On May 14, 9:22*am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
> On Fri, 13 May 2011 20:04:49 -0400, James Silverton
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> <not.jim.silver...@verizon.net> wrote:
> >On 5/13/2011 5:56 PM, Victor Sack wrote:
> >> Kalmia<tweeny90...@mypacks.net> *wrote:

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> >>> A recipe calls for it. *How different is this from regular sesame
> >>> oil? *Or does it imply that the oil should be heated to a certain
> >>> stage?

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> >> Regular sesame oil has a relativley not very assertive taste and aroma
> >> and is used as a cooking oil in Central Asian and Far Eastern cuisines..
> >> Tasted sesame oil has a very strong taste and tends to be used as a
> >> flavouring by the teaspoon or even by the drop. *An extra drop can
> >> sometimes be too much and spoil the dish.

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> >I've absolutely never regretted using *two* drops of toasted sesame oil
> >in dishes that I cook for myself and where it is appropriate. I also put
> >a couple of drops into the hummus that I make without tahini.

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> Toasted sesame seed oil should be added at the very end of cooking...
> it's a condiment... the fact that it's typically packaged in tiny
> bottles that deliver by drops like hot sauce should be clue enough. An
> extra drop or three won't hurt but is just wasteful... however too
> much can indeed negatively affect the dish by over powering the
> flavors of other subtley flavored ingredients like vegetables and mild
> flavored meats like pork, chicken and shellfish. *Like vanilla and
> saffron toasted sesame seed oil is another ingredient where less is
> more. *It's also best to purchase the smallest size as toasted sesame
> seed oil begins to go rancid in about a year... you may want to
> consider keeping it in the fridge but away from dairy.


Add sage to that list of "less is more." I've ruined a few things by
over-saging.