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Thread: Re: Stroganoff

  1. #1
    telephone Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix. (Note: no tomatoes or
    paste added, I didn't have any on hand). Added liquid. One small can
    chicken stock, and about 3/4 can water. Simmered for one hour. I
    then tried something new. Instead of quartering mushrooms the way I
    used to, I put them in whole, and let simmer for another hour. Then
    added about 1 1/4 cup sour cream. Let it simmer slowly, very slowly
    for about 15 minutes. It turned out nice. I found it somewhat bland
    when served over noodles. So add a touch of salt, and it was very
    good. This was very simple and good. I personally didn't care much
    for the whole mushrooms, but my guest liked it more than if I had cut
    them up. I forgot garlic. But it was really good. I don't see too
    many recipes that use paprika in beef stroganoff. But that's how I
    was taught, and I like it. Note that I did not add anything to
    thicken, nor did I coat beef with flour. The sauce was a wee bit
    thinner than usual, the paprika does help to thicken a bit. But I
    don't mind a thin sauce. I think that all of that flour; who needs
    it? You can do this with white wine, or a mix of wine and chick
    stock, or beef stock. I've done that before, and it's good. I always
    use white, and never red wine in a stroganoff. Why? I don't know. I
    think it belongs here. It's a light colored sauce...? Oh yeah..I
    deglazed pan very thoroughly with a bit of cider vinegar, really
    scraping stuff off the bottom, between batches of meat, and also after
    onions were browned. You can use vino here too. Lemon/Lime juice...

  2. #2
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    telephone wrote:
    > I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    > strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    > brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    > batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    > Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    > too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    > Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    > beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.


    (snip ridiculous spillage)

    "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the sour
    cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.

    Jill


  3. #3
    telephone Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    On 2 Nov, 17:54, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > telephone wrote:
    > > I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). *Trimmed all fat. *Cut into
    > > strips. *Browned it off nicely in butter. *2 batches. *Butter was
    > > brown, but not black. *I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    > > batch. * Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    > > Slowly. *Until nice and brown. *Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    > > too much, just enough for a little oomph). *Added some mild Hungarian
    > > Paprika. *Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. *Added browned
    > > beef. *Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >
    > "spice mix'? *You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. *Where is the sour
    > cream? *At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >
    > Jill


    It's you who have no clue. I know how the original was made. This is
    not an original. "Where is the sour cream?" You didn't even read my
    post. Jill. Like **** off and croak. The only thing that comes to
    mind, is that you are jealous and overwhelmed by my post, because I
    know what I'm talking about. Otherwise you would not have attacked so
    ferociously. Get back in the kitchen, and learn how to cook. Better
    yet. Don't bother. You probably don't have the talent to be a
    shoemaker let alone a decent cook. Or don't you like new posters?
    Whatever. You obviously suffer from a weak ego problem so I'll let
    you alone now.

  4. #4
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    "telephone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On 2 Nov, 17:54, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >> telephone wrote:
    >>> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    >>> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    >>> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    >>> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    >>> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    >>> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    >>> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    >>> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >>
    >> (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >>
    >> "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the
    >> sour cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >>
    >> Jill

    >
    > It's you who have no clue. I know how the original was made. This is
    > not an original. "Where is the sour cream?" You didn't even read my
    > post. Jill. Like **** off and croak. The only thing that comes to
    > mind, is that you are jealous and overwhelmed by my post, because I
    > know what I'm talking about. Otherwise you would not have attacked so
    > ferociously. Get back in the kitchen, and learn how to cook. Better
    > yet. Don't bother. You probably don't have the talent to be a
    > shoemaker let alone a decent cook. Or don't you like new posters?
    > Whatever. You obviously suffer from a weak ego problem so I'll let
    > you alone now.


    It would really help if you would learn to punctuate and use paragraphs.

    --
    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland


  5. #5
    telephone Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    On 2 Nov, 18:18, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    > "telephone" <teleph...@hush.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]
    >
    >
    >
    > > On 2 Nov, 17:54, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > >> telephone wrote:
    > >>> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    > >>> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    > >>> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    > >>> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    > >>> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    > >>> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    > >>> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    > >>> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > >> (snip ridiculous spillage)

    >
    > >> "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the
    > >> sour cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.

