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Thread: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    Have any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in
    the book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the
    source will follow).

    Apple Pudding
    Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples
    to make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking
    dish. Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful
    ground cinnamon. [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to
    mix the sugar and the cinnamon.]
    Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    Add a thrid layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing
    off the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon
    and sugar.
    Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. This makes a fine
    flavor, but may be omitted if you prefer.
    Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This makes
    fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half
    a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At
    first I was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but
    one uses boiling water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I
    am thinking I might use cider here.]
    Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served
    cold and is nice for a school luncheon....

    Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along
    with the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.

    Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that
    one wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish,
    which is supposed to be buttered.

    Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago:
    Rand McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.

    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    cshenk Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    Jean B. wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    > recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    > Have any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the
    > book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source
    > will follow).
    >
    > Apple Pudding
    > Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    > make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit. Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread
    > crumbs. Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered
    > baking dish. Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs. Sprinkle over
    > the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground cinnamon.
    > [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar and the
    > cinnamon.] Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. Add
    > another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs, butter,
    > sugar, and cinnamon as before. Add a thrid layer, using the last
    > cupful of apple and finishing off the top with the last third of the
    > crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar. Now over the top drip the juice
    > of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor, but may be omitted if you
    > prefer. Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This
    > makes fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use
    > half a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    > Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    > was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses
    > boiling water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking
    > I might use cider here.] Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    > Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served cold
    > and is nice for a school luncheon....
    >
    > Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along
    > with the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >
    > Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    > wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    > supposed to be buttered.
    >
    > Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago: Rand
    > McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.


    Hi Jean, I'd not seen this typed up before so thank you. It's a not
    uncommon type of recipe from my youth along the eastern mountain ranges
    (USA). It has many variations but they are all similar in general form
    though they may have used beet-root sugar or sorghum or molassis (sp?)
    or even honey in place of the sugar. The sweetner was what you had and
    the amount used was adjusted to accomodate a more bitter-sour apple if
    that helps. The one you post works with a crabapple level.

    In the southerly set where 'muskydines' (think of grapes as a relative
    in taste) grow well, they would be added to reduce the amount of sugar
    needed come depression era (and may have been used before then).

    Today, tart fruits are the common side part, not the lemon. I *think*
    you are looking at an upscale representation of a farmers dish that was
    well known then, and still can be recognized by folks from some areas.

  3. #3
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi Jean, I'd not seen this typed up before so thank you. It's a not
    > uncommon type of recipe from my youth along the eastern mountain ranges


    I missed it the first time around, so I will thank Jean as well.
    It's very much like a pudding my mom used to make that she cannot
    remember the recipe for at all. I am going to try this soon.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  4. #4
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    cshenk wrote:
    > Jean B. wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    >> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    >> recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    >> Have any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the
    >> book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source
    >> will follow).
    >>
    >> Apple Pudding
    >> Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    >> make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit. Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread
    >> crumbs. Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered
    >> baking dish. Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs. Sprinkle over
    >> the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground cinnamon.
    >> [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar and the
    >> cinnamon.] Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. Add
    >> another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs, butter,
    >> sugar, and cinnamon as before. Add a thrid layer, using the last
    >> cupful of apple and finishing off the top with the last third of the
    >> crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar. Now over the top drip the juice
    >> of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor, but may be omitted if you
    >> prefer. Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This
    >> makes fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use
    >> half a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    >> Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    >> was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses
    >> boiling water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking
    >> I might use cider here.] Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    >> Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served cold
    >> and is nice for a school luncheon....
    >>
    >> Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along
    >> with the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >>
    >> Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    >> wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    >> supposed to be buttered.
    >>
    >> Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago: Rand
    >> McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.

