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Thread: Re: Zoop!

  1. #1
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    On Oct 4, 7:30*pm, "Gregory Morrow" <wwww9...@wwwwl.fi> wrote:
    > Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > Frozen beef and chicken broths, fresh celery, carrots, and onions.
    > > Frozen green beans, corn, peas. *Fresh parsley. *A bit of tomato
    > > powder. A can of beef purchased in Amishland last October. *Poured
    > > over chopped leftover linguine. *Fresh-baked bread. * *Will schlep to
    > > The Widow Dorothy's in 45 minutes to enjoy while we watch "The
    > > Amazing Race." Sucks to be you.

    >
    > Well, I just got done cooking a tasty BIG crockpot of beef stew, so beingme
    > isn't *too* shabby...
    >
    > ;-)
    >
    > I LOVE this cooler weather, great for making those hearty dishes, baking,
    > etc...
    >
    > --
    > Best
    > Greg


    I love the cooler weather, too. We just had shephard's pie because of
    it.

    Kris

  2. #2
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    > dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    > two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    > dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    > ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    > *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    > control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    > prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    > pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    > conditions.


    I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    weather and the seasons of the year.

    Michael

    --
    “Always tell the truth - it's the easiest thing to remember”
    ~ American Playwright David Mamet

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  3. #3
    Michael \Dog3\ Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking

    >
    > I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    > dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    > two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    > dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    > ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    > *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    > control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    > prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    > pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    > conditions.


    I can't speak for anyone else. For me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    weather and the seasons of the year.

    Michael

    --
    “Always tell the truth - it's the easiest thing to remember”
    ~ American Playwright David Mamet

    You can find me at: - michael at lonergan dot us dot com

  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Michael "Dog3" wrote:

    >> I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >> dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >> two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >> dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >> ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >> *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >> control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >> prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >> pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >> conditions.

    >
    > I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    > food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    > outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    > towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    > weather and the seasons of the year.


    During the summer I like to spend time outside. I like cooking on the
    grill and eating on the patio. Besides, it seems a bit of a waste of
    energy to have to run the AC to cool the house down while you are
    filling it up wit heat from the oven or stove top. When the weather is
    hot I tend to eat lighter meals. When it starts getting cold out I like
    to eat heartier meals. I am heating the house anyway, there is no
    problem having the oven on and warming things up. My wife and I are both
    pretty good at braised dishes.



  5. #5
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!


    "Michael "Dog3"" <don'[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >>
    >> I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >> dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >> two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >> dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >> ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >> *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >> control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >> prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >> pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >> conditions.

    >
    > I can't speak for anyone else. For me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    > food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    > outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    > towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    > weather and the seasons of the year.


    yep yep yep for us too

    Anyway... if we have the same things all year round.... I do like the
    seasonal thing! Some things to look forward to




  6. #6
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    On Mon, 05 Oct 2009 11:21:24 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    >
    >>> I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >>> dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >>> two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >>> dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >>> ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >>> *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >>> control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >>> prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >>> pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >>> conditions.

    >>
    >> I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    >> food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    >> outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    >> towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    >> weather and the seasons of the year.

    >
    >During the summer I like to spend time outside. I like cooking on the
    >grill and eating on the patio. Besides, it seems a bit of a waste of
    >energy to have to run the AC to cool the house down while you are
    >filling it up wit heat from the oven or stove top. When the weather is
    >hot I tend to eat lighter meals. When it starts getting cold out I like
    >to eat heartier meals. I am heating the house anyway, there is no
    >problem having the oven on and warming things up. My wife and I are both
    >pretty good at braised dishes.
    >

    I'll do short stove top cooking during warm weather but I refrain from
    using the oven as much as possible... I consider the oven part of my
    heating system, I don't see the point in having the oven negate my
    A/C... heck, even during winter I don't light my oven just for me,
    only if I have company, I'm not about to light the oven for a single
    baked potato no matter what season.

    During warm weather I tend to take advantage of as much fresh seasonal
    fruits and veggies as possible (salads are just not so good with
    winter produce) and I mostly use the outdoor grill for cooking meats
    and even veggies.

    If I feel like hearty soups and stews during warm weather I always
    have a choice of those I cooked during cold weather in my freezer... I
    think anyone who claims they enjoy soups/stews all year is pretty
    foolish not to make plenty extra during the cold months. I freeze
    pasta dishes, meat loaf, even those panfuls of giant burgers... do
    yoose really think I eat seven 14 ounce burgers in one fell swoop...
    but they freeze very nicely... then braise a couple in gravy like
    salisbury steak.


