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Thread: Really yellow gravy

  1. #1
    Myrl Jeffcoat Guest

    Default Really yellow gravy

    I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    Dutch food.

    One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    possibilities.

    Myrl Jeffcoat

  2. #2
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy


    "Myrl Jeffcoat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    turmeric or curry would be the first thing that comes to mind. Or maybe food
    coloring, either on it's own or part of another ingredient (like a chicken base).

    kimberly


  3. #3
    Nexis Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy


    "Myrl Jeffcoat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    turmeric or curry would be the first thing that comes to mind. Or maybe food
    coloring, either on it's own or part of another ingredient (like a chicken base).

    kimberly


  4. #4
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.


    Did it taste different than the hot turkey sandwiches from your past?
    Restaurant style hot turkey sandwiches from my past are one of my
    fondest memories. The gravy color was generally rich tan.
    Hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches seem to be things of the past.
    What a misfortune!

    leo

  5. #5
    Leonard Blaisdell Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.


    Did it taste different than the hot turkey sandwiches from your past?
    Restaurant style hot turkey sandwiches from my past are one of my
    fondest memories. The gravy color was generally rich tan.
    Hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches seem to be things of the past.
    What a misfortune!

    leo

  6. #6
    Myrl Jeffcoat Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On May 13, 11:55*pm, Leonard Blaisdell <leoblaisd...@sbcglobal.net>
    wrote:

    > Did it taste different than the hot turkey sandwiches from your past?
    > Restaurant style hot turkey sandwiches from my past are one of my
    > fondest memories. The gravy color was generally rich tan.
    > Hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches seem to be things of the past.
    > What a misfortune!
    >
    > leo



    Leo - The hot turkey sandwiches I remember also had a light tan
    color. But this gravy was distinctly more golden yellow (almost maise
    colored). The flavor was a tad more savory.

    I noted several places like this one in the Pennsylvania area. They
    have the title, "DINER" but usually have an individual's name to
    preface that. I suspect they are franchises, that have a slightly
    1950ish look and feel to them. This one In Lancaster County, boasted
    Pennsylvania Dutch cooking.

    Myrl Jeffcoat

  7. #7
    Myrl Jeffcoat Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On May 13, 11:55*pm, Leonard Blaisdell <leoblaisd...@sbcglobal.net>
    wrote:

    > Did it taste different than the hot turkey sandwiches from your past?
    > Restaurant style hot turkey sandwiches from my past are one of my
    > fondest memories. The gravy color was generally rich tan.
    > Hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches seem to be things of the past.
    > What a misfortune!
    >
    > leo



    Leo - The hot turkey sandwiches I remember also had a light tan
    color. But this gravy was distinctly more golden yellow (almost maise
    colored). The flavor was a tad more savory.

    I noted several places like this one in the Pennsylvania area. They
    have the title, "DINER" but usually have an individual's name to
    preface that. I suspect they are franchises, that have a slightly
    1950ish look and feel to them. This one In Lancaster County, boasted
    Pennsylvania Dutch cooking.

    Myrl Jeffcoat

  8. #8
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On Tue 13 May 2008 09:56:02p, Myrl Jeffcoat told us...

    > I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    I doubt it was turmeric. Any significant amount of that would be
    pronounced in the flavor. The same for curry powder. You would notice.
    Some commercial chicken/turkey stock bases have a decidedly yellow color to
    them. I don't know if it's artificial, but I have seen yellowish gravy in
    places before.

    Traditionally, a poultry gravy would range from light tan to bordering on
    brown.

    I experienced something similar with another food and still have never
    figured it out. There was a favorite breakfast place back in OH that
    served delicious pancakes. When you cut into the pancake, it was decidedly
    yellow in color. I asked the owner about them and he said they used a mix,
    but didn't tell me the brand or where it came from. They were excellent
    pancakes, but I'll never figure out the color. :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, 05(V)/14(XIV)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 4dys 18hrs 20mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I am the girl-next-door's imaginary
    boyfriend.
    -------------------------------------------


  9. #9
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On Tue 13 May 2008 09:56:02p, Myrl Jeffcoat told us...

    > I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    I doubt it was turmeric. Any significant amount of that would be
    pronounced in the flavor. The same for curry powder. You would notice.
    Some commercial chicken/turkey stock bases have a decidedly yellow color to
    them. I don't know if it's artificial, but I have seen yellowish gravy in
    places before.

    Traditionally, a poultry gravy would range from light tan to bordering on
    brown.