    >
    > Hi Jean, I'd not seen this typed up before so thank you. It's a not
    > uncommon type of recipe from my youth along the eastern mountain ranges
    > (USA). It has many variations but they are all similar in general form
    > though they may have used beet-root sugar or sorghum or molassis (sp?)
    > or even honey in place of the sugar. The sweetner was what you had and
    > the amount used was adjusted to accomodate a more bitter-sour apple if
    > that helps. The one you post works with a crabapple level.
    >
    > In the southerly set where 'muskydines' (think of grapes as a relative
    > in taste) grow well, they would be added to reduce the amount of sugar
    > needed come depression era (and may have been used before then).
    >
    > Today, tart fruits are the common side part, not the lemon. I *think*
    > you are looking at an upscale representation of a farmers dish that was
    > well known then, and still can be recognized by folks from some areas.


    Oh! Thanks for the insight into this. Maybe if I thumbed through
    some of my regional cookbooks, I'd find something similar. It was
    and is just so interesting to me, and it sounds like the results
    could be quite palatable.

    --
    Jean B.

  5. #5
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    Ranée at Arabian Knits wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > "cshenk" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Hi Jean, I'd not seen this typed up before so thank you. It's a not
    >> uncommon type of recipe from my youth along the eastern mountain ranges

    >
    > I missed it the first time around, so I will thank Jean as well.
    > It's very much like a pudding my mom used to make that she cannot
    > remember the recipe for at all. I am going to try this soon.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ranee @ Arabian Knits
    >
    > "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13
    >
    > http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/


    Well, let's all report. I may be able to get to a farm stand
    tomorrow for some apples.

    --
    Jean B.

  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)


    >> Jean B. wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    >>> recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    >>> Have any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the
    >>> book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source
    >>> will follow).
    >>>
    >>> Apple Pudding
    >>> Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    >>> make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit. Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread
    >>> crumbs. Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered
    >>> baking dish. Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs. Sprinkle over
    >>> the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground cinnamon.
    >>> [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar and the
    >>> cinnamon.] Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. Add
    >>> another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs, butter,
    >>> sugar, and cinnamon as before. Add a thrid layer, using the last
    >>> cupful of apple and finishing off the top with the last third of the
    >>> crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar. Now over the top drip the juice
    >>> of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor, but may be omitted if you
    >>> prefer. Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This
    >>> makes fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use
    >>> half a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    >>> Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    >>> was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses
    >>> boiling water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking
    >>> I might use cider here.] Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    >>> Serve hot.


    Don't know what that is but it's definitely not a pudding... I call it
    a waste of time, effort, and ingredients.

  7. #7
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    On May 18, 1:30*pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    > recipe. *I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    > * Have any of you? *I am going to type this in as it appears in
    > the book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the
    > source will follow).
    >
    > Apple Pudding
    > * *Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples
    > to make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    > * *Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    > * *Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking
    > dish. *Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    > * *Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful
    > ground cinnamon. *[JB: *I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to
    > mix the sugar and the cinnamon.]
    > * *Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    > * *Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    > butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    > * *Add a thrid layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing
    > off the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon
    > and sugar.
    > * *Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. *This makes a fine
    > flavor, but may be omitted if you prefer.
    > * *Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. *This makes
    > fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half
    > a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    > * *Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. *[JB: *At
    > first I was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but
    > one uses boiling water/liquid for that. *I like bold flavors, so I
    > am thinking I might use cider here.]
    > * *Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    > * *Serve hot. *Left over pudding is very good. *It may be served
    > cold and is nice for a school luncheon....
    >
    > Now paraphrasing... *One can use a total of a cup of raisins along
    > with the apples. *Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >
    > Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that
    > one wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish,
    > which is supposed to be buttered.
    >
    > Source: *Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. *Chicago:
    > Rand McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    Sort of like a multi-layered apple crisp/clafouti kinda thing. Except
    for the water - don't know why that's in there, since the juice from
    the apples as they cook seems to be plenty - and how would the
    "pudding" part ever get thick? Or is "pudding" the Brit term, meaning
    generally dessert? And what kind of crumbs?

