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Thread: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

  1. #1
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    Mike Muth wrote:
    > Sausage Patties - an Amish Recipe
    > This is an impromptu sort of sausage, made as you need it. It's pretty
    > simple to make, tastes good, and is low-carb. You can make a pretty good
    > sausage gravy from this, too.
    > Serves 6.
    > 1 gram net carbs per serving.
    >
    > 1/2 lb lean ground pork
    > 1/2 lb fat ground pork
    > 1 tsp salt
    > 1/8 tsp pepper
    > pinch of sage
    > pinch of thyme
    > 1 beaten egg
    >
    > Mix the two kinds of pork.
    > Add the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.
    > Add the egg and mix well.
    > Mold into patties.
    > Fry until brown.
    >

    :-) I assume one COULD use a fattier ground pork. I thinking one
    could freeze portions of this. Would that be better before or
    after it has cooked? Or maybe after it is partially cooked?

    Have you ever made chorizo (the Mexican one)?

    --
    Jean B.

  2. #2
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On Jan 3, 7:24*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On Tue, 3 Jan 2012 08:37:33 -0600, Sqwertz wrote:
    > > On 3 Jan 2012 11:39:15 GMT, Mike Muth wrote:

    >
    > >> Sausage Patties - an Amish Recipe

    >
    > > Recipe stolen from:

    >
    > >http://www.countryfarm-lifestyles.co...h-recipes.html

    >
    > >> You can find my books at my Amazon.com author page:
    > >>http://tinyurl.com/695lgym

    >
    > > Blatant advertising also noted.

    >
    > That's OK, we'll just call you Stu II. *Another guy WE ran out of here
    > (along with his team of lawyers).
    >
    > I stand vindicated. *See how it all works out nicely in the end?
    >



    I used to think sqwertz was a person, but now he seems like a nym
    available for many people to use -- this seeming reply to himself
    being one giveaway.

  3. #3
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On Jan 3, 6:37*am, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On 3 Jan 2012 11:39:15 GMT, Mike Muth wrote:
    >
    > > Sausage Patties - an Amish Recipe

    >
    > Recipe stolen from:
    >
    > http://www.countryfarm-lifestyles.co...h-recipes.html
    >


    That website seems to be a content harvester site, like eHow.com. But
    Muth makes no pretense that the recipe is his own: I think the "Amish"
    in the title would be a tipoff. (I assume the technology-eschewing
    Amish do not use the internet.)

  4. #4
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On Jan 3, 3:39*am, Mike Muth <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    > Sausage Patties - an Amish Recipe
    > This is an impromptu sort of sausage, made as you need it. *It's pretty
    > simple to make, tastes good, and is low-carb. *You can make a pretty good
    > sausage gravy from this, too.
    > Serves 6.
    > 1 gram net carbs per serving.
    >
    > 1/2 lb lean ground pork
    > 1/2 lb fat ground pork
    > 1 tsp salt
    > 1/8 tsp pepper
    > pinch of sage
    > pinch of thyme
    > 1 beaten egg
    >
    > Mix the two kinds of pork.
    > Add the dry ingredients and mix thoroughly.
    > Add the egg and mix well.
    > Mold into patties.
    > Fry until brown.
    >


    What did you use for the lean ground pork and the fat ground pork? My
    local store sells just one kind of ground pork. I would be tempted
    just to grind up a pork butt and call it a day.

  5. #5
    Keith Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties


    "Mike Muth" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 3 Jan 2012 16:52:05 GMT, Mike Muth wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>> <snip>
    >>>
    >>>> That's OK, we'll just call you Stu II. Another guy WE ran out of
    >>>> here (along with his team of lawyers).
    >>>>
    >>>> I stand vindicated. See how it all works out nicely in the end?
    >>>
    >>> Such a charming person you are.

    >
    >>> Even your lies and false accusations will not "run me out of here".
    >>> Did you know that, under Canadian law, I can sue you for that false
    >>> accusation.

    >
    >> Stu was from Canada, too, wasn't he? <snork>

    >
    > But I'm not.
    >
    >> Nothing I said was untrue. But even if it was, go ahead and sue me,
    >> buddy!

