 2:50*pm, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Jul 20, 2:36*pm, nurk_fred2000 <nurk_fred2...@yahoo.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > > On Jul 20, 1:27*pm, "Nunya Bidnits" <nunyabidn...@eternal-

    >
    > > > > september.invalid> wrote:
    > > > > > I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is oneof my
    > > > > > frequent main course favorites.

    >
    > > > > > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    > > > > > cooking for extra flavor)
    > > > > > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > > > > > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > > > > > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > > > > > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > > > > > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > > > > > juice of 1 lemon
    > > > > > grating of asiago cheese
    > > > > > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > > > > > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine

    >
    > > > > > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pastato the
    > > > > > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.

    >
    > > > > > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > > > > > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    > > > > > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining garlic,
    > > > > > parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and lemon
    > > > > > juice.

    >
    > > > > > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of tri-color
    > > > > > linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to overcook.
    > > > > > Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp and
    > > > > > linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan depending on
    > > > > > what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more parsley and
    > > > > > lemon wedges.

    >
    > > > > > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > > > > > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.

    >
    > > > > > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for me.

    >
    > > > > > MartyB

    >
    > > > > ***Once again you Idiots overcook EVERYTHING...Pink shrimp at the
    > > > > bottom is bright orange at the top "Marty", that *means you've
    > > > > overcooked the lot = RUBBER...Like gummy bears, ehhh...Some of you
    > > > > couldn't cook your way out of a wet paper sack!...Chemo the Clown is
    > > > > posting recipes for a 350 degree roasting oven for porkloin for 2
    > > > > hours and an internal of 170...LMAO! *Under cook it to barely
    > > > > translucent as the heat from the cooking, the pasta, and the sauce and
    > > > > steam will continue to cook the shrimp for at least 2 additional
    > > > > minutes...Brutal!

    >
    > > > Another episode of "Idiot Chef Fred".

    >
    > > ***Hey Chemo, anytime you want to lay some money on the line I'll be
    > > happy to let you pick the ingredients and we'll go mono amono...You
    > > pick the time and place and give me a two week lead time...Stipulation
    > > is its done in a commercial kitchen and not some jerkwads house ~ pick
    > > the taste testers right *off the street as judges...I can see it now,
    > > you trying to saute` something expensive and delicate over an electric
    > > burner LMAO!...Well, I guess that's always been your style :-)

    >
    > Two week lead time? hahahahahahahah...........


    ***That's just about the same lead time you need to figure out how to
    boil water, ehhh Chemo...?...Set it up and I'll be there, count on it
    ~ I'll have you busted back to dishwasher so fast it'll make your head
    spin! :-)

  7. #7
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j07dng$ijk$[email protected]..
    >I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    >frequent main course favorites.
    >
    > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on
    > while cooking for extra flavor)
    > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > juice of 1 lemon
    > grating of asiago cheese
    > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine
    >
    > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.
    >
    > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining
    > garlic, parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and
    > lemon juice.
    >
    > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of
    > tri-color linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to
    > overcook. Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp
    > and linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan
    > depending on what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more
    > parsley and lemon wedges.
    >
    > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.
    >
    > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for
    > me.
    >
    > MartyB
    >

    "(Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    cooking for extra flavor)"???? That doesn't do anything to the shrimp
    flavor.

    Do this, based on a conversation with Mark Miller, owner of the Coyote Cafe
    in Lost Wages, and Santa Fe, New Mexico.

    Peel shrimp and save shells. Shells onto skillet; brown shells slowly for 10
    minutes. Add water to skillet. Reduce down to to make concentrated shrimp
    stock. Incorporate that into your recipe.

    It will enhance the shrimp flavor a lot!

    Mark and I talked about shrimp stock while standing at the bar of his "4th
    St Grill" restaurant in Berkeley years ago.

    I'm going to have a go at it.