  7. #7
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Michael \"Dog3\"" <don'[email protected]> wrote:

    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    > >
    > > I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    > > dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    > > two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    > > dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    > > ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    > > *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    > > control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    > > prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    > > pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    > > conditions.

    >
    > I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    > food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    > outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    > towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    > weather and the seasons of the year.


    I'm with Michael here. Still, I *don't* have air conditioning. We
    lived in Sacramento a couple of months, and the apartment had an air
    conditioner. The city didn't have much in the way of jobs, though. So,
    in almost 60 years, that's my only living experience with an air
    conditioner, two months. If I *did* have an air conditioner, and was
    cooking something, I would spend the whole time thinking about my next
    electric bill. Air conditioners suck up a lot of electricity, and
    stoves create a lot of heat. Not a good combination. Cooking outside
    appeals to me more on a hot day, just because it doesn't heat up the
    house.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  8. #8
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Dan wrote on Mon, 05 Oct 2009 09:19:18 -0700:

    >> "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >>
    > >> I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to
    > >> cook certain dishes. Don't you people have air
    > >> conditioning? I made a chuck roast two weeks ago. It was
    > >> 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken & dumplings.
    > >> It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated
    > >> country ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only
    > >> 85 degrees. LOL) *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do
    > >> seasons and outside temperature control what people cook?
    > >> I'd truly like to understand this. I prepare and eat hot
    > >> soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot pie,
    > >> chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special
    > >> weather conditions.

    >>
    >> I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a
    >> seasonal comfort food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl
    >> of beef stew after being outdoors all day on a crisp, cool
    >> day. When it's cold outside I gravitate towards more filling,
    >> hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the weather and
    >> the seasons of the year.


    > I'm with Michael here. Still, I *don't* have air
    > conditioning. We lived in Sacramento a couple of months, and
    > the apartment had an air conditioner. The city didn't have
    > much in the way of jobs, though. So, in almost 60 years,
    > that's my only living experience with an air conditioner, two
    > months. If I *did* have an air conditioner, and was cooking
    > something, I would spend the whole time thinking about my next
    > electric bill. Air conditioners suck up a lot of electricity,
    > and stoves create a lot of heat. Not a good combination.
    > Cooking outside appeals to me more on a hot day, just because
    > it doesn't heat up the house.


    You remind me of the professor from San Francisco whom I heard
    testifying before Congress that AC was an unnecessary luxury. The
    temperature in Washington was running about 100F that week so he
    convinced nobody here.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  9. #9
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    In article <4aca0ef8$0$1601$[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > During the summer I like to spend time outside. I like cooking on the
    > grill and eating on the patio. Besides, it seems a bit of a waste of
    > energy to have to run the AC to cool the house down while you are
    > filling it up wit heat from the oven or stove top. When the weather is
    > hot I tend to eat lighter meals. When it starts getting cold out I like
    > to eat heartier meals. I am heating the house anyway, there is no
    > problem having the oven on and warming things up. My wife and I are both
    > pretty good at braised dishes.


    That's exactly it. Not to mention, most folks like to butcher in the
    fall and winter, so it's a good time to get a nice fresh piece of roast
    or what have you. We don't want to waste the energy, the money in
    buying things out of season and using up our electricity unwisely or the
    time, as we enjoy being out of doors and active while the weather is
    nice.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    James Silverton wrote:


    > You remind me of the professor from San Francisco whom I heard
    > testifying before Congress that AC was an unnecessary luxury. The
    > temperature in Washington was running about 100F that week so he
    > convinced nobody here.



    I was in a bind last week when I had the heating contractor over to
    discuss my new furnace. Our AC is about 35 years old and was last used
    three years ago and only for a few days when we had out of town guests
    staying with us and it was very hot and muggy. the last two summers have
    been relatively cool. My wife suffers from allergies and would like to
    start using it again. The new one is high efficiency and should be
    cheaper to run. I could live without if the weather stays the way it has
    been, but I figure that we live in weather cycles and maybe next summer
    it will get hot and sticky again and it will be nice to have. There are
    lots of rebates available for switching to high efficiency so U may as
    well take advantage of them now.