    N.

  8. #8
    Nancy2 Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    >>> Serve hot.
    >
    > Don't know what that is but it's definitely not a pudding... I call it
    > a waste of time, effort, and ingredients.- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -



    It's sort of, "Why not just make apple crisp?" It's very tasty, and
    wouldn't take nearly as long to make. In addition, a crisp recipe
    could be turned into one with multiple layers if you wish.

    N.

  9. #9
    sf Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    On Thu, 19 May 2011 09:03:55 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Or is "pudding" the Brit term, meaning generally dessert?


    That one gets me every time too.


    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>> Jean B. wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >>>
    >>>> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    >>>> recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    >>>> Have any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the
    >>>> book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source
    >>>> will follow).
    >>>>
    >>>> Apple Pudding
    >>>> Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    >>>> make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit. Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread
    >>>> crumbs. Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered
    >>>> baking dish. Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs. Sprinkle over
    >>>> the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground cinnamon.
    >>>> [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar and the
    >>>> cinnamon.] Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter. Add
    >>>> another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs, butter,
    >>>> sugar, and cinnamon as before. Add a thrid layer, using the last
    >>>> cupful of apple and finishing off the top with the last third of the
    >>>> crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar. Now over the top drip the juice
    >>>> of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor, but may be omitted if you
    >>>> prefer. Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This
    >>>> makes fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use
    >>>> half a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    >>>> Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    >>>> was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses
    >>>> boiling water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking
    >>>> I might use cider here.] Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    >>>> Serve hot.

    >
    > Don't know what that is but it's definitely not a pudding... I call it
    > a waste of time, effort, and ingredients.


    None for you then.

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    Nancy2 wrote:
    > On May 18, 1:30 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    >> recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before.
    >> Have any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in
    >> the book, although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the
    >> source will follow).
    >>
    >> Apple Pudding
    >> Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples
    >> to make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    >> Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    >> Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking
    >> dish. Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    >> Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful
    >> ground cinnamon. [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to
    >> mix the sugar and the cinnamon.]
    >> Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    >> Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    >> butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    >> Add a thrid layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing
    >> off the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon
    >> and sugar.
    >> Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. This makes a fine
    >> flavor, but may be omitted if you prefer.
    >> Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This makes
    >> fairly sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half
    >> a cupful more or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    >> Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At
    >> first I was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but
    >> one uses boiling water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I
    >> am thinking I might use cider here.]
    >> Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    >> Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served
    >> cold and is nice for a school luncheon....
    >>
    >> Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along
    >> with the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >>
    >> Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that
    >> one wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish,
    >> which is supposed to be buttered.
    >>
    >> Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago:
    >> Rand McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > Sort of like a multi-layered apple crisp/clafouti kinda thing. Except
    > for the water - don't know why that's in there, since the juice from
    > the apples as they cook seems to be plenty - and how would the
    > "pudding" part ever get thick? Or is "pudding" the Brit term, meaning
    > generally dessert? And what kind of crumbs?
    >
    > N.


    Bread crumbs.

    --
    Jean B.

  12. #12
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    Nancy2 wrote:
    >>>> Serve hot.

    >> Don't know what that is but it's definitely not a pudding... I call it
    >> a waste of time, effort, and ingredients.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >
    > It's sort of, "Why not just make apple crisp?" It's very tasty, and
    > wouldn't take nearly as long to make. In addition, a crisp recipe
    > could be turned into one with multiple layers if you wish.
    >
    > N.


    Apple crisp may well be better than this, but that wouldn't
    satisfy my curiosity.

    --
    Jean B.

  13. #13
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    sf wrote:
    > On Thu, 19 May 2011 09:03:55 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Or is "pudding" the Brit term, meaning generally dessert?

    >
    > That one gets me every time too.
    >
    >

    This is a US cookbook, and not old, so I assume it is US usage.