    >
    > That "stolen" bit and saying that I got the recipe from a web site.
    >
    > As I said, I'm not going to sue. I have no interest in suing. Even if
    > I did, it violates my religious principles.
    >
    >>> I'm simply pointing that out lest
    >>> your childishness cause another person to take you to court.

    >>
    >> If I had a dime for....

    >
    > Every time someone called you childish, you'd be in the 1%.
    >
    > --
    > Mike
    > Visit my forums at:
    > http://www.facebook.com/groups/mikes.place.bar/
    > http://groups.google.com/group/mikes-place1/topics
    > http://forums.delphiforums.com/mikes_place1/start
    > You can find my books at my Amazon.com author page:
    > http://tinyurl.com/695lgym


    Why are you arguing with Squertz? It's pointless. Just follow the lead of
    most and killfile the idiot.



  6. #6
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mike Muth <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Such links in one's sig are well within RFC 1855 (standards document
    > which you likely have never seen). This does not constitute
    > advertising. It's an informational link.


    I have no dog in this hunt other than your referral to RFC 1855. You are
    aware that sigs in that RFC are recommended as no more than four lines
    long, right? That has become the solid convention.
    <http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1855.html>
    If you doubt me, try any of the computer language groups with your sig.
    They will hand you your ass in pieces. Try comp.lang.c to start with.
    Only quote RFCs that you know entirely or know you're completely in
    compliance thereof.
    Of course, I could be wrong.

    leo

  7. #7
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On Jan 3, 4:55*pm, Mike Muth <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:
    > "Keith" <kblak...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    > > Why are you arguing with Squertz? * It's pointless. *Just follow the
    > > lead of most and killfile the idiot.

    >
    > You're right. *I'll refrain from killfiling at this point. *But I will be
    > responding to his trolls much less often.
    >
    > Obfood: *Back in the 1920s to 1950s, many small church groups, families,
    > community groups, and even small towns worked together to publish small
    > cookbooks. *These cookbooks mainly sold to the group which sponsored them.
    >
    > Now, decades later, these often-ignored books contain a wealth of insights
    > into the cooking and eating habits of those groups. *They also provide some
    > pretty good recipes. *You just have to watch out for changing can or
    > package sizes.
    >
    > --
    > Mike
    > Visit my forums at:http://www.facebook.com/groups/mikes...s_place1/start
    > You can find my books at my Amazon.com author page: *http://tinyurl.com/695lgym


    I have a great cookbook put out by the Harmony School in Occidental,
    CA form the early 60's. There were a lot of Italians that settled
    there, so I have some great recipes thanks to that publication!

  8. #8
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On 1/3/2012 6:55 PM, Mike Muth wrote:
    > "Keith"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Why are you arguing with Squertz? It's pointless. Just follow the
    >> lead of most and killfile the idiot.

    >
    > You're right. I'll refrain from killfiling at this point. But I will be
    > responding to his trolls much less often.
    >
    > Obfood: Back in the 1920s to 1950s, many small church groups, families,
    > community groups, and even small towns worked together to publish small
    > cookbooks. These cookbooks mainly sold to the group which sponsored them.
    >
    > Now, decades later, these often-ignored books contain a wealth of insights
    > into the cooking and eating habits of those groups. They also provide some
    > pretty good recipes. You just have to watch out for changing can or
    > package sizes.
    >


    About 12 years ago, I put together a very large group cruise (400+
    people from all over the US and Canada). I asked everyone in the group
    to send in a favorite recipe, with an eye of choosing one that was
    regional to where they lived. We got about 175 recipes.

    It was hugely popular. Hmmm I ought to do that again.

    George L

  9. #9
    merryb Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On Jan 4, 6:28*am, George Leppla <geo...@cruisemaster.com> wrote:
    > On 1/3/2012 6:55 PM, Mike Muth wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > "Keith"<kblak...@hotmail.com> *wrote:

    >
    > > <snip>

    >
    > >> Why are you arguing with Squertz? * It's pointless. *Just follow the
    > >> lead of most and killfile the idiot.