  11. #11
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    In article
    <0988aa2[email protected]>,
    Kris <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I love the cooler weather, too. We just had shephard's pie because of
    > it.
    >
    > Kris


    I finally flipped the switch on our furnace when the weather guy said it
    was a typical November day. :-\

    I have a vat of shicken zoop on the stove. Smells good.


    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  12. #12
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    > dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning?


    Sure. And it seems counter-productive to use it and then heat a room
    with an oven. Some people try to economize on their utility usage.

    > I made a chuck roast two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I
    > made a pot of chicken & dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I
    > roasted marinated country ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it
    > was only 85 degrees. LOL) *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do
    > seasons and outside temperature control what people cook?



    My best guess is that some foods come to mind when people feel the need
    to eat certain foods to improve their well-being or perception of how
    they feel about life. Some people monitor their utility bills and see
    no need to heat an oven that will heat a kitchen that will or may
    require turning on the air conditioning system to return comfort to the
    inside of the house. And some people don't mind hot weather and don't
    mind heating the kitchen with oven usage when the temps are in the
    90s‹seems like you're one of them. No problem. Some people major in
    cold food when the temps are hot, some don't. If I want pot roast and
    the forecast is for a hot day, I'll cook it early in the morning and
    reheat it ‹ the hottest part of our day is at about 5-6:00 p.m.

    > I'd truly like to understand this.


    It's an internal preference setting.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  13. #13
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Kris <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I love the cooler weather, too. We just had shephard's pie because of
    >>it.
    >>
    >>Kris

    >
    >
    > I finally flipped the switch on our furnace when the weather guy said it
    > was a typical November day. :-\
    >
    > I have a vat of shicken zoop on the stove. Smells good.
    >
    >

    I've got a pot of shicken zoop on the stove.

    It hasn't been anywhere near cool enough to need the furnace. In fact,
    I've been enjoying sleeping with the windows open under a couple of quilts.

    My kids love the smell of the furnace when we turn it on for the first
    time in the fall. They also think the laundry room smells good. To me
    those things smell like fried dust and tedious work, respectively.


  14. #14
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Michael "Dog3" wrote:

    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    > news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >
    >
    >>I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >>dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >>two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >>dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >>ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >>*Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >>control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >>prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >>pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >>conditions.

    >
    >
    > I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    > food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    > outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    > towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    > weather and the seasons of the year.
    >
    > Michael
    >


    Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those
    nice ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and
    pepper in the fridge...

    I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like
    to stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his
    ass out there and build me a covered patio right quick.

    We had Stephanina's.


  15. #15
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!


    "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:16qym.38525$[email protected]..
    > Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    >
    >> "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >> news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >>>I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >>>dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >>>two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >>>dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >>>ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >>>*Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >>>control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >>>prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >>>pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >>>conditions.

    >>
    >>
    >> I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    >> food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    >> outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    >> towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    >> weather and the seasons of the year.
    >>
    >> Michael
    >>

    >
    > Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    > plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those nice
    > ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and pepper in
    > the fridge...
    >
    > I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like to
    > stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his ass
    > out there and build me a covered patio right quick.


    lol


    > We had Stephanina's.
    >




  16. #16
    Kathleen Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Ophelia wrote:

    > "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:16qym.38525$[email protected]..
    >
    >>Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>>news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >>>
    >>>>I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >>>>dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >>>>two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >>>>dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >>>>ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >>>>*Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >>>>control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >>>>prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >>>>pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >>>>conditions.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    >>>food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    >>>outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    >>>towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    >>>weather and the seasons of the year.
    >>>
    >>>Michael
    >>>

    >>
    >>Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    >>plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those nice
    >>ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and pepper in
    >>the fridge...
    >>
    >>I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like to
    >>stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his ass
    >>out there and build me a covered patio right quick.

    >
    >
    > lol
    >
    >
    >
    >>We had Stephanina's.


    The pizza was excellent and there were leftovers for breakfast, and the
    steaks absolutely kicked ass, having had an additional 24 hours to
    absorb flavor from a non-acidic marinade that did not digest them into mush.