    --
    Jean B.

  14. #14
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    but that wouldn't use the stale bread, think depression/poor use it up, Lee


    "Nancy2" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >>>> Serve hot.

    >>
    >> Don't know what that is but it's definitely not a pudding... I call it
    >> a waste of time, effort, and ingredients.- Hide quoted text -
    >>
    >> - Show quoted text -

    >
    >
    > It's sort of, "Why not just make apple crisp?" It's very tasty, and
    > wouldn't take nearly as long to make. In addition, a crisp recipe
    > could be turned into one with multiple layers if you wish.
    >
    > N.




  15. #15
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different)

    On May 19, 3:29*pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > sf wrote:
    > > On Thu, 19 May 2011 09:03:55 -0700 (PDT), Nancy2
    > > <nancy-doo...@uiowa.edu> wrote:

    >
    > >> Or is "pudding" the Brit term, meaning generally dessert?

    >
    > > That one gets me every time too.

    >
    > This is a US cookbook, and not old, so I assume it is US usage.
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    I would think it is a pudding in the same vein as a bread pudding just
    without the eggs. Lots of things were called puddings that weren't
    fluffy or cooked milk recipes.


  16. #16
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different), now TNT

    Jean B. wrote:
    > I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    > recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before. Have
    > any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the book,
    > although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source will follow).
    >
    > Apple Pudding
    > Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    > make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    > Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    > Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking dish.
    > Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    > Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground
    > cinnamon. [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar
    > and the cinnamon.]
    > Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    > Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    > butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    > Add a third layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing off
    > the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar.
    > Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor,
    > but may be omitted if you prefer.
    > Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This makes fairly
    > sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half a cupful more
    > or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    > Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    > was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses boiling
    > water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking I might
    > use cider here.]
    > Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    > Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served cold and
    > is nice for a school luncheon....
    >
    > Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along with
    > the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >
    > Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    > wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    > supposed to be buttered.
    >
    > Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago: Rand
    > McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.
    >


    I ended up being curious enough about this to make it. As I was
    assembling it, I started thinking it was not going to be very
    good. I used cortland apples, thinking they were flavorful, but
    the ones I used were not. I would therefore use a more sour apple
    the next time, or perhaps a mix of apple varieties. I used panko
    for the crumbs, because that was what was available. I have
    subsequently pondered graham cracker crumbs (crushed by moi--I
    really DO NOT like the flourlike crumbs that one can buy). My
    lemon was not that juicy, even though it seemed ro be a likely
    candidate for a good amount of juice (by that I mean ca 1/4). I
    did use cider. I deliberated on where to put this in the oven and
    ended up putting it near the bottom. I wanted it to be bubbling,
    but then realized it was not going to bubble like a pie would
    because of those crumbs. Oh yes. I started it in the turbo
    oven, and then that failed, so I switched it to the big oven, so I
    can't comment on the timing other than to say I think it was
    longer than the time given in the recipe.

    I continued to think this was not going to be that great, and
    eaten after it cooled a bit from the oven, it was not. I thought
    the flavor peaked the next day. By the second day after it was
    baked, some liquid had exuded, and it didn't seem to be as good.
    However, it was good enough on the second day to merit more
    tinkering. I kept thinking I'd add some other spices, maybe some
    nutmeg. As I said, I would use more-flavorful apples. I would
    use the cider or some other compatible beverage instead of water,
    and I'd make sure I had at least 1/4 c cup of lemon juice. I may
    try doing this with other sliceable fruits and may or may not try
    things like cherries. Oh! Now I am fantasizing about a cherry
    version.... Amaretti cookies... No!
    --
    Jean B.

  17. #17
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different), now TNT

    On May 28, 8:47*am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > Jean B. wrote:
    > > I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    > > recipe. *I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before. *Have
    > > any of you? *I am going to type this in as it appears in the book,
    > > although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source will follow).