    >
    > > You're right. *I'll refrain from killfiling at this point. *But I will be
    > > responding to his trolls much less often.

    >
    > > Obfood: *Back in the 1920s to 1950s, many small church groups, families,
    > > community groups, and even small towns worked together to publish small
    > > cookbooks. *These cookbooks mainly sold to the group which sponsored them.

    >
    > > Now, decades later, these often-ignored books contain a wealth of insights
    > > into the cooking and eating habits of those groups. *They also provide some
    > > pretty good recipes. *You just have to watch out for changing can or
    > > package sizes.

    >
    > About 12 years ago, I put together a very large group cruise (400+
    > people from all over the US and Canada). I asked everyone in the group
    > to send in a favorite recipe, with an eye of choosing one that was
    > regional to where they lived. We got about 175 recipes.
    >
    > It was hugely popular. *Hmmm I ought to do that again.
    >
    > George L


    What a fun idea, especially if the recipes are good!

  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Old Recipe Books was: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    Mike Muth wrote:
    > merryb <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Jan 3, 4:55 pm, Mike Muth <m...@unverbesserlich.net> wrote:

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>> Obfood: Back in the 1920s to 1950s, many small church groups,
    >>> families, community groups, and even small towns worked together to
    >>> publish small cookbooks. These cookbooks mainly sold to the group
    >>> which sponsored them.
    >>>
    >>> Now, decades later, these often-ignored books contain a wealth of
    >>> insights into the cooking and eating habits of those groups. They
    >>> also provide some pretty good recipes. You just have to watch out
    >>> for changing can or package sizes.

    >
    >> I have a great cookbook put out by the Harmony School in Occidental,
    >> CA form the early 60's. There were a lot of Italians that settled
    >> there, so I have some great recipes thanks to that publication!

    >
    > I have one from Otis, Kansas (date unknown) which has a a load of our
    > family recipies in it. It seems like every aunt of mine had half a dozen
    > recipes in the book. There are a bunch of other good recipes, as well.
    >
    > It is the source of many of my "Kansas-German" recipes.
    >
    > This phenomenon didn't seem to happen in Germany, for a number of
    > reasons. So, my wife's family didn't produce or participate in such a
    > cornucopia of recipes. Still, I have a large block of German recipes,
    > too (close to 200).
    >
    > The Mennonite community here has produced, and continues to produce,
    > such cookbooks. These are mainly from extended families. I mean LARGE
    > extended families, so the books have a large number of such recipes.
    >
    > While I was working or stationed in Europe (Total of nearly 20 years), I
    > travelled to countries around the Med and adjoining Germany. I didn't
    > see anything like those old church/community cookbooks. I did get a
    > bunch of good recipes and tried a lot of good food, though.
    >
    >

    It's cool that that Otis, Kansas cookbook contains so many of your
    family's recipes. Those books really run the gamut, IMO. There
    are those that seem to have the same recipes that one sees in most
    other such books, and then there are others that actually contain
    treasured heirloom recipes and concentrate on regional cooking.
    The former don't interest me at all.

    --
    Jean B.

  11. #11
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Old Recipe Books was: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    Mike Muth wrote:
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> It's cool that that Otis, Kansas cookbook contains so many of your
    >> family's recipes. Those books really run the gamut, IMO. There
    >> are those that seem to have the same recipes that one sees in most
    >> other such books, and then there are others that actually contain
    >> treasured heirloom recipes and concentrate on regional cooking.
    >> The former don't interest me at all.

    >
    > What makes the Otis cookbook (actually it's from the Methodist church which
    > my great-grandfather helped found there) so interesting to me is that it
    > contains the recipes my grandmother used to use when she lived in our
    > house. There are a couple of others I have on copies of recipe cards, but
    > the best ones are in here - usually under her sister-in-law's name.
    >

    That's wonderful. I searched and searched for one of my maternal
    grandmother's recipes for years. How easy this would have been if
    she had contributed that to such a book (assuming we had a copy of
    the book, of course). Ironically, I only have a few of her
    recipes, and she was a very good cook. BUT I have my paternal
    grandmother's recipe notebook, and she was reputed to be a very
    bad cook. (She died the year I was born, so I have no personal
    recollection of this.)