    (If they'd been sitting in an acidic marinade I'd have gone ahead and
    pan-fried them, knowing they'd have been ruined otherwise)


  17. #17
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Ophelia wrote:
    > "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:16qym.38525$[email protected]..
    >> Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    >>
    >>> "jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>> news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >>>> I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >>>> dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >>>> two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >>>> dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >>>> ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >>>> *Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >>>> control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >>>> prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >>>> pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >>>> conditions.
    >>>
    >>> I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    >>> food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    >>> outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I gravitate
    >>> towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve around the
    >>> weather and the seasons of the year.
    >>>
    >>> Michael
    >>>

    >> Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    >> plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those nice
    >> ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and pepper in
    >> the fridge...
    >>
    >> I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like to
    >> stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his ass
    >> out there and build me a covered patio right quick.

    >
    > lol
    >
    >
    >> We had Stephanina's.
    >>

    >
    >


    I don't know why you would laugh... I know the quality of the women that
    post here, and it's likely I'd stand in the rain for you any day.

    OTOH, I'm smart enough to use remote thermometers, and go out when the
    rain is light.

    :-)

    bob

  18. #18
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    Kathleen wrote:
    >
    >
    > Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    > plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those
    > nice ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and
    > pepper in the fridge...
    >
    > I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like
    > to stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his
    > ass out there and build me a covered patio right quick.


    I have been known to stand in the rain to grill steaks. I might monitor
    the situation and get them started earlier or do them a little later,
    but if I have steaks ready to go, I will tolerate the rain. I would
    rather do it in nice weather. However, I don't plan on grilling steaks
    outside in the winter.

  19. #19
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!

    In article <4aca3b12$0$1613$[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Kathleen wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > > Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    > > plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those
    > > nice ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and
    > > pepper in the fridge...
    > >
    > > I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like
    > > to stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his
    > > ass out there and build me a covered patio right quick.

    >
    > I have been known to stand in the rain to grill steaks. I might monitor
    > the situation and get them started earlier or do them a little later,
    > but if I have steaks ready to go, I will tolerate the rain. I would
    > rather do it in nice weather. However, I don't plan on grilling steaks
    > outside in the winter.


    When we lived on the west side, rain didn't stop us from grilling.
    Even here, rain doesn't stop us from grilling if we want to do it, but
    on the west side, some summers, if you waited for a nice night, you
    might not grill.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  20. #20
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Zoop!


    "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:Uvqym.38527$[email protected]..
    > Ophelia wrote:
    >
    >> "Kathleen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:16qym.38525$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>>Michael "Dog3" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>"jmcquown" <[email protected]>
    >>>>news:[email protected]: in rec.food.cooking
    >>>>
    >>>>>I don't understand why people wait for cooler weather to cook certain
    >>>>>dishes. Don't you people have air conditioning? I made a chuck roast
    >>>>>two weeks ago. It was 90 degrees outside. I made a pot of chicken &
    >>>>>dumplings. It was 90 degrees outside. I roasted marinated country
    >>>>>ribs in the oven. (We had a cold snap, it was only 85 degrees. LOL)
    >>>>>*Inside* it was 73 degrees. Why do seasons and outside temperature
    >>>>>control what people cook? I'd truly like to understand this. I
    >>>>>prepare and eat hot soup all year round. Shepard's pie, chicken pot
    >>>>>pie, chili, stew... doesn't seem to require special weather
    >>>>>conditions.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>I can't speak for anyone else but for me it's more of a seasonal comfort
    >>>>food type of thing. Nothing like a big bowl of beef stew after being
    >>>>outdoors all day on a crisp, cool day. When it's cold outside I
    >>>>gravitate towards more filling, hot foods. For me it seems to revolve
    >>>>around the weather and the seasons of the year.
    >>>>
    >>>>Michael
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>Yeah, and *daily* weather, not just seasonal. My husband asked me
    >>>plaintively why I'd decided to order pizza instead of grilling those nice
    >>>ribeyes he'd seen marinating in olive oil, garlic, sea salt and pepper in
    >>>the fridge...
    >>>
    >>>I glanced pointedly at the window and suggested that perhaps HE'D like to
    >>>stand in the driving rain and monitor them. Either that or get his ass
    >>>out there and build me a covered patio right quick.

    >>
    >>
    >> lol
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>>We had Stephanina's.

    >
    > The pizza was excellent and there were leftovers for breakfast, and the
    > steaks absolutely kicked ass, having had an additional 24 hours to absorb
    > flavor from a non-acidic marinade that did not digest them into mush.
    >
    > (If they'd been sitting in an acidic marinade I'd have gone ahead and
    > pan-fried them, knowing they'd have been ruined otherwise)


    Yers!!! I am so pleased it all turned out well))

    Now... about that covered patio............. <g>



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