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Thread: Real cost of food after preparation

  1. #1
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Real cost of food after preparation

    Hello All!

    I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh store-bought
    fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated the real cost of other
    foods, particularly vegetables? I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods themselves and
    how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?

    Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is trout where
    the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I don't trust any fish
    seller displaying trout filets ("for your convenience" or so you can't
    see the eyes.)

    --


    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations:
    not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  2. #2
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation


    James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > Hello All!
    >
    > I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh store-bought
    > fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated the real cost of other
    > foods, particularly vegetables?


    > I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    > wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods themselves


    Buy snap or snow peas where the only waste is the tiny bit of stem.

    > and
    > how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?


    That depends on how frugal you are. I trim the very bottom 1/8" or so
    which is dried out, and then I trim the nice tender upper part from the
    remainder. The parts all go in the steamer, and when the upper parts are
    done they come out and are eaten as meal one. The tougher lower parts
    steam a bit longer, and are then made into cream of asparagus soup for
    meal two. Total waste is very minimal.

    >
    > Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is trout where
    > the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I don't trust any fish
    > seller displaying trout filets ("for your convenience" or so you can't
    > see the eyes.)


    Well, since most of that trout is farm raised and was frozen, the
    fillets are just fine.

  3. #3
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Pete wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 10:01:48 -0500:


    > James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >> Hello All!
    >>
    >> I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh
    >> store-bought fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated
    >> the real cost of other foods, particularly vegetables?


    >> I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    >> wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods
    >> themselves


    > Buy snap or snow peas where the only waste is the tiny bit of
    > stem.


    >> and
    >> how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?


    > That depends on how frugal you are. I trim the very bottom
    > 1/8" or so which is dried out, and then I trim the nice tender
    > upper part from the remainder. The parts all go in the
    > steamer, and when the upper parts are done they come out and
    > are eaten as meal one. The tougher lower parts steam a bit
    > longer, and are then made into cream of asparagus soup for
    > meal two. Total waste is very minimal.


    >> Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is
    >> trout where the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I
    >> don't trust any fish seller displaying trout filets ("for
    >> your convenience" or so you can't see the eyes.)


    >:Well, since most of that trout is farm raised and was frozen, the
    >fillets are just fine.


    You are obviously more frugal than me to use trimmings as you do and
    while, snow peas are fine in their place, I just buy frozen little peas,
    which are quite satisfactory. My experience with the freshness of trout
    filets has not been very satisfactory and the deboned trout that I buy
    has not been frozen. I like to broil trout in its skin and there is then
    little chance of overcooking.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  4. #4
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    On Tue, 25 May 2010 11:14:33 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Pete wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 10:01:48 -0500:
    >
    >
    >> James Silverton wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Hello All!
    >>>
    >>> I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh
    >>> store-bought fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated
    >>> the real cost of other foods, particularly vegetables?

    >
    >>> I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    >>> wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods
    >>> themselves

    >
    >> Buy snap or snow peas where the only waste is the tiny bit of
    >> stem.

    >
    >>> and
    >>> how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?

    >
    >> That depends on how frugal you are. I trim the very bottom
    >> 1/8" or so which is dried out, and then I trim the nice tender
    >> upper part from the remainder. The parts all go in the
    >> steamer, and when the upper parts are done they come out and
    >> are eaten as meal one. The tougher lower parts steam a bit
    >> longer, and are then made into cream of asparagus soup for
    >> meal two. Total waste is very minimal.

    >
    >>> Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is
    >>> trout where the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I
    >>> don't trust any fish seller displaying trout filets ("for
    >>> your convenience" or so you can't see the eyes.)

    >
    >>:Well, since most of that trout is farm raised and was frozen, the
    >>fillets are just fine.

    >
    >You are obviously more frugal than me to use trimmings as you do and
    >while, snow peas are fine in their place, I just buy frozen little peas,
    >which are quite satisfactory. My experience with the freshness of trout
    >filets has not been very satisfactory and the deboned trout that I buy
    >has not been frozen. I like to broil trout in its skin and there is then
    >little chance of overcooking.


    Trout in a cast iron frying pan over an open fire, butter, salt/pepper
    is nothing better. Broil is second best.