    Kent








  8. #8
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style


    "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j0840s$o7q$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:j07dng$ijk$[email protected]..
    >>I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    >>frequent main course favorites.
    >>
    >> 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on
    >> while cooking for extra flavor)
    >> 1/4 cup EVOO
    >> 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    >> 5 cloves garlic minced
    >> 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    >> 1/2 cup dry white wine
    >> juice of 1 lemon
    >> grating of asiago cheese
    >> salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    >> 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine
    >>
    >> Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    >> process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.
    >>
    >> Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    >> garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp.
    >> When shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining
    >> garlic, parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and
    >> lemon juice.
    >>
    >> As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of
    >> tri-color linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to
    >> overcook. Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp
    >> and linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan
    >> depending on what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more
    >> parsley and lemon wedges.
    >>
    >> When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I
    >> put any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.
    >>
    >> I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for
    >> me.
    >>
    >> MartyB
    >>

    > "(Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on while
    > cooking for extra flavor)"???? That doesn't do anything to the shrimp
    > flavor.
    >
    > Do this, based on a conversation with Mark Miller, owner of the Coyote
    > Cafe in Lost Wages, and Santa Fe, New Mexico.
    >
    > Peel shrimp and save shells. Shells onto skillet; brown shells slowly for
    > 10 minutes. Add water to skillet. Reduce down to to make concentrated
    > shrimp stock. Incorporate that into your recipe.
    >
    > It will enhance the shrimp flavor a lot!
    >
    > Mark and I talked about shrimp stock while standing at the bar of his "4th
    > St Grill" restaurant in Berkeley years ago.
    >
    > I'm going to have a go at it.
    >
    > Kent
    >

    http://www.coyotecafe.com/




  9. #9
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    Kent wrote:

    > http://www.coyotecafe.com/


    Been there. Drank a *lot* of their so-called "Brazilian daiquiris," which
    are really just rum which has been infused with pineapple, vanilla bean, and
    piloncillo.

    Before going there I already owned three of their cookbooks, all of which
    are excellent:

    http://www.amazon.com/Coyote-Cafe-Fo.../dp/0898152453
    http://www.amazon.com/Coyotes-Pantry.../dp/0898154944
    http://www.amazon.com/Cool-Coyote-Ca.../dp/0898156548

    Bob



  10. #10
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j07dng$ijk$[email protected]..
    >I like shrimp just about any way it can be cooked but this is one of my
    >frequent main course favorites.
    >
    > 1 lb 21-25 EZ-Peel shrimp (Peeled but I like to leave the tail bit on
    > while cooking for extra flavor)
    > 1/4 cup EVOO
    > 1/4 cup butter ( I use Plugra euro style butter)
    > 5 cloves garlic minced
    > 1/3 cup chopped fresh parsley
    > 1/2 cup dry white wine
    > juice of 1 lemon
    > grating of asiago cheese
    > salt to taste (not too much) and for cooking pasta
    > 1/2 lb tri-color veggie linguine
    >
    > Bring enough salted water for the pasta to a boil. Time the pasta to the
    > process below, which should take about 12 minutes max.
    >
    > Heat oil and butter on low heat. Add garlic but reserve a pinch. Sautee
    > garlic until just golden. Turn up heat to medium high and add shrimp. When
    > shrimp are pink on the bottom, turn them over, and add the remaining
    > garlic, parsley, wine, salt, a tablespoon or two of the pasta water, and
    > lemon juice.
    >
    > As soon as shrimp are firmed up and pink transfer them to a bed of
    > tri-color linguine. Pop off the tail pieces if left on. Be careful not to
    > overcook. Increase heat, reduce the sauce a bit, and pour over the shrimp
    > and linguine. Grate some asiago (or I will use romano or parmesan
    > depending on what's in the fridge) over the top. Garnish with a bit more
    > parsley and lemon wedges.
    >
    > When thawing shrimp in the bag (fresh shrimp are scarce in Missouri) I put
    > any resulting water into the pasta cooking water.
    >
    > I know it's simple but it really brings out the taste of the shrimp for
    > me.



    Simpler:

    Add shrimp, garlic, butter, white wine, lemon juice and parsely plus some
    salt to a oven ready sauce pan. Place under preheated broiler for 3 minutes
    or until just bubbly. Remove, toss with cheese and cream, place back in
    broiler for 3 minutes or until cheese is melted and you have a sauce.
    remove, toss with pasta. Serve.