    --
    Jean B.

  12. #12
    Cheri Guest

    Default Re: Old Recipe Books was: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Mike Muth wrote:
    >> "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> <snip>
    >>
    >>> It's cool that that Otis, Kansas cookbook contains so many of your
    >>> family's recipes. Those books really run the gamut, IMO. There are
    >>> those that seem to have the same recipes that one sees in most other
    >>> such books, and then there are others that actually contain treasured
    >>> heirloom recipes and concentrate on regional cooking. The former don't
    >>> interest me at all.

    >>
    >> What makes the Otis cookbook (actually it's from the Methodist church
    >> which my great-grandfather helped found there) so interesting to me is
    >> that it contains the recipes my grandmother used to use when she lived in
    >> our house. There are a couple of others I have on copies of recipe
    >> cards, but the best ones are in here - usually under her sister-in-law's
    >> name.

    > That's wonderful. I searched and searched for one of my maternal
    > grandmother's recipes for years. How easy this would have been if she had
    > contributed that to such a book (assuming we had a copy of the book, of
    > course). Ironically, I only have a few of her recipes, and she was a very
    > good cook. BUT I have my paternal grandmother's recipe notebook, and she
    > was reputed to be a very bad cook. (She died the year I was born, so I
    > have no personal recollection of this.)
    >
    > --
    > Jean B.



    Have you tried e-bay? I was able to find an old church cookbook from Walla
    Walla WA there, with recipes from relatives of my good friend. I gave it to
    her and she was thrilled. Maybe by putting in your grandmother's hometown
    and searching for cookbooks would work. Just a thought.

    Cheri


  13. #13
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    Mike Muth <[email protected]> wrote:
    > "Jean B." <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Mike Muth wrote:

    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> :-) I assume one COULD use a fattier ground pork. I thinking one
    >> could freeze portions of this. Would that be better before or
    >> after it has cooked? Or maybe after it is partially cooked?

    >
    > Well, IME, ground pork tends to be a bit fatty anyway. A fattier pork
    > would produce more fat with which to make gravy, cook eggs, and such.
    >
    > You could certainly freeze it. If it has been standing out a bit, I'd
    > cook it first. I wouldn't partially cook it since that likely
    > wouldn't kill the bacteria effectively and the half-cooked meat could
    > provide a growth medium before the meat froze.
    >
    > If you freeze it, be sure to freeze some of the drippings with it.
    > That way, you can use that fat to keep it from drying out when you
    > re-heat it.
    >
    > What I've done is to crumble some of it rather than molding it into
    > patties. Then, I'll freez that (with the melted fat) and re-use it
    > later for sausage gravy.
    >
    >> Have you ever made chorizo (the Mexican one)?

    >
    > No. Nor have I eaten any. I have had the Portuguese equivalent,
    > chourišo. The Spanish and Portuguese sausages tend to be less spicy
    > since they aren't made with chili peppers. The use of smoked red
    > peppers also gives the Ibernian sausages a smokier flavor. Spanish
    > Chorizo also uses white wine were that made in the Americas uses
    > vinegar.


    Actually Mexican and Spanish chorizo are drastically different. Mexican
    chorizo is fresh sausage. Spanish chorizo is a cured smoked sausage. Huge
    difference.

    MartyB



  14. #14
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    Leonard Blaisdell <[email protected]> wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mike Muth <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Such links in one's sig are well within RFC 1855 (standards document
    >> which you likely have never seen). This does not constitute
    >> advertising. It's an informational link.

    >
    > I have no dog in this hunt other than your referral to RFC 1855. You
    > are aware that sigs in that RFC are recommended as no more than four
    > lines long, right? That has become the solid convention.
    > <http://www.faqs.org/rfcs/rfc1855.html>
    > If you doubt me, try any of the computer language groups with your
    > sig. They will hand you your ass in pieces. Try comp.lang.c to start
    > with. Only quote RFCs that you know entirely or know you're
    > completely in compliance thereof.
    > Of course, I could be wrong.
    >
    > leo


    Spank!