    >
    > >> Jill

    >
    > > It's you who have no clue. *I know how the original was made. *Thisis
    > > not an original. *"Where is the sour cream?" *You didn't even read my
    > > post. *Jill. *Like **** off and croak. *The only thing that comesto
    > > mind, is that you are jealous and overwhelmed by my post, because I
    > > know what I'm talking about. *Otherwise you would not have attacked so
    > > ferociously. *Get back in the kitchen, and learn how to cook. *Better
    > > yet. *Don't bother. *You probably don't have the talent to be a
    > > shoemaker let alone a decent cook. *Or don't you like new posters?
    > > Whatever. *You obviously suffer from a weak ego problem so I'll let
    > > you alone now.

    >
    > It would really help if you would learn to punctuate and use paragraphs.
    >


    Oh a grammer boy. Thanks for the info. From now on, I'll make sure
    to use proper punctuation and paragraphing it if means so much to
    you. Normal people who love to cook don't usually give a darn about
    perfect grammer etc. As long as they can groove off each other it's
    ok. But for you, I'll make an extra effort. I don't want you to cry
    or anything. As an anal retentive, you must shed the odd tear now and
    then what?

  6. #6
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff


    "telephone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    You probably don't have the talent to be a
    shoemaker let alone a decent cook.

    Shoemaker? Do they even exist anymore? You try making a shoe from raw
    materials.



  7. #7
    telephone Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    On 2 Nov, 18:40, "dejablues" <dejabl...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "telephone" <teleph...@hush.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    > *You probably don't have the talent to be a
    > shoemaker let alone a decent cook.
    >
    > Shoemaker? Do they even exist anymore? *You try making a shoe from raw
    > materials.


    They are few and far between. They mostly do shoe repair work. Being
    told that one should be a shoemaker is actually an insult that
    tradespeople throw out when they are confronted with an inferior. In
    reality, a bona fide shoemaker is also skilled; although in a limited
    way. This 'insult' dates from the days when there were many
    shoemakers plying their wares. It's still used by tradesmen such as
    cooks, machinists, toolmakers, etc.

  8. #8
    dejablues Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff


    "telephone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On 2 Nov, 18:40, "dejablues" <dejabl...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > "telephone" <teleph...@hush.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    > You probably don't have the talent to be a
    > shoemaker let alone a decent cook.
    >
    > Shoemaker? Do they even exist anymore? You try making a shoe from raw
    > materials.


    >They are few and far between. They mostly do shoe repair work.


    I can think of two, and they also repair anything made of leather like
    belts, handbags, and luggage. Back in the day they probably repaired harness
    leather and saddlery as well.

    (As an aside, I heard a report on NPR about why ridiculously high heels are
    still being shown on catwalks in fashion shows. Apparently it's because
    designers know their clothing will be rapidly knocked-off with cheap copies
    mass-produced and sold, but they know that it is much more difficult to do
    that with a pair of shoes, so, if a fashion-conscious buyer wants that
    particular pair of shoes, they have to buy them from the original designer.)

    > Being
    >told that one should be a shoemaker is actually an insult that
    >tradespeople throw out when they are confronted with an inferior. In
    >reality, a bona fide shoemaker is also skilled; although in a limited
    >way. This 'insult' dates from the days when there were many
    >shoemakers plying their wares.


    That was a long time ago, when shoes were expensive, you only got a few
    pairs in your lifetime, and there weren't shoe factories in China churning
    out cheap shoes.

    >It's still used by tradesmen such as
    >cooks, machinists, toolmakers, etc.


    Probably just cooks. The only reference I found was this : "Chefs and cooks
    sometimes use the term "shoemaker" as an insult, implying that the chef in
    question has made his food as tough as shoe leather."
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoemaking

    Ah, the pecking order - why do we feel the need to insult those that we deem
    lower on the human totem pole, but still provide an indispensible service?
    The shoemakers, the garbage collectors, the sewage workers, the
    burger-flippers...
    I suppose everyone needs to feel that they are above someone else.



  9. #9
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    On Nov 2, 5:26*pm, telephone <teleph...@hush.com> wrote:
    > On 2 Nov, 18:18, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > "telephone" <teleph...@hush.com> wrote in message

    >
    > >news:[email protected]

    >
    > > > On 2 Nov, 17:54, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > > >> telephone wrote:
    > > >>> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    > > >>> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    > > >>> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    > > >>> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    > > >>> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    > > >>> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    > > >>> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    > > >>> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > > >> (snip ridiculous spillage)

    >
    > > >> "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the
    > > >> sour cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.

