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Thread: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

  1. #1
    Kent Guest

    Default "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

    I have a "Ready to Cook" cured Smithfield shank half ham and I'd like to
    grill it, rather than baking it as per the instructions on the Smithfield
    site. I followed this the last time I cooked this ham. Basically the ham
    steams in a 350F oven. The added water drains into the pan it's sitting it.
    I'd really like to try roasting it on the grill, either my 22" kettle, or my
    18" Weber Smokey Mountain. Have any tried this? Below is a recipe from the
    "Virtual Weber Bullet

    "For a "ready to cook" ham, fire the cooker to 325?F. Put the foil-lined
    water pan in place, but leave it dry to keep the temperature up in the
    cooker. Place 2-3 chunks of dry smoke wood on the coals and cook according
    to the packaging instructions, usually 10-15 minutes per pound. If desired,
    apply a glaze during the last hour of cooking. Cook to 145-150?F internal
    temperature, then allow the ham to rest 15-20 minutes until it reaches a
    final temperature of 155-160?F."

    I'm concerned that placing the ham on its side is going to dry out the cut
    end at 350F. Have any had that experience? Is there any trick to make this
    work right?" Do you glaze your ham? Have any tried smoking a ham like this
    with the water pan at 250F?

    Kent



  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 14:19:25 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have a "Ready to Cook" cured Smithfield shank half ham and I'd like to
    > grill it, rather than baking it as per the instructions on the Smithfield
    > site. I followed this the last time I cooked this ham. Basically the ham
    > steams in a 350F oven. The added water drains into the pan it's sitting it.
    > I'd really like to try roasting it on the grill, either my 22" kettle, or my
    > 18" Weber Smokey Mountain. Have any tried this? Below is a recipe from the
    > "Virtual Weber Bullet
    >
    > "For a "ready to cook" ham, fire the cooker to 325?F. Put the foil-lined
    > water pan in place, but leave it dry to keep the temperature up in the
    > cooker. Place 2-3 chunks of dry smoke wood on the coals and cook according
    > to the packaging instructions, usually 10-15 minutes per pound. If desired,
    > apply a glaze during the last hour of cooking. Cook to 145-150?F internal
    > temperature, then allow the ham to rest 15-20 minutes until it reaches a
    > final temperature of 155-160?F."
    >
    > I'm concerned that placing the ham on its side is going to dry out the cut
    > end at 350F. Have any had that experience? Is there any trick to make this
    > work right?" Do you glaze your ham? Have any tried smoking a ham like this
    > with the water pan at 250F?
    >

    I'd still be concerned that Smithfield was too salty. I still
    remember having to soak hams before baking.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  3. #3
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 14:19:25 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I have a "Ready to Cook" cured Smithfield shank half ham and I'd like to
    >> grill it, rather than baking it as per the instructions on the Smithfield
    >> site. I followed this the last time I cooked this ham. Basically the ham
    >> steams in a 350F oven. The added water drains into the pan it's sitting
    >> it.
    >> I'd really like to try roasting it on the grill, either my 22" kettle, or
    >> my
    >> 18" Weber Smokey Mountain. Have any tried this? Below is a recipe from
    >> the
    >> "Virtual Weber Bullet
    >>
    >> "For a "ready to cook" ham, fire the cooker to 325?F. Put the foil-lined
    >> water pan in place, but leave it dry to keep the temperature up in the
    >> cooker. Place 2-3 chunks of dry smoke wood on the coals and cook
    >> according
    >> to the packaging instructions, usually 10-15 minutes per pound. If
    >> desired,
    >> apply a glaze during the last hour of cooking. Cook to 145-150?F internal
    >> temperature, then allow the ham to rest 15-20 minutes until it reaches a
    >> final temperature of 155-160?F."
    >>
    >> I'm concerned that placing the ham on its side is going to dry out the
    >> cut
    >> end at 350F. Have any had that experience? Is there any trick to make
    >> this
    >> work right?" Do you glaze your ham? Have any tried smoking a ham like
    >> this
    >> with the water pan at 250F?
    >>