    Paul



  11. #11
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4e2795d8$0$1807$c3e8da3$[email protected] b.com...
    > Kent wrote:
    >
    >> http://www.coyotecafe.com/

    >
    > Been there. Drank a *lot* of their so-called "Brazilian daiquiris," which
    > are really just rum which has been infused with pineapple, vanilla bean,
    > and piloncillo.
    >
    > Before going there I already owned three of their cookbooks, all of which
    > are excellent:
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Coyote-Cafe-Fo.../dp/0898152453
    > http://www.amazon.com/Coyotes-Pantry.../dp/0898154944
    > http://www.amazon.com/Cool-Coyote-Ca.../dp/0898156548
    >
    > Bob
    >

    Mark Miller, before he owned or wrote was the chef for Chez Panisse under
    Alice Waters. Chez Panisse is the restaurant that started "California
    Cooking". Here's an intresting site.
    http://books.google.com/books?id=FlC...ler%22&f=false
    Alice Waters, the owner of Chez Panisse, at some level made all of this
    happen. She in some fashion nurtured Mark Miller, Jeremiah Tower, the Acme
    Bakery, and lots of others to create something we didn't have before.

    Kent










  12. #12
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: REC - Dinner Last Night - Shrimp "Scampi" style

    Kent tried one-upping:

    > Mark Miller, before he owned or wrote was the chef for Chez Panisse under
    > Alice Waters. Chez Panisse is the restaurant that started "California
    > Cooking". Here's an intresting site.
    > http://books.google.com/books?id=FlC...ler%22&f=false
    > Alice Waters, the owner of Chez Panisse, at some level made all of this
    > happen. She in some fashion nurtured Mark Miller, Jeremiah Tower, the Acme
    > Bakery, and lots of others to create something we didn't have before.


    Whatever, dude.

    Bob



  13. #13
    Kent Guest

    Default "California Cuisine"


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    news:4e27b131$0$1941$c3e8da3$[email protected] b.com...
    > Kent tried one-upping:
    >
    >> Mark Miller, before he owned or wrote was the chef for Chez Panisse under
    >> Alice Waters. Chez Panisse is the restaurant that started "California
    >> Cooking". Here's an intresting site.
    >> http://books.google.com/books?id=FlC...ler%22&f=false
    >> Alice Waters, the owner of Chez Panisse, at some level made all of this
    >> happen. She in some fashion nurtured Mark Miller, Jeremiah Tower, the
    >> Acme
    >> Bakery, and lots of others to create something we didn't have before.

    >
    > Whatever, dude.
    >
    > Bob
    >

    I was just making a parenthetical comment about Mark Miller that I find
    interesting, and think others might as well. I have no interest in
    one-upping. I have the above book on reserve at our local library. We
    started going to Alice Waters' Chez Panisse, Mark Miller's 4th St. Grill,
    and Jeremiah Tower's Santa Fe Bar and Grill when all opened. The whole
    culinary explosion occured right in our back yard.

    Kent




  14. #14
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: "California Cuisine"

    Kent piled it on:

    >> Kent tried one-upping:
    >>
    >>> Mark Miller, before he owned or wrote was the chef for Chez Panisse
    >>> under Alice Waters. Chez Panisse is the restaurant that started
    >>> "California Cooking". Here's an intresting site.
    >>> http://books.google.com/books?id=FlC...ler%22&f=false
    >>> Alice Waters, the owner of Chez Panisse, at some level made all of this
    >>> happen. She in some fashion nurtured Mark Miller, Jeremiah Tower, the
    >>> Acme Bakery, and lots of others to create something we didn't have
    >>> before.

    >>
    >> Whatever, dude.
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>

    > I was just making a parenthetical comment about Mark Miller that I find
    > interesting, and think others might as well. I have no interest in
    > one-upping. I have the above book on reserve at our local library. We
    > started going to Alice Waters' Chez Panisse, Mark Miller's 4th St. Grill,
    > and Jeremiah Tower's Santa Fe Bar and Grill when all opened. The whole
    > culinary explosion occured right in our back yard.



    Fascinating! Do go on!