    >
    > > >> Jill

    >
    > > > It's you who have no clue. *I know how the original was made. *This is
    > > > not an original. *"Where is the sour cream?" *You didn't even read my
    > > > post. *Jill. *Like **** off and croak. *The only thing that comes to
    > > > mind, is that you are jealous and overwhelmed by my post, because I
    > > > know what I'm talking about. *Otherwise you would not have attackedso
    > > > ferociously. *Get back in the kitchen, and learn how to cook. *Better
    > > > yet. *Don't bother. *You probably don't have the talent to be a
    > > > shoemaker let alone a decent cook. *Or don't you like new posters?
    > > > Whatever. *You obviously suffer from a weak ego problem so I'll let
    > > > you alone now.

    >
    > > It would really help if you would learn to punctuate and use paragraphs..

    >
    > Oh a grammer boy. *Thanks for the info. *From now on, I'll make sure
    > to use proper punctuation and paragraphing it if means so much to
    > you. *Normal people who love to cook don't usually give a darn about
    > perfect grammer etc. *As long as they can groove off each other it's
    > ok. *But for you, I'll make an extra effort. *I don't want you to cry
    > or anything. *As an anal retentive, you must shed the odd tear now and
    > then what?

    =================================
    Dear "telephone",
    I beg your pardon! I am an excellent cook and a published food
    writer. I've neen posting on r.f.c. for many years. I use good
    grammar, proper spelling AND I have manners. Clean up your act.

    Lynn Gifford
    Fargo North Dakota
    yes, that's my real name . . . what's yours?

  10. #10
    MareCat Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > telephone wrote:
    >> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    >> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    >> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    >> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    >> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    >> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    >> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    >> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >
    > "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff.


    The "spice mix" was a mixture of hot and mild Hungarian paprika, I think?


    > Where is the sour cream?


    "Added liquid. One small can
    chicken stock, and about 3/4 can water. Simmered for one hour. I
    then tried something new. Instead of quartering mushrooms the way I
    used to, I put them in whole, and let simmer for another hour. Then
    added about 1 1/4 cup sour cream. Let it simmer slowly, very slowly
    for about 15 minutes......."

    Sounds like a nice enough recipe to me. <shrug>

    Mary



  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 19:39:24 -0500, "dejablues" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ah, the pecking order - why do we feel the need to insult those that we deem
    >lower on the human totem pole, but still provide an indispensible service?
    >The shoemakers, the garbage collectors, the sewage workers, the
    >burger-flippers...
    >I suppose everyone needs to feel that they are above someone else.


    Custom shoe makers make a very good living these days!


    --
    I never worry about diets. The only carrots that
    interest me are the number of carats in a diamond.

    Mae West

  12. #12
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in news:6n6pdsFj9pt5U1
    @mid.individual.net:

    > telephone wrote:
    >> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    >> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    >> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    >> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    >> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    >> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    >> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    >> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >
    > "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the sour
    > cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >
    > Jill
    >
    >


    Ground beef woulda been better than round steak at least it has some taste
    to it.. Round steak has no taste at all; way too bland. Chuck or sirlon
    woulda been way better. Brisket rules for stroganoff as it does for most
    braised beef dishes.

    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  13. #13
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    "James Silverton" <[email protected]> wrote in news:BzqPk.2359
    $[email protected]:

    > "telephone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> On 2 Nov, 17:54, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    >>> telephone wrote:
    >>>> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    >>>> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    >>>> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    >>>> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    >>>> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    >>>> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    >>>> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    >>>> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.
    >>>
    >>> (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >>>
    >>> "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the
    >>> sour cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >>
    >> It's you who have no clue. I know how the original was made. This is
    >> not an original. "Where is the sour cream?" You didn't even read my
    >> post. Jill. Like **** off and croak. The only thing that comes to
    >> mind, is that you are jealous and overwhelmed by my post, because I
    >> know what I'm talking about. Otherwise you would not have attacked so
    >> ferociously. Get back in the kitchen, and learn how to cook. Better
    >> yet. Don't bother. You probably don't have the talent to be a
    >> shoemaker let alone a decent cook. Or don't you like new posters?
    >> Whatever. You obviously suffer from a weak ego problem so I'll let
    >> you alone now.

    >
    > It would really help if you would learn to punctuate and use paragraphs.
    >


    It would really help if he had a clue.

    --

    The beet goes on -Alan




  14. #14
    Theron Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff


    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > telephone wrote:
    >> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    >> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    >> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    >> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    >> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    >> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    >> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    >> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >
    > "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the sour
    > cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >
    > Jill

    I thought the same. As I've done, you should use only tenderloin and lightly
    cook it in the sauce very briefly. Then I came up with the following URL.
    http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodmeat...beefstroganoff When the page
    comes up hit Beef Stroganoff. I found that quite interesting, with all sorts
    of recipe definitions.