    >
    > > Apple Pudding
    > > * Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    > > make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    > > * Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    > > * Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking dish.*
    > > Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    > > * Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground
    > > cinnamon. *[JB: *I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar
    > > and the cinnamon.]
    > > * Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    > > * Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    > > butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    > > * Add a third layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing off
    > > the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar.
    > > * Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. *This makes a fine flavor,
    > > but may be omitted if you prefer.
    > > * Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. *This makes fairly
    > > sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half a cupful more
    > > or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    > > * Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. *[JB: *At first I
    > > was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses boiling
    > > water/liquid for that. *I like bold flavors, so I am thinking I might
    > > use cider here.]
    > > * Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    > > * Serve hot. *Left over pudding is very good. *It may be served cold and
    > > is nice for a school luncheon....

    >
    > > Now paraphrasing... *One can use a total of a cup of raisins along with
    > > the apples. *Serve plain or with hard sauce.

    >
    > > Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    > > wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    > > supposed to be buttered.

    >
    > > Source: *Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. *Chicago: Rand
    > > McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.

    >
    > I ended up being curious enough about this to make it. *As I was
    > assembling it, I started thinking it was not going to be very
    > good. *I used cortland apples, thinking they were flavorful, but
    > the ones I used were not. *I would therefore use a more sour apple
    > the next time, or perhaps a mix of apple varieties. *I used panko
    > for the crumbs, because that was what was available. *I have
    > subsequently pondered graham cracker crumbs (crushed by moi--I
    > really DO NOT like the flourlike crumbs that one can buy). *My
    > lemon was not that juicy, even though it seemed ro be a likely
    > candidate for a good amount of juice (by that I mean ca 1/4). *I
    > did use cider. *I deliberated on where to put this in the oven and
    > ended up putting it near the bottom. *I wanted it to be bubbling,
    > but then realized it was not going to bubble like a pie would
    > because of those crumbs. * Oh yes. *I started it in the turbo
    > oven, and then that failed, so I switched it to the big oven, so I
    > can't comment on the timing other than to say I think it was
    > longer than the time given in the recipe.
    >
    > I continued to think this was not going to be that great, and
    > eaten after it cooled a bit from the oven, it was not. *I thought
    > the flavor peaked the next day. *By the second day after it was
    > baked, some liquid had exuded, and it didn't seem to be as good.
    > However, it was good enough on the second day to merit more
    > tinkering. *I kept thinking I'd add some other spices, maybe some
    > nutmeg. *As I said, I would use more-flavorful apples. *I would
    > use the cider or some other compatible beverage instead of water,
    > and I'd make sure I had at least 1/4 c cup of lemon juice. *I may
    > try doing this with other sliceable fruits and may or may not try
    > things like cherries. *Oh! *Now I am fantasizing about a cherry
    > version.... *Amaretti cookies... *No!
    > --
    > Jean B.


    ==
    Well, I do wish that you would arrive at an edible pudding before I
    starve. I've been patiently waiting.

    Yes, yes...try the cherries...might work.
    ==

  18. #18
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different), now TNT

    Roy wrote:
    > On May 28, 8:47 am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >> Jean B. wrote:
    >>> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    >>> recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before. Have
    >>> any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the book,
    >>> although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source will follow).
    >>> Apple Pudding
    >>> Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    >>> make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    >>> Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    >>> Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking dish.
    >>> Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    >>> Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground
    >>> cinnamon. [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar
    >>> and the cinnamon.]
    >>> Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    >>> Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    >>> butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    >>> Add a third layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing off
    >>> the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar.
    >>> Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor,
    >>> but may be omitted if you prefer.
    >>> Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This makes fairly
    >>> sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half a cupful more
    >>> or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    >>> Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    >>> was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses boiling
    >>> water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking I might
    >>> use cider here.]
    >>> Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    >>> Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served cold and
    >>> is nice for a school luncheon....
    >>> Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along with
    >>> the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >>> Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    >>> wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    >>> supposed to be buttered.
    >>> Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago: Rand
    >>> McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.

