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Thread: Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

  1. #1
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 08:34:16 -0600, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >A few of these were already guessed in another group, so if you know
    >them from there, no fair. Let the others guess. Ambiguous answers
    >such as "sweet potato" are not acceptable. These are specific
    >varieties that are clearly easily recognized by their shapes (if you
    >knwo what they are, of course).


    Wow-- I only recognized 3 [4?] of the 10. I'd be tempted to buy at
    least 1/2 of the others.

    I learned the way to chose unknown produce is to hang out in the
    produce aisle and wait for a customer to come along that is taking a
    long time to pick the *right* one. So far they've all been more than
    happy to share tips on picking the good ones-- and how to prepare
    them.

    I gave it a shot with avocados last week and made some guacamole that
    the kids said was 'the bomb' --- I'm still not a fan, but at least I
    know I was using the right fruit.

    Jim

  2. #2
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge


    "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Wow-- I only recognized 3 [4?] of the 10. I'd be tempted to buy at
    > least 1/2 of the others.
    >
    > I learned the way to chose unknown produce is to hang out in the
    > produce aisle and wait for a customer to come along that is taking a
    > long time to pick the *right* one. So far they've all been more than
    > happy to share tips on picking the good ones-- and how to prepare
    > them.
    >

    I'm always happy to help when people look confused at the vegetable stand or
    in the produce aisle, if I know the answer. I still refuse to buy things
    like broccoflower (who wants a florescent green vegetable?), orange
    cauliflower or tiny purple potatoes. Sorry, that's just too weird even for
    me. And the brighter they are, the more they cost.

    > I gave it a shot with avocados last week and made some guacamole that
    > the kids said was 'the bomb' --- I'm still not a fan, but at least I
    > know I was using the right fruit.
    >
    > Jim


    I'm not a guacamole fan, either, Jim. But glad your kids enjoyed it! It
    took decades before I ever tasted an avocado. My mother loved them; it's
    the only reason I ever tried them. And I learned how select them. Avocados
    aren't bad. IMHO, they aren't anything to write to friends and relatives
    about, either. Some people get all excited about Hass avocados. Go figure


    Jill


  3. #3
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On 20/11/2011 12:25 PM, jmcquown wrote:

    >
    > I'm not a guacamole fan, either, Jim. But glad your kids enjoyed it! It
    > took decades before I ever tasted an avocado. My mother loved them; it's
    > the only reason I ever tried them. And I learned how select them.
    > Avocados aren't bad. IMHO, they aren't anything to write to friends and
    > relatives about, either. Some people get all excited about Hass
    > avocados. Go figure



    There is guacamole and there is guacamole. It took me a while to become
    an avocado fan and a guacamole fan. I enjoy avocados but they are
    expensive here and IMO. not worth it.

    Our neighbours regularly have very large parties and a lot of the food
    is brought by some Mexican friends of theirs. At one of their parties
    last year the mother of the Mexican friends brought some guacamole that
    was incredible. The avocado was just right, not all much. There was
    just the right amount of garlic and heat. The winning ingredient was the
    cilantro. It set a whole new scale for judging guacamole.

  4. #4
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge


    "Dave Smith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:y7cyq.128305$[email protected] com...
    > On 20/11/2011 12:25 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> I'm not a guacamole fan, either, Jim. But glad your kids enjoyed it! It
    >> took decades before I ever tasted an avocado. My mother loved them; it's
    >> the only reason I ever tried them. And I learned how select them.
    >> Avocados aren't bad. IMHO, they aren't anything to write to friends and
    >> relatives about, either. Some people get all excited about Hass
    >> avocados. Go figure

    >
    >
    > There is guacamole and there is guacamole. It took me a while to become an
    > avocado fan and a guacamole fan. I enjoy avocados but they are expensive
    > here and IMO. not worth it.
    >
    > Our neighbours regularly have very large parties and a lot of the food is
    > brought by some Mexican friends of theirs. At one of their parties last
    > year the mother of the Mexican friends brought some guacamole that was
    > incredible. The avocado was just right, not all much. There was just the
    > right amount of garlic and heat. The winning ingredient was the cilantro.
    > It set a whole new scale for judging guacamole.



    Ugh! Cilantro! No thanks!

    Jill


  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On 20/11/2011 4:53 PM, jmcquown wrote:
    >
    >> There is guacamole and there is guacamole. It took me a while to
    >> become an avocado fan and a guacamole fan. I enjoy avocados but they
    >> are expensive here and IMO. not worth it.
    >>
    >> Our neighbours regularly have very large parties and a lot of the food
    >> is brought by some Mexican friends of theirs. At one of their parties
    >> last year the mother of the Mexican friends brought some guacamole
    >> that was incredible. The avocado was just right, not all much. There
    >> was just the right amount of garlic and heat. The winning ingredient
    >> was the cilantro. It set a whole new scale for judging guacamole.

    >
    >
    > Ugh! Cilantro! No thanks!
    >
    >




    LOL... Yeah. I know some people don't like it. But what can I say? It
    made a world of difference in the guacamole.


  6. #6
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 17:39:33 -0500, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >LOL... Yeah. I know some people don't like it. But what can I say? It
    >made a world of difference in the guacamole.


    Hmm..I can't imagine guacamole made without cilantro out here in the
    west...