    As life goes on,

    Theron




  15. #15
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    On Sun, 2 Nov 2008 20:25:10 -0800, Theron wrote:

    > "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> telephone wrote:
    >>> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    >>> strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    >>> brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    >>> batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    >>> Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    >>> too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    >>> Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    >>> beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >>
    >> (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >>
    >> "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the sour
    >> cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >>
    >> Jill

    > I thought the same. As I've done, you should use only tenderloin and lightly
    > cook it in the sauce very briefly. Then I came up with the following URL.
    > http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodmeat...beefstroganoff When the page
    > comes up hit Beef Stroganoff. I found that quite interesting, with all sorts
    > of recipe definitions.
    >
    > As life goes on,
    >
    > Theron


    i, too, thought it was a quick sauté. but i guess if you're using round
    rather than tenderloin, adjustments must be made.

    your pal,
    blake

  16. #16
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    blake wrote on Mon, 03 Nov 2008 14:24:36 GMT:

    >> "jmcquown" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> telephone wrote:
    >>>> I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat.
    >>>> Cut into strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2
    >>>> batches. Butter was brown, but not black. I added a
    >>>> little olive oil to the butter 2nd batch. Browned one
    >>>> yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse) Slowly. Until
    >>>> nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not too
    >>>> much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild
    >>>> Hungarian Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10
    >>>> minutes. Added browned beef. Coated with the onion and
    >>>> spice mix.
    >>>
    >>> (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >>>
    >>> "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where
    >>> is the sour cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >>>
    >>> Jill

    >> I thought the same. As I've done, you should use only
    >> tenderloin and lightly cook it in the sauce very briefly.
    >> Then I came up with the following URL.
    >> http://www.foodtimeline.org/foodmeat...beefstroganoff When the
    >> page comes
    >> up hit Beef Stroganoff. I found that quite interesting, with
    >> all sorts of recipe definitions.
    >>
    >> As life goes on,
    >>
    >> Theron


    > i, too, thought it was a quick sauté. but i guess if you're
    > using round rather than tenderloin, adjustments must be made.


    My understanding of the original Beef Stroganoff recipe was that it used
    high quality lean beef cooked only until rare before the sour cream was
    added. There would not be much more cooking as the sour cream warmed up.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  17. #17
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff


    "James Silverton" schrieb :
    <snip>
    > My understanding of the original Beef Stroganoff recipe was that it used high
    > quality lean beef cooked only until rare before the sour cream was added.
    > There would not be much more cooking as the sour cream warmed up.
    >

    Yes. The recipe was invented to use up beef-filet tips which were too small
    for steaks.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  18. #18
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff

    Michael Kuettner wrote:
    > "James Silverton" schrieb :
    > <snip>
    >> My understanding of the original Beef Stroganoff recipe was that it
    >> used high quality lean beef cooked only until rare before the sour
    >> cream was added. There would not be much more cooking as the sour
    >> cream warmed up.

    > Yes. The recipe was invented to use up beef-filet tips which were too
    > small for steaks.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Michael Kuettner



    Yep. My mother's recipe always called for beef tenderloin, thinly sliced.
    The sour cream is stirred in at the very end only until just heated through.
    Our friend "telephone" doesn't know how to cook this dish.

    Jill


  19. #19
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff


    "telephone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On 2 Nov, 17:54, "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > telephone wrote:
    > > I purchased a whole round steak (2 lbs.). Trimmed all fat. Cut into
    > > strips. Browned it off nicely in butter. 2 batches. Butter was
    > > brown, but not black. I added a little olive oil to the butter 2nd
    > > batch. Browned one yellow onion + 1/3.(chopped medium coarse)
    > > Slowly. Until nice and brown. Added some Hot Hungarian Paprika (not
    > > too much, just enough for a little oomph). Added some mild Hungarian
    > > Paprika. Let it slowly saute' for about 10 minutes. Added browned
    > > beef. Coated with the onion and spice mix.

    >
    > (snip ridiculous spillage)
    >
    > "spice mix'? You have no clue about Beef Stroganoff. Where is the sour
    > cream? At least you didn't use ground beef.
    >
    > Jill


    It's you who have no clue. I know how the original was made. This is
    not an original. "Where is the sour cream?" You didn't even read my
    post. Jill. Like **** off and croak. The only thing that comes to
    mind, is that you are jealous and overwhelmed by my post, because I
    know what I'm talking about. Otherwise you would not have attacked so
    ferociously. Get back in the kitchen, and learn how to cook. Better
    yet. Don't bother. You probably don't have the talent to be a
    shoemaker let alone a decent cook. Or don't you like new posters?
    Whatever. You obviously suffer from a weak ego problem so I'll let
    you alone now.