    >> I ended up being curious enough about this to make it. As I was
    >> assembling it, I started thinking it was not going to be very
    >> good. I used cortland apples, thinking they were flavorful, but
    >> the ones I used were not. I would therefore use a more sour apple
    >> the next time, or perhaps a mix of apple varieties. I used panko
    >> for the crumbs, because that was what was available. I have
    >> subsequently pondered graham cracker crumbs (crushed by moi--I
    >> really DO NOT like the flourlike crumbs that one can buy). My
    >> lemon was not that juicy, even though it seemed ro be a likely
    >> candidate for a good amount of juice (by that I mean ca 1/4). I
    >> did use cider. I deliberated on where to put this in the oven and
    >> ended up putting it near the bottom. I wanted it to be bubbling,
    >> but then realized it was not going to bubble like a pie would
    >> because of those crumbs. Oh yes. I started it in the turbo
    >> oven, and then that failed, so I switched it to the big oven, so I
    >> can't comment on the timing other than to say I think it was
    >> longer than the time given in the recipe.
    >>
    >> I continued to think this was not going to be that great, and
    >> eaten after it cooled a bit from the oven, it was not. I thought
    >> the flavor peaked the next day. By the second day after it was
    >> baked, some liquid had exuded, and it didn't seem to be as good.
    >> However, it was good enough on the second day to merit more
    >> tinkering. I kept thinking I'd add some other spices, maybe some
    >> nutmeg. As I said, I would use more-flavorful apples. I would
    >> use the cider or some other compatible beverage instead of water,
    >> and I'd make sure I had at least 1/4 c cup of lemon juice. I may
    >> try doing this with other sliceable fruits and may or may not try
    >> things like cherries. Oh! Now I am fantasizing about a cherry
    >> version.... Amaretti cookies... No!
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > ==
    > Well, I do wish that you would arrive at an edible pudding before I
    > starve. I've been patiently waiting.
    >
    > Yes, yes...try the cherries...might work.
    > ==


    Oh, this was edible. I am going to repeat it with a bit of
    tinkering. What type of thing are you thinking of?

    --
    Jean B.

  19. #19
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different), now TNT

    On May 28, 7:59*pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > Roy wrote:
    > > On May 28, 8:47 am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    > >> Jean B. wrote:
    > >>> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    > >>> recipe. *I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before. *Have
    > >>> any of you? *I am going to type this in as it appears in the book,
    > >>> although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source will follow).
    > >>> Apple Pudding
    > >>> * Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    > >>> make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    > >>> * Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    > >>> * Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking dish. *
    > >>> Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    > >>> * Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground
    > >>> cinnamon. *[JB: *I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar
    > >>> and the cinnamon.]
    > >>> * Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    > >>> * Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    > >>> butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    > >>> * Add a third layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing off
    > >>> the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar..
    > >>> * Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. *This makes a fine flavor,
    > >>> but may be omitted if you prefer.
    > >>> * Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. *This makes fairly
    > >>> sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half a cupful more
    > >>> or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    > >>> * Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. *[JB: *Atfirst I
    > >>> was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses boiling
    > >>> water/liquid for that. *I like bold flavors, so I am thinking I might
    > >>> use cider here.]
    > >>> * Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    > >>> * Serve hot. *Left over pudding is very good. *It may be servedcold and
    > >>> is nice for a school luncheon....
    > >>> Now paraphrasing... *One can use a total of a cup of raisins along with
    > >>> the apples. *Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    > >>> Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    > >>> wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    > >>> supposed to be buttered.
    > >>> Source: *Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. *Chicago: Rand
    > >>> McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.
    > >> I ended up being curious enough about this to make it. *As I was
    > >> assembling it, I started thinking it was not going to be very
    > >> good. *I used cortland apples, thinking they were flavorful, but
    > >> the ones I used were not. *I would therefore use a more sour apple
    > >> the next time, or perhaps a mix of apple varieties. *I used panko
    > >> for the crumbs, because that was what was available. *I have
    > >> subsequently pondered graham cracker crumbs (crushed by moi--I
    > >> really DO NOT like the flourlike crumbs that one can buy). *My
    > >> lemon was not that juicy, even though it seemed ro be a likely
    > >> candidate for a good amount of juice (by that I mean ca 1/4). *I
    > >> did use cider. *I deliberated on where to put this in the oven and
    > >> ended up putting it near the bottom. *I wanted it to be bubbling,
    > >> but then realized it was not going to bubble like a pie would
    > >> because of those crumbs. * Oh yes. *I started it in the turbo
    > >> oven, and then that failed, so I switched it to the big oven, so I
    > >> can't comment on the timing other than to say I think it was
    > >> longer than the time given in the recipe.