    Bob



  15. #15
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: "California Cuisine"

    On Wed, 20 Jul 2011 22:51:19 -0700, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    >news:4e27b131$0$1941$c3e8da3$[email protected] eb.com...
    >> Kent tried one-upping:
    >>
    >>> Mark Miller, before he owned or wrote was the chef for Chez Panisse under
    >>> Alice Waters. Chez Panisse is the restaurant that started "California
    >>> Cooking". Here's an intresting site.
    >>> http://books.google.com/books?id=FlC...ler%22&f=false
    >>> Alice Waters, the owner of Chez Panisse, at some level made all of this
    >>> happen. She in some fashion nurtured Mark Miller, Jeremiah Tower, the
    >>> Acme
    >>> Bakery, and lots of others to create something we didn't have before.


    I have that book, Kent. It is a fascinating read, about the dawn of
    Chez Panisse,and the people (especially Alice) who brought it about.
    And about the reach of her influence, which was extensive then, and
    now.

    The book isn't a fawning over Alice Waters, and it sometimes paints
    her in a not so flattering light.

    This is the 40th anniversary year of Chez Panisse, and oh how I wish I
    could afford to go to one of the dinners being held this August at the
    restaurant.

    There have been some other books written about those times. Jeramiah
    Tower's book California Dish is one such, but it tends to be a bit
    snide sometimes. Tower has/had a towering ego (no pun intended), but
    he was considered a damn fine cook, and he is one such that helped put
    Chez Panisse on the map. I moved to the bay area in 1985 when his
    restaurant Stars was becoming one of the top spots in town. I wish I
    taken the chance to go to that restaurant when it was open.

    One of the most influential people in that whole time period was an
    American expatriate, Richard Olney. He influenced Alice, Jeramiah,
    Kermit Lynch, and a whole host of people that were in that food circle
    and who were putting California cuisine on the map. He was a
    continuing influence on the restaurant up until the time he died, and
    probably even now. His ideas about good food and cooking were some of
    the guiding principles of that restaurant.

    Another interesting author to read about all this is Ruth Reichl..who
    was living in Berkeley during the first years of Chez Panisse, and who
    counted a number of folks who were "developing" this cuisine as her
    close friends.

    I have been so interested in all of this since I first moved to the
    east bay back in 1985. I had gotten The Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook
    only a year or so before that, and it fascinated me. I was also
    picking up books here and there from various folks that had passed
    through the kitchens of Chez Panisse, such as Deborah Madison, Joyce
    Goldstein, Mark Miller, Paul Bertolli, Joanne Weir, Lindsay Shere
    (the wonderful inaugural pastry chef of Chez Panisse), Victoria Wise
    and I forget who else. Oh, also Jeramiah's book from that era.

    The influence of Chez Panisse is still felt in the bay area. Acme
    Bread, which has such wonderful bread,is still roaring along. Steve
    Sullivan, who started that bakery, wasn't even a cook in the
    restaurant, but he worked there in Chez Panisse...and was influenced
    by all he encountered, to want to produce great bread. And succeed,
    he did. It is such a treat to go by Acme Bread there in Berkeley,
    when the fresh loaves are coming out of the oven. In that same
    little corner lot, is Kermit Lynch's wine shop, and Cafe Fanny, which
    was named for Alice Water's daughter.

    Hmm..now I am wanting to get up to Berkeley.. Maybe this week...

    Christine


    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  16. #16
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: "California Cuisine"

    Christine wrote:

    > This is the 40th anniversary year of Chez Panisse, and oh how I wish I
    > could afford to go to one of the dinners being held this August at the
    > restaurant.


    At $2500 a head for the meal prepared by David Tanis, what if he served
    something you didn't like, were allergic to, or were unable to eat for some
    medical reason?

    It just so happens that I'll be on vacation from August 21 through September
    6, so I *could* attend if I so chose. But I will allow this "opportunity" to
    pass, thankyouverymuch.

    I'd rather prepare a "Provencal feast" using local ingredients at my own
    house, thereby not only saving a colossal amount of money and following the
    precepts of "California cuisine", but avoiding the pandemonian cluster-****
    that is Berkeley traffic -- and not incidentally, also assuring myself of a
    meal I will enjoy, in company I can choose.

    Bob



  17. #17
    Sky Guest

    Default Holey Moley Prices; was Re: "California Cuisine"

    On 7/21/2011 3:45 AM, Bob Terwilliger wrote:
    >
    > At $2500 a head for the meal prepared by David Tanis, what if he served
    > something you didn't like, were allergic to, or were unable to eat for some
    > medical reason?