  5. #5
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    On May 25, 7:26*am, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net>
    wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh store-bought
    > fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated the real cost of other
    > foods, particularly vegetables? I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    > wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods themselves and
    > how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?
    >


    What puzzles me is why is chicken cheaper than vegetables? Vegetables
    used to be cheaper, right?(Other than potatoes) I know there is
    wastage because of the bones, but still.

    I peel the butts of the asparagus. If it is green and tender, it all
    goes in. My wife snaps the butts and discards them, but usually the
    top half of the butts (if that makes sense) is edible.

  6. #6
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Then after eating it isn't worth ****. Oh, wait, yes it is.

    --Bryan

  7. #7
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote

    What puzzles me is why is chicken cheaper than vegetables? Vegetables
    used to be cheaper, right?(Other than potatoes) I know there is
    wastage because of the bones, but still.

    **************************************************
    Meat in the US is really very cheap. That does not mean it is good though.
    Pork and chicken are raised in factories, not farms, and the process is
    rather streamlined getting it from live animal to the table.

    A fellow I know is doing some work for a pork producer. The facility he is
    at slaughters 18,000 hogs per 10 hour day, six days a week. It is just
    minutes from the live truck in to the finished product being trucked out.



  8. #8
    Dan Goodman Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    James Silverton wrote:

    > Hello All!
    >
    > I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh
    > store-bought fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated the real
    > cost of other foods, particularly vegetables? I don't eat fresh green
    > peas often but I wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the
    > pods themselves and how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking
    > it?
    >
    > Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is trout
    > where the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I don't trust any
    > fish seller displaying trout filets ("for your convenience" or so you
    > can't see the eyes.)


    You also need to include the cost of the extra time you spend on
    preparation and shopping.

    --
    Dan Goodman
    "I have always depended on the kindness of stranglers."
    Tennessee Williams, A Streetcar Named Expire
    Journal dsgood.dreamwidth.org (livejournal.com, insanejournal.com)

  9. #9
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    spamtrap1888 wrote:

    >
    > What puzzles me is why is chicken cheaper than vegetables? Vegetables
    > used to be cheaper, right?(Other than potatoes) I know there is
    > wastage because of the bones, but still.
    >




    Possibly because we eat vegetables from another hemisphere for half the
    year? If you consider what is not available "fresh" grown in the U.S.
    during the winter, we'd be living on canned or frozen for six months
    but we choose to eat asparagus, broccoli, tomatoes, melon and berries
    etc. all winter. They didn't walk from Chile to your neighborhood
    grocer's by themselves. And the grocer's overhead costs don't go down
    just because produce is in season, so there's not much motivation to
    lower prices in the summer except for weekly "loss leaders".

    gloria p

  10. #10
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    James Silverton wrote:
    > Hello All!
    >
    > I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh store-bought
    > fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated the real cost of other
    > foods, particularly vegetables? I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    > wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods themselves and
    > how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?



    I usually only buy asparagus when it is in season and I buy it at a
    neighbourhood fruit and vegetable stand. I don't have to break off much,
    and I like asparagus so much that I am willing to pay for the tail
    ends that get chucked. I love fresh peas, but I find them obscenely
    expensive. You buy a quart basket of them for about $4 and after
    spending more than 20 minutes shelling them you have enough for two
    scant servings.

    For those of us you like asparagus and peas, there is a similar
    vegetable that is available for only a short time in the spring....
    fiddleheads. There is very little waste. You just scrap off that little
    bit of brown beard around the sides and soak them in salt water for a
    while, then boil them. They are quite tasty.

    > Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is trout where
    > the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I don't trust any fish
    > seller displaying trout filets ("for your convenience" or so you can't
    > see the eyes.)


    Around here we can buy whole small trout, but the larger ones are
    usually filleted because they can split them down the middle and sell
    one side or one end. I often buy trout fillets.

  11. #11
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Dave Smith wrote:

    > For those of us you like asparagus and peas, there is a similar vegetable
    > that is available for only a short time in the spring.... fiddleheads.
    > There is very little waste. You just scrap off that little bit of brown
    > beard around the sides and soak them in salt water for a while, then boil
    > them. They are quite tasty.


    With fiddleheads, there appears to be a trade-off between palatability and
    toxicity. The longer you cook them, the less toxic they become, but the
    worse they taste. If you get the timing JUST RIGHT, you end up with
    something tasty which won't give you a day or two of misery.