    >
    > >> I continued to think this was not going to be that great, and
    > >> eaten after it cooled a bit from the oven, it was not. *I thought
    > >> the flavor peaked the next day. *By the second day after it was
    > >> baked, some liquid had exuded, and it didn't seem to be as good.
    > >> However, it was good enough on the second day to merit more
    > >> tinkering. *I kept thinking I'd add some other spices, maybe some
    > >> nutmeg. *As I said, I would use more-flavorful apples. *I would
    > >> use the cider or some other compatible beverage instead of water,
    > >> and I'd make sure I had at least 1/4 c cup of lemon juice. *I may
    > >> try doing this with other sliceable fruits and may or may not try
    > >> things like cherries. *Oh! *Now I am fantasizing about a cherry
    > >> version.... *Amaretti cookies... *No!
    > >> --
    > >> Jean B.

    >
    > > ==
    > > Well, I do wish that you would arrive at an edible pudding before I
    > > starve. I've been patiently waiting.

    >
    > > Yes, yes...try the cherries...might work.
    > > ==

    >
    > Oh, this was edible. *I am going to repeat it with a bit of
    > tinkering. *What type *of thing are you thinking of?
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.


    ==
    Probably something with three layers...fruit, neutral or lightly
    flavored cake and a sauce which complements the fruit.
    ==

  20. #20
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: rec: Apple Pudding (different), now TNT