    > I'd still be concerned that Smithfield was too salty. I still
    > remember having to soak hams before baking.
    >
    > --

    The Smithfield ham you're referring to is the dry cured "Virginia Ham". In
    addition to that the Smithfield Corporation makes all the other forms of
    cured ham, including fully cooked and fully cooked sliced hams. They also
    make an "ready to cook" cured ham called the "Smithfield Ham". That's the
    one I'm trying to bake. It's not cooked, unlike the vast majority of hams on
    the market, and must, therefore be cooked to a temp. of about 148F. They
    also make a "Cook's Ham" brand, which is uncooked, or "ready to cook" that
    is cured and has a more smokey flavor, probably from liquid smoke. I should
    have clarified that in my post. I don't know why the Smithfield Corporation
    almost deliberately tries to confuse us about this.
    http://smithfield.com/articles/artic...am-preparation Go down to the
    third paragraph "Ready to Cook bone in".

    I'd really like to know why you can't, or aren't supposed to eat dry cured
    Virginia style hams raw. This includes Gawaltney and Smithfield and others.
    They should be identical to proscuitto, and you shouldn't have to cook them.

    Kent




  4. #4
    itsjoannotjoann Guest

    Default Re: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

    On Nov 13, 6:03*pm, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > "sf" <s...@geemail.com> wrote in message
    >
    >
    > > I'd still be concerned that Smithfield was too salty. *I still
    > > remember having to soak hams before baking.

    >
    >
    > The Smithfield ham you're referring to is the dry cured "Virginia Ham".
    > I'd really like to know why you can't, or aren't supposed to eat dry cured
    > Virginia style hams raw. This includes Gawaltney and Smithfield and others.
    > They should be identical to proscuitto, and you shouldn't have to cook them.
    >
    > Kent
    >
    >

    Go ahead, be my guest. But I can guarantee you that you will be
    absolutely miserable for many hours. There is not enough water to
    quench your thirst. The ham has been cured with salt but not cooked;
    salting is not the same thing as cooking and cooking will tenderize
    that ham. Do you eat chicken or beef raw?

  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 14:19:25 -0800, Kent wrote:

    > I have a "Ready to Cook" cured Smithfield shank half ham and I'd like to
    > grill it, rather than baking it as per the instructions on the Smithfield
    > site.


    But...but... I've been trying to tell you these exist for years and
    you keep telling me there is no such thing... That I must be
    referring to a dry-cured country ham because that is what a
    "Smithfield" ham is, and nothing else.

    How do you now explain the appearance of a "Smithfield Brand
    Wet-Cured Ham"" after so many years of denying it's very existence?

    -sw

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 16:03:20 -0800, "Kent" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > The Smithfield ham you're referring to is the dry cured "Virginia Ham".


    I'm talking about regular old grocery store hams that were so salty I
    had to soak them to make them edible.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: "Ready to Cook" Smithfield Ham

    On Sat, 13 Nov 2010 16:33:05 -0800 (PST), itsjoannotjoann wrote:

    > On Nov 13, 6:03*pm, "Kent" <aka.k...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    >
    >> The Smithfield ham you're referring to is the dry cured "Virginia Ham".
    >> I'd really like to know why you can't, or aren't supposed to eat dry cured
    >> Virginia style hams raw. This includes Gawaltney and Smithfield and others.
    >> They should be identical to proscuitto, and you shouldn't have to cook them.
    >>

    > Go ahead, be my guest. But I can guarantee you that you will be
    > absolutely miserable for many hours. There is not enough water to
    > quench your thirst. The ham has been cured with salt but not cooked;
    > salting is not the same thing as cooking and cooking will tenderize
    > that ham. Do you eat chicken or beef raw?


    Kent has been insisting that Dry Cured Smithfield Hams "should be"
    just as good as an Italian proscuitto or Spanish serrano for years,
    but he has never tried it. About a dozen people have tried to tell
    him that he's full of **** (and salt), but he refuses to listen.

    He refuses to believe that a Smithield dry-cured ham has so much
    salt and is so dry that it requires a powered saw to cut it.

    -sw

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