    <http://blogs.wsj.com/magazine/2009/04/28/mini-specialist-found-foodfiddlehead-ferns/>
    is a pretty good article about fiddleheads, including some suggestions for
    what to do with them.

    Bob


  12. #12
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Dave Smith wrote:


    > For those of us you like asparagus and peas, there is a similar
    > vegetable that is available for only a short time in the spring....
    > fiddleheads. There is very little waste. You just scrap off that little
    > bit of brown beard around the sides and soak them in salt water for a
    > while, then boil them. They are quite tasty.


    It's probably been a month or so, but I found fiddleheads at Whole
    Foods. At $16.99/lb. I had to wonder if they are worth it -- and how
    many it takes to be a serving. I'd rather get chanterelles at that price
    (which is what they average at WF). Not too long after that, we were
    staying in Los Gatos and I was doing one of my usual photo safaris. Came
    across some gorgeous ferns on the grounds and thought about those
    fiddleheads. Are all ferns edible?

    http://i47.tinypic.com/b6xzf4.jpg

    >> Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is trout where
    >> the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I don't trust any fish
    >> seller displaying trout filets ("for your convenience" or so you can't
    >> see the eyes.)


    I love whole trout, too. Albertsons butcher block used to sell a golden
    trout (most likely farmed) that had a lot of meat on them. It's been a
    while since I've seen one of those pretty fish in any store.

    > Around here we can buy whole small trout, but the larger ones are
    > usually filleted because they can split them down the middle and sell
    > one side or one end. I often buy trout fillets.


    When I don't feel like messing with bones (my one complaint of trout)
    I'll get fillets if the price is right.

    --Lin

  13. #13
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Lin wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 13:09:48 -0700:

    >> For those of us you like asparagus and peas, there is a
    >> similar vegetable that is available for only a short time in the
    >> spring.... fiddleheads. There is very little waste. You
    >> just scrap off that little bit of brown beard around the
    >> sides and soak them in salt water for a while, then boil
    >> them. They are quite tasty.


    > It's probably been a month or so, but I found fiddleheads at
    > Whole Foods. At $16.99/lb. I had to wonder if they are worth
    > it -- and how many it takes to be a serving. I'd rather get
    > chanterelles at that price (which is what they average at WF).
    > Not too long after that, we were staying in Los Gatos and I
    > was doing one of my usual photo safaris. Came across some
    > gorgeous ferns on the grounds and thought about those fiddleheads. Are
    > all ferns edible?


    > http://i47.tinypic.com/b6xzf4.jpg


    >>> Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is
    >>> trout where the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I
    >>> don't trust any fish seller displaying trout filets ("for
    >>> your convenience" or so you can't see the eyes.)


    > I love whole trout, too. Albertsons butcher block used to sell
    > a golden trout (most likely farmed) that had a lot of meat on them.
    > It's been a while since I've seen one of those pretty
    > fish in any store.


    >> Around here we can buy whole small trout, but the larger ones
    >> are usually filleted because they can split them down the
    >> middle and sell one side or one end. I often buy trout
    >> fillets.


    > When I don't feel like messing with bones (my one complaint of
    > trout) I'll get fillets if the price is right.


    I think I mentioned that the trout I buy is deboned tho' head, skin and
    tail are still on.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  14. #14
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation



    James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > Hello All!
    >
    > I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh store-bought
    > fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated the real cost of other
    > foods, particularly vegetables? I don't eat fresh green peas often but I
    > wonder how much of the weight you buy comes from the pods themselves and
    > how much do you trim off asparagus before cooking it?
    >
    > Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is trout where
    > the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I don't trust any fish
    > seller displaying trout filets ("for your convenience" or so you can't
    > see the eyes.)
    >



    Depends on what you call 'wastage' really.

    'Fresh' peas in the pods, the pods go into the vegetable stock pot. In
    our family, asparagus ends also ended up in the soup pot.

    When we have fresh trout, only the head is removed after cooking. If
    sauteed properly, the skin is crisp and delicious. ?Why throw it away?
    Only the very end of the tail needs to be removed; the flesh can be
    eaten to that point. The bits you throw away can be used to make fish
    stock in any case.

    Normally I don't peel carrots; that's for 'company' food LOL.
    Unfortunately TMU prefers her potatoes peeled, but on my own they don't
    get peeled for boiling.