    Good heavens, $2500 for a single meal for a person at a restaurant
    ??!!!! OUCH. Why so high a price? Just because they can? If that's
    the case, then perhaps a 'boycott' is justified? However, since it's
    California, I'm sure there are folks who'll bite (ouch!) and pay. I bet
    substitutions aren't allowed either, but that's conjecture on my part.

    Sky, who can only wish her wallet to allow such a budget! <G>

    --

    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  18. #18
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Holey Moley Prices; was Re: "California Cuisine"

    Sky wrote:

    >> At $2500 a head for the meal prepared by David Tanis, what if he served
    >> something you didn't like, were allergic to, or were unable to eat for
    >> some
    >> medical reason?

    >
    > Good heavens, $2500 for a single meal for a person at a restaurant ??!!!!
    > OUCH. Why so high a price? Just because they can? If that's the case,
    > then perhaps a 'boycott' is justified? However, since it's California,
    > I'm sure there are folks who'll bite (ouch!) and pay. I bet substitutions
    > aren't allowed either, but that's conjecture on my part.


    Proceeds from the dinner go to the Chez Panisse Foundation, so diners will
    be able to pat themselves on the back for being so generous to charity --
    which is pretty much par for the course in Berkeley. That being said, the
    chefs and restaurant employees are not DONATING their services for the
    evening; I'm sure the guest chefs will be paid handsomely.

    Come to think of it, would you still tip somewhere in the 20% range for that
    dinner? (Cha-CHING!)

    Bob




  19. #19
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: "California Cuisine"


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 20 Jul 2011 22:51:19 -0700, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> wrote in message
    >>news:4e27b131$0$1941$c3e8da3$[email protected] web.com...
    >>> Kent tried one-upping:
    >>>
    >>>> Mark Miller, before he owned or wrote was the chef for Chez Panisse
    >>>> under
    >>>> Alice Waters. Chez Panisse is the restaurant that started "California
    >>>> Cooking". Here's an intresting site.
    >>>> http://books.google.com/books?id=FlC...ler%22&f=false
    >>>> Alice Waters, the owner of Chez Panisse, at some level made all of this
    >>>> happen. She in some fashion nurtured Mark Miller, Jeremiah Tower, the
    >>>> Acme
    >>>> Bakery, and lots of others to create something we didn't have before.

    >
    > I have that book, Kent. It is a fascinating read, about the dawn of
    > Chez Panisse,and the people (especially Alice) who brought it about.
    > And about the reach of her influence, which was extensive then, and
    > now.
    >
    > The book isn't a fawning over Alice Waters, and it sometimes paints
    > her in a not so flattering light.
    >
    > This is the 40th anniversary year of Chez Panisse, and oh how I wish I
    > could afford to go to one of the dinners being held this August at the
    > restaurant.
    >
    > There have been some other books written about those times. Jeramiah
    > Tower's book California Dish is one such, but it tends to be a bit
    > snide sometimes. Tower has/had a towering ego (no pun intended), but
    > he was considered a damn fine cook, and he is one such that helped put
    > Chez Panisse on the map. I moved to the bay area in 1985 when his
    > restaurant Stars was becoming one of the top spots in town. I wish I
    > taken the chance to go to that restaurant when it was open.
    >
    > One of the most influential people in that whole time period was an
    > American expatriate, Richard Olney. He influenced Alice, Jeramiah,
    > Kermit Lynch, and a whole host of people that were in that food circle
    > and who were putting California cuisine on the map. He was a
    > continuing influence on the restaurant up until the time he died, and
    > probably even now. His ideas about good food and cooking were some of
    > the guiding principles of that restaurant.
    >
    > Another interesting author to read about all this is Ruth Reichl..who
    > was living in Berkeley during the first years of Chez Panisse, and who
    > counted a number of folks who were "developing" this cuisine as her
    > close friends.
    >
    > I have been so interested in all of this since I first moved to the
    > east bay back in 1985. I had gotten The Chez Panisse Menu Cookbook
    > only a year or so before that, and it fascinated me. I was also
    > picking up books here and there from various folks that had passed
    > through the kitchens of Chez Panisse, such as Deborah Madison, Joyce
    > Goldstein, Mark Miller, Paul Bertolli, Joanne Weir, Lindsay Shere
    > (the wonderful inaugural pastry chef of Chez Panisse), Victoria Wise
    > and I forget who else. Oh, also Jeramiah's book from that era.
    >
    > The influence of Chez Panisse is still felt in the bay area. Acme
    > Bread, which has such wonderful bread,is still roaring along. Steve
    > Sullivan, who started that bakery, wasn't even a cook in the
    > restaurant, but he worked there in Chez Panisse...and was influenced
    > by all he encountered, to want to produce great bread. And succeed,
    > he did. It is such a treat to go by Acme Bread there in Berkeley,
    > when the fresh loaves are coming out of the oven. In that same
    > little corner lot, is Kermit Lynch's wine shop, and Cafe Fanny, which
    > was named for Alice Water's daughter.
    >
    > Hmm..now I am wanting to get up to Berkeley.. Maybe this week...
    >
    > Christine
    >
    >