    Roy wrote:
    > On May 28, 7:59 pm, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >> Roy wrote:
    >>> On May 28, 8:47 am, "Jean B." <jb...@rcn.com> wrote:
    >>>> Jean B. wrote:
    >>>>> I am thumbing through some older books and found this interesting
    >>>>> recipe. I don't think I have seen anything quite like it before. Have
    >>>>> any of you? I am going to type this in as it appears in the book,
    >>>>> although it seems impossible to put parts in bf (the source will follow).
    >>>>> Apple Pudding
    >>>>> Wash, peel, core and cut into small slices enough enough apples to
    >>>>> make 3 cupfuls of sliced fruit.
    >>>>> Prepare 2 cupfuls of dry bread crumbs.
    >>>>> Arrannge 1 cupful of apple in the bottom of a buttered baking dish.
    >>>>> Sprinkle over this 2/3 cupful of crumbs.
    >>>>> Sprinkle over the crumbs 1/2 cupful sugar, and 1/2 teaspoonful ground
    >>>>> cinnamon. [JB: I'm sure all of us know it'd be best to mix the sugar
    >>>>> and the cinnamon.]
    >>>>> Drip over that 2 tablespoonfuls melted butter.
    >>>>> Add another layer of apples (1 cupful), and top it with crumbs,
    >>>>> butter, sugar, and cinnamon as before.
    >>>>> Add a third layer, using the last cupful of apple and finishing off
    >>>>> the top with the last third of the crumbs, butter, cinnamon and sugar.
    >>>>> Now over the top drip the juice of 1 lemon. This makes a fine flavor,
    >>>>> but may be omitted if you prefer.
    >>>>> Notice that you have used 1 1/2 cupfuls of sugar. This makes fairly
    >>>>> sweet pudding, but when you make it again you can use half a cupful more
    >>>>> or less if this is not exactly to your taste.
    >>>>> Pour 1 cupful of cold water over the whole pudding. [JB: At first I
    >>>>> was thinking this was going to make a pudding cake, but one uses boiling
    >>>>> water/liquid for that. I like bold flavors, so I am thinking I might
    >>>>> use cider here.]
    >>>>> Bake for one hour in a moderate oven.
    >>>>> Serve hot. Left over pudding is very good. It may be served cold and
    >>>>> is nice for a school luncheon....
    >>>>> Now paraphrasing... One can use a total of a cup of raisins along with
    >>>>> the apples. Serve plain or with hard sauce.
    >>>>> Also, in the rambling preface to the recipe, it is mentioned that one
    >>>>> wants to use a "rather flat" glass or earthen baking dish, which is
    >>>>> supposed to be buttered.
    >>>>> Source: Child Life Cook Book by Clara Ingram Judson. Chicago: Rand
    >>>>> McNally & Company, 1926, pp. 26-27.
    >>>> I ended up being curious enough about this to make it. As I was
    >>>> assembling it, I started thinking it was not going to be very
    >>>> good. I used cortland apples, thinking they were flavorful, but
    >>>> the ones I used were not. I would therefore use a more sour apple
    >>>> the next time, or perhaps a mix of apple varieties. I used panko
    >>>> for the crumbs, because that was what was available. I have
    >>>> subsequently pondered graham cracker crumbs (crushed by moi--I
    >>>> really DO NOT like the flourlike crumbs that one can buy). My
    >>>> lemon was not that juicy, even though it seemed ro be a likely
    >>>> candidate for a good amount of juice (by that I mean ca 1/4). I
    >>>> did use cider. I deliberated on where to put this in the oven and
    >>>> ended up putting it near the bottom. I wanted it to be bubbling,
    >>>> but then realized it was not going to bubble like a pie would
    >>>> because of those crumbs. Oh yes. I started it in the turbo
    >>>> oven, and then that failed, so I switched it to the big oven, so I
    >>>> can't comment on the timing other than to say I think it was
    >>>> longer than the time given in the recipe.
    >>>> I continued to think this was not going to be that great, and
    >>>> eaten after it cooled a bit from the oven, it was not. I thought
    >>>> the flavor peaked the next day. By the second day after it was
    >>>> baked, some liquid had exuded, and it didn't seem to be as good.
    >>>> However, it was good enough on the second day to merit more
    >>>> tinkering. I kept thinking I'd add some other spices, maybe some
    >>>> nutmeg. As I said, I would use more-flavorful apples. I would
    >>>> use the cider or some other compatible beverage instead of water,
    >>>> and I'd make sure I had at least 1/4 c cup of lemon juice. I may
    >>>> try doing this with other sliceable fruits and may or may not try
    >>>> things like cherries. Oh! Now I am fantasizing about a cherry
    >>>> version.... Amaretti cookies... No!
    >>>> --
    >>>> Jean B.
    >>> ==
    >>> Well, I do wish that you would arrive at an edible pudding before I
    >>> starve. I've been patiently waiting.
    >>> Yes, yes...try the cherries...might work.
    >>> ==

    >> Oh, this was edible. I am going to repeat it with a bit of
    >> tinkering. What type of thing are you thinking of?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jean B.

    >
    > ==
    > Probably something with three layers...fruit, neutral or lightly
    > flavored cake and a sauce which complements the fruit.
    > ==


    Ah, well, this doesn't have a sauce, so it isn't an avenue for you
    to take. Sorry.

    --
    Jean B.

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