  15. #15
    Lew Hodgett Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation


    "Arri London" wrote:

    > Normally I don't peel carrots; that's for 'company' food LOL.

    ------------------------------------------
    You want an argument, change the subject.

    I just scrub them with a 3M pad and call it a day.

    Don't know if it's true or not, but was always taught that most of the
    "food value" of most vegetables was next to the skin.

    Some things you don't forget<G>.

    Lew




  16. #16
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Lin wrote:

    >> For those of us you like asparagus and peas, there is a similar
    >> vegetable that is available for only a short time in the spring....
    >> fiddleheads. There is very little waste. You just scrap off that
    >> little bit of brown beard around the sides and soak them in salt water
    >> for a while, then boil them. They are quite tasty.

    >
    > It's probably been a month or so, but I found fiddleheads at Whole
    > Foods. At $16.99/lb. I had to wonder if they are worth it -- and how
    > many it takes to be a serving.


    $16.99 per pound??? Wow. I thought that they were expensive at $5 per
    pound. If they are normal size, 6-8 would make a good portion. They
    are tasty, but as I said, they are similar in taste to asparagus and
    fresh peas, so anyone who doesn't like those things may not lake them.

  17. #17
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation



    Lew Hodgett wrote:
    >
    > "Arri London" wrote:
    >
    > > Normally I don't peel carrots; that's for 'company' food LOL.

    > ------------------------------------------
    > You want an argument, change the subject.


    Hah!
    >
    > I just scrub them with a 3M pad and call it a day.
    >
    > Don't know if it's true or not, but was always taught that most of the
    > "food value" of most vegetables was next to the skin.
    >
    > Some things you don't forget<G>.
    >
    > Lew



    It's more about my being a really lazy sod!

    My grandmother certainly carefully peeled most vegetables prior to
    cooking.

  18. #18
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    Arri wrote on Tue, 25 May 2010 18:13:42 -0600:


    > James Silverton wrote:
    >>
    >> Hello All!
    >>
    >> I recently worked out the rather ridiculous cost of fresh
    >> store-bought fava beans. I wonder if anyone has calculated
    >> the real cost of other foods, particularly vegetables? I
    >> don't eat fresh green peas often but I wonder how much of the
    >> weight you buy comes from the pods themselves and how much do
    >> you trim off asparagus before cooking it?
    >>
    >> Another food that I like with a large amount of wastage is
    >> trout where the skin, head and tail have to be removed. I
    >> don't trust any fish seller displaying trout filets ("for
    >> your convenience" or so you can't see the eyes.)
    >>

    > Depends on what you call 'wastage' really.


    > 'Fresh' peas in the pods, the pods go into the vegetable stock
    > pot. In our family, asparagus ends also ended up in the soup
    > pot.


    > When we have fresh trout, only the head is removed after
    > cooking. If sauteed properly, the skin is crisp and delicious.
    > ?Why throw it away? Only the very end of the tail needs to be
    > removed; the flesh can be eaten to that point. The bits you
    > throw away can be used to make fish stock in any case.


    I have tried various crisp fish skins from time to time and I find most
    of them disgusting and that includes salmon skin sushi hand rolls and
    Japanese grilled eel. The fish oils seem to concentrate in the skin and
    I just don't like it. I admit that I did once or twice enjoy some *very
    fresh* deep-fried sole.

    I don't make stock or soup from scratch tho' I quite like miso soup and
    Hawaiian Saimin but I use prepared store-bought Japanese stock for
    those.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  19. #19
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    On Sat, 29 May 2010 15:13:21 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have tried various crisp fish skins from time to time and I find most


    this is where I said UGH

    > of them disgusting and that includes salmon skin sushi hand rolls and
    > Japanese grilled eel.


    Same conclusion. TY. I don't order those things because they don't
    sound like I'd like them. I did try Unagi and it was fine, but I
    still can't order it because just the thought of eel makes me queasy.


    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  20. #20
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Real cost of food after preparation

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Same conclusion. TY. I don't order those things because they don't
    > sound like I'd like them. I did try Unagi and it was fine, but I
    > still can't order it because just the thought of eel makes me queasy.


    Oh! Me, too! The eel, even though it is cooked, just creeps me out.
    I imagine if I were starving, I would eat it, but we are not starving,
    so those who like it can have my share.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

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