    What a great post, Christine. You bring out her warmth. Years ago I wandered
    into the restaurant one day to ask about charcoal and Alice, who happened to
    be in the dining room treated me like a neighbor, without knowing me. We ate
    there a lot, in the old days. We really preferred the upstairs cafe with a
    menu, rather than the prix fixe dinner downstairs. It's possible that
    Jeremiah acted as the host there for awhile. Just after that he opened the
    Santa Fe Bar and Grill in the old railroad station down on University Ave.
    That became a favorite, though unfortunately it moved to and became Stars in
    SF. I had forgotten about Victoria Wise. "Pig by the Tail" was the benchmark
    charcuterie for "everywhere in the world" as far as we were concerned. We'd
    call, reserve, and pick up the cassoulet. It was wonderful. I'm sure as you
    well know, Victoria Wise has become quite a cookbook author. The Acme we
    still hang out at. The last bake comes out at 2:30 and that's when you get a
    warm baguette. We eat our first bite in the car on the way out the driveway.

    There are a number of things that make the Bay Area very special. It's
    beautiful. Then, and most important, it has the whole ethnic spectrum in the
    world. Within 25 miles of downtown Sam Francisco you travel around the
    world. And finally, it has magic people like Alice Waters.

    Kent




  20. #20
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: "California Cuisine"

    On Thu, 21 Jul 2011 02:32:28 -0700, "Kent" <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    We really preferred the upstairs cafe with a
    >menu, rather than the prix fixe dinner downstairs. It's possible that
    >Jeremiah acted as the host there for awhile. Just after that he opened the
    >Santa Fe Bar and Grill in the old railroad station down on University Ave.
    >That became a favorite, though unfortunately it moved to and became Stars in
    >SF.


    I ate at the Cafe about 9 years ago..maybe less. I was very
    impressed... If I could manage the steps, I would go back in a flash.
    But my knees just can't handle them anymore. I do consider going to
    the downstairs restaurant though. I would love to eat there before
    David Tanis leaves for good this fall.

    Jeremiah Tower was considered one of the pre-eminent chefs in the
    area. He didn't move the Santa Fe Bar and Grill, but he did leave it
    about the time I got to the bay area. He had already opened Stars.
    They are two separate restaurants, or were. I know. I ate at the
    Santa Fe Bar and Grill for my 50th birthday..a few years before it
    closed for good. Stars had closed before then.

    I had forgotten about Victoria Wise. "Pig by the Tail" was the
    benchmark
    >charcuterie for "everywhere in the world" as far as we were concerned. We'd
    >call, reserve, and pick up the cassoulet. It was wonderful. I'm sure as you
    >well know, Victoria Wise has become quite a cookbook author. The Acme we
    >still hang out at. The last bake comes out at 2:30 and that's when you get a
    >warm baguette. We eat our first bite in the car on the way out the driveway.


    Yes, I have some of her cookbooks, of which The Pig By The Tail
    Cookbook is one.

    Another place I forgot about was Cocolat. I was lucky enough to get
    there when it was still around, down the street from Chez Panisse. Oh
    what pastries. I have some of the books by Alice Medrich. I have
    tried to recreate some of the Cocolat desserts in the past.

    And I forgot another alumni of Chez Panisse..Judy Rodgers, who went on
    to be the proprietor of Zuni Cafe.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

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