    I experienced something similar with another food and still have never
    figured it out. There was a favorite breakfast place back in OH that
    served delicious pancakes. When you cut into the pancake, it was decidedly
    yellow in color. I asked the owner about them and he said they used a mix,
    but didn't tell me the brand or where it came from. They were excellent
    pancakes, but I'll never figure out the color. :-)

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, 05(V)/14(XIV)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 4dys 18hrs 20mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I am the girl-next-door's imaginary
    boyfriend.
    -------------------------------------------


  10. #10
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On Tue 13 May 2008 11:55:10p, Leonard Blaisdell told us...

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    >> The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    >> but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    >> guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    >> if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    >> possibilities.

    >
    > Did it taste different than the hot turkey sandwiches from your past?
    > Restaurant style hot turkey sandwiches from my past are one of my
    > fondest memories. The gravy color was generally rich tan.
    > Hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches seem to be things of the past.
    > What a misfortune!
    >
    > leo


    Back in the 1950s, even dimestores and drugstores with a sandwich bar
    served rather good hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches. It is sad
    that they're a thing of the past.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, 05(V)/14(XIV)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 4dys 18hrs 15mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Oxymoron: Smart Bomb.
    -------------------------------------------



  11. #11
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On Tue 13 May 2008 11:55:10p, Leonard Blaisdell told us...

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    >> The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    >> but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    >> guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    >> if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    >> possibilities.

    >
    > Did it taste different than the hot turkey sandwiches from your past?
    > Restaurant style hot turkey sandwiches from my past are one of my
    > fondest memories. The gravy color was generally rich tan.
    > Hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches seem to be things of the past.
    > What a misfortune!
    >
    > leo


    Back in the 1950s, even dimestores and drugstores with a sandwich bar
    served rather good hot turkey and hot roast beef sandwiches. It is sad
    that they're a thing of the past.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Wednesday, 05(V)/14(XIV)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 4dys 18hrs 15mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Oxymoron: Smart Bomb.
    -------------------------------------------



  12. #12
    jay Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On Tue, 13 May 2008 21:56:02 -0700 (PDT), Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

    > I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    It is probably Amish butter gravy.

    jay

  13. #13
    jay Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    On Tue, 13 May 2008 21:56:02 -0700 (PDT), Myrl Jeffcoat wrote:

    > I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    It is probably Amish butter gravy.

    jay

  14. #14
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy


    "Myrl Jeffcoat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    I'm guessing butter, and plenty of it. Somehow I can't see turmeric being
    used in Pennsylvania Dutch kitchens!

    And oh, those wonderful hot turkey/chicken and gravy sandwiches of bygone
    days ...

    Felice



  15. #15
    Felice Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy


    "Myrl Jeffcoat" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.
    >
    > Myrl Jeffcoat


    I'm guessing butter, and plenty of it. Somehow I can't see turmeric being
    used in Pennsylvania Dutch kitchens!

    And oh, those wonderful hot turkey/chicken and gravy sandwiches of bygone
    days ...

    Felice



  16. #16
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is probably Amish butter gravy.


    Did you just pick that term out of your ass, or what?

    -sw

  17. #17
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    jay <[email protected]> wrote:

    > It is probably Amish butter gravy.


    Did you just pick that term out of your ass, or what?

    -sw

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.


    Turkey Devonshire (Open faced turkey sandwich with sauce) is very
    common there in central Pennsylvania. It's a basic white sauce with
    cheese and turkey/chicken stock added.

    Otherwise I'd guess it was just made with chicken bouillon if you
    don't think there was any cheese in it.

    -sw

  19. #19
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have just returned home from a delightful trip to Amish country in
    > Lancaster PA. While there I filled up on wonderful Amish/Pennsylvania
    > Dutch food.
    >
    > One of the best meals was a simple hot turkey sandwich, with gravy.
    > The gravy seemed fairly traditional or usual for that kind of meal,
    > but was more "golden" yellow than I've seen in the past. What do you
    > guys think may have been the ingredient to make that so? I wondered
    > if a bit of tumeric had been added, but also wonder if there are other
    > possibilities.


    Turkey Devonshire (Open faced turkey sandwich with sauce) is very
    common there in central Pennsylvania. It's a basic white sauce with
    cheese and turkey/chicken stock added.

    Otherwise I'd guess it was just made with chicken bouillon if you
    don't think there was any cheese in it.

    -sw

  20. #20
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Really yellow gravy

    Myrl Jeffcoat <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I noted several places like this one in the Pennsylvania area. They
    > have the title, "DINER" but usually have an individual's name to
    > preface that. I suspect they are franchises, that have a slightly
    > 1950ish look and feel to them. This one In Lancaster County, boasted
    > Pennsylvania Dutch cooking.


    Again, a Turkey Devonshire is classic PA diner food. Was there
    bacon under/over the turkey?

    -sw

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