  15. #15
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On 1/3/2012 8:08 AM, Mike Muth wrote:
    >
    > No. Nor have I eaten any. I have had the Portuguese equivalent,
    > chourišo. The Spanish and Portuguese sausages tend to be less spicy
    > since they aren't made with chili peppers. The use of smoked red peppers
    > also gives the Ibernian sausages a smokier flavor. Spanish Chorizo also
    > uses white wine were that made in the Americas uses vinegar.


    Hawaii is crazy about Portuguese sausage - we can get it at McDonalds
    and Jack in the Box. Personally, I'm getting sick of the stuff. :-)

    Chorizo I like but it's hard to get them here. Hawaii needs more
    Mexicans! I like a heavy cumin flavored sausage that's slice-able but
    not dried and hard.

  16. #16
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 12:01:15 -1000, dsi1
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 1/3/2012 8:08 AM, Mike Muth wrote:
    >>
    >> No. Nor have I eaten any. I have had the Portuguese equivalent,
    >> chourišo. The Spanish and Portuguese sausages tend to be less spicy
    >> since they aren't made with chili peppers. The use of smoked red peppers
    >> also gives the Ibernian sausages a smokier flavor. Spanish Chorizo also
    >> uses white wine were that made in the Americas uses vinegar.

    >
    >Hawaii is crazy about Portuguese sausage - we can get it at McDonalds
    >and Jack in the Box. Personally, I'm getting sick of the stuff. :-)
    >
    >Chorizo I like but it's hard to get them here. Hawaii needs more
    >Mexicans! I like a heavy cumin flavored sausage that's slice-able but
    >not dried and hard.


    Real Hawiians would choose SPAM over chorizo every time.

  17. #17
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On 1/4/2012 12:20 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    > On Wed, 04 Jan 2012 12:01:15 -1000, dsi1
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 1/3/2012 8:08 AM, Mike Muth wrote:
    >>>
    >>> No. Nor have I eaten any. I have had the Portuguese equivalent,
    >>> chourišo. The Spanish and Portuguese sausages tend to be less spicy
    >>> since they aren't made with chili peppers. The use of smoked red peppers
    >>> also gives the Ibernian sausages a smokier flavor. Spanish Chorizo also
    >>> uses white wine were that made in the Americas uses vinegar.

    >>
    >> Hawaii is crazy about Portuguese sausage - we can get it at McDonalds
    >> and Jack in the Box. Personally, I'm getting sick of the stuff. :-)
    >>
    >> Chorizo I like but it's hard to get them here. Hawaii needs more
    >> Mexicans! I like a heavy cumin flavored sausage that's slice-able but
    >> not dried and hard.

    >
    > Real Hawiians would choose SPAM over chorizo every time.


    I suspect it's evenly divided but I'm a romantic and don't really want
    to really know. After all, we built this city on Spam. OTOH, there's no
    reason why Spam and Port. Sausage can't live together in harmony.

    http://consumerist.com/2007/06/burge...literally.html

  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    dsi1 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > I suspect it's evenly divided but I'm a romantic and don't really want
    > to really know. After all, we built this city on Spam. OTOH, there's
    > no reason why Spam and Port. Sausage can't live together in harmony.
    >


    There's a song there somewhere...



  19. #19
    dsi1 Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On 1/4/2012 1:38 PM, Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > dsi1<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> I suspect it's evenly divided but I'm a romantic and don't really want
    >> to really know. After all, we built this city on Spam. OTOH, there's
    >> no reason why Spam and Port. Sausage can't live together in harmony.
    >>

    >
    > There's a song there somewhere...
    >
    >

    Well, I know there's some maps on every can of Spam.

  20. #20
    Cheryl Guest

    Default Re: REC: Amish Sausage Patties

    On 1/3/2012 10:40 PM, merryb wrote:
    > I have a great cookbook put out by the Harmony School in Occidental,
    > CA form the early 60's. There were a lot of Italians that settled
    > there, so I have some great recipes thanks to that publication!


    I have two cookbooks with recipes contributed by a diverse group of
    employees a two different companies I've worked for. Some are very
    ordinary recipes, but others are interesting. I haven't seen either of
    those books in years and must look for them!


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