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On 11/20/2011 3:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:

    >>> Our neighbours regularly have very large parties and a lot of the food
    >>> is brought by some Mexican friends of theirs. At one of their parties
    >>> last year the mother of the Mexican friends brought some guacamole
    >>> that was incredible. The avocado was just right, not all much. There
    >>> was just the right amount of garlic and heat. The winning ingredient
    >>> was the cilantro. It set a whole new scale for judging guacamole.

    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yeah. I know some people don't like it. But what can I say? It
    > made a world of difference in the guacamole.
    >



    It was an acquired taste for me.

    I, like many other folk, used to think cilantro tasted soapy. After a
    few years of eating it in Mexican and Asian cooking, I really like it
    now, even in fairly large amounts.

    gloria p


  8. #8
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On 2011-11-20, gloria.p <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I, like many other folk, used to think cilantro tasted soapy. After a
    > few years of eating it in Mexican and Asian cooking, I really like it
    > now, even in fairly large amounts.


    I think it's an acquired taste. I recall never having tasted cilantro
    till I was in my early 30s, despite CA having a huge hispanic
    population.

    Even more surprising was getting my first taste of cilantro from Taco
    Bell, of all places. They pretty much introduced the fajita to the
    eating public, believe it or not. Prior to that I'd never heard of
    either fajitas or cilantro. Perhaps it was served in Hispanic homes,
    but I never ran across it in eateries till I ordered the newly offered
    Steak Fajita at TB. I thought the lime/cilantro marinade was a bit
    weird, at first, but took to it in no time. Now, I can't imagine a
    dozen dishes, both Hispanic and Asian, without it.

    nb

  9. #9
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On 20/11/2011 6:42 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    > On 11/20/2011 3:39 PM, Dave Smith wrote:


    >
    > It was an acquired taste for me.
    >
    > I, like many other folk, used to think cilantro tasted soapy. After a
    > few years of eating it in Mexican and Asian cooking, I really like it
    > now, even in fairly large amounts.
    >


    I must be one of the few who acquired it the first time I tried it.

    For me, it is one of those herbs that, when used in the right amount,
    can make a good dish perfect. I gave the example of the neighbour`s
    friend`s guacamole. Another was a shrimp dish that I had in a local
    restaurant. MY thoughts at the time, and still, was that it was the
    perfect amount of cilantro. I still remember how good that dish was.






  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 16:42:26 -0700, "gloria.p" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > I, like many other folk, used to think cilantro tasted soapy. After a
    > few years of eating it in Mexican and Asian cooking, I really like it
    > now, even in fairly large amounts.


    You don't need cilantro in guacamole. I'm a cilantro fanatic and I
    don't add it. The only thing you *need* is a squirt or two of lime
    (or in my case, lemon).

    --

    Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

  11. #11
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On Sunday, November 20, 2011 11:41:43 AM UTC-7, Sqwertz wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 11:17:39 -0500, Jim Elbrecht wrote:
    >
    > > I learned the way to chose unknown produce is to hang out in the
    > > produce aisle and wait for a customer to come along that is taking a
    > > long time to pick the *right* one. So far they've all been more than
    > > happy to share tips on picking the good ones-- and how to prepare
    > > them.

    >
    > Since I'm often the only White guy the store and I guess they think I
    > look like I know what I'm doing, I get a lot of questions in the
    > veggie department at the large Asian grocer.
    >
    > Last week it was a lady holding up green onions asking if this was
    > lemongrass (ouch!). And then she asked for sawtooth herb and I
    > pointed her to the culuntro (NOT cilantro). I said she must be making
    > Vietanmese food. She said, "I don't know what the hell he's making.
    > My husband made this list. And this is the last time *I* do this!".
    >
    > Poor guy has to bring home the bacon and cook it, too.
    >
    > I often thought of holding Asian food shopping classes/tours for
    > gringos at this store. but since this shop carries everything from SE
    > Asia, I still have a few big holes when it comes to Japan/Indo/Malay
    > stuff. And all the Asian coffee, teas, bakery, and snacks. I could
    > still wing it.
    >
    > -sw


    You are "round eyes"...will never learn about all of the eastern condiments...you not smart enough.
    ==

  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge

    On 20/11/2011 9:54 PM, sf wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 16:42:26 -0700, "gloria.p"<[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> I, like many other folk, used to think cilantro tasted soapy. After a
    >> few years of eating it in Mexican and Asian cooking, I really like it
    >> now, even in fairly large amounts.

    >
    > You don't need cilantro in guacamole. I'm a cilantro fanatic and I
    > don't add it. The only thing you *need* is a squirt or two of lime
    > (or in my case, lemon).
    >



    That was the only time I was aware of their being cilantro in guacamole
    and I was impressed. Coincidentally, it was the first time I had
    guacamole made by a Mexican.

  13. #13
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Test Your Produce Knowledge


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 20 Nov 2011 17:39:33 -0500, Dave Smith
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>LOL... Yeah. I know some people don't like it. But what can I say? It
    >>made a world of difference in the guacamole.

    >
    > Hmm..I can't imagine guacamole made without cilantro out here in the
    > west...
    >
    > Christine
    > --
    > http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com



    Sure, Chris, but it seems like it's a staple out there. You have to *like*
    guacamole before you care about what ingredients are added to it

    Jill


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