    Next time get Hamburger helper - you're an idiot and Jill could cook circles
    around you blindfolded.

    Dimitri

    Beef Stroganoff
    The origin and history of Beef Stroganoff is an excellent lesson in food
    lore. While food historians generally agree the dish takes its name from
    Count Stroganoff, a 19th century Russian noble, there are conflicting
    theories regarding the genesis of this "classic" dish. Certainly, there is
    evidence confirming the recipe predate the good Count and his esteemed chef.
    "Despite the allusion of the name "stroganoff" to Count Paul Stroganoff, a
    19th century Russian diplomat, the origins of the dish have never been
    confirmed. Larousse Gastronomique notes that similar dishes were known since
    the 18th century but insists the dish by this specific name was the creation
    of chef Charles Briere who was working in St. Petersburg when he submitted
    the recipe to L 'Art Culinaire in 1891, but the dish seems much older. It
    did not appear in English cookbooks until 1932, and it was not until the
    1940s that beef stroganoff became popular for elegant dinner parties in
    America."
    ---Restaurant Hospitality, John Mariani, January 1999 (p. 76).
    "Unlike the French, who name dishes after the chefs who devised them, the
    Russians have usually attached the names of famous households to their
    cuisine--the cooks were usually serfs. For example, we have Beef Stroganoff,
    Veal Orlov, and Bagration Soup. One of the few exceptions is a cutlet of
    poultry of real named after Pozharskii, a famous tavern keeper...The last
    prominent scion of the dynasty, Count Pavel Stroganoff, was a celebrity in
    turn-of-the-century St. Petersburg, a dignitary at the court of Alexander
    III, a member of the Imperial Academy of Arts, and a gourmet. It is doubtful
    that Beef Stroganoff was his or his chef's invention since the recipe was
    included in the 1871 edition of the Molokhovets cookbook...which predates
    his fame as a gourmet. Not a new recipe, by the way, but a refined version
    of an even older Russian recipe, it had probably been in the family for some
    years and became well known through Pavel Stroganoff's love of
    entertaining."
    ---The Art of Russian Cuisine, Anne Volokh with Mavis Manus [Macmillan:New
    York] 1983 (p. 266)
    "Beef stroganoff is a dish consisting of strips of lean beef sauteed and
    served in a sour-cream sauce with onions and mushrooms. The recipe, which is
    of Russian origin, has been known since the eighteenth century, but its name
    appears to come from County Paul Stroganoff, a nineteeth-century Russian
    diplomat. Legend has it that when he was stationed in deepest Siberia, his
    chef discovered that the beef was frozen so solid that it could only be
    coped with by cutting it into very thin strips. The first English cookery
    book to include it seems to have been Ambrose Heath's Good Food (1932)."
    ---An A-Z of Food & Drink, John Ayto [Oxford University Press:Oxford] 2002
    (p. 326-7)
    "Count Pavel Stroganov, a celebrity in turn-of-the-century St. Petersburg,
    was a noted gourmet as well as a friend of Alexander III. He is frequently
    credited with creating Beef Stroganoff or having a chef who did so, but in
    fact a recipe by that name appears in a cookbook published in 1871, well
    ahead of the heyday of the genial count. In all probability the dish had
    been in the family for some years and came to more general notice throughout
    Pavel's love of entertaining."
    --Rare Bits: Unusual Origins of Popular Recipes, Patricia Bunning Stevens
    [Ohio University Press:Athens] 1998 (p.103).


  20. #20
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Stroganoff


    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    news:[email protected]..
    > Michael Kuettner wrote:
    >> "James Silverton" schrieb :
    >> <snip>
    >>> My understanding of the original Beef Stroganoff recipe was that it
    >>> used high quality lean beef cooked only until rare before the sour
    >>> cream was added. There would not be much more cooking as the sour
    >>> cream warmed up.

    >> Yes. The recipe was invented to use up beef-filet tips which were too
    >> small for steaks.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Yep. My mother's recipe always called for beef tenderloin, thinly sliced. The
    > sour cream is stirred in at the very end only until just heated through. Our
    > friend "telephone" doesn't know how to cook this dish.
    >

    It looked like a abortive attempt at gulasch while on LSD ;-)

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner




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