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Thread: Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

  1. #1
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > So far I have only made ham and mayocoba bean(*) soup and it was quite
    > addictive as well. Any other ideas fvor the ham and the new-to-me
    > bean (a pretty good bean, IMO)?


    I've never heard of that bean. If I had heard the name out of context I
    would also have assumed some sort of microbe. ;-)

    >I have a lot of ham to use in small
    > quantities. Final weight was about 8 pounds (it started at 13).


    I wonder how well it will keep now that it's been cut. The high salt content
    should help.

    > Now I know where Sheldon got his archaic idea that ham is meant to be
    > used as a seasoning and not be eaten in slabs at a time.


    Burger's Smokehouse distributes packs of country ham in small pieces for
    exactly that purpose and it's damn good with all sorts of beans, green and
    otherwise. (They also have pieces of smoked pork jowl packed that way...
    yum!)

    I had one of their country hams and stuck it in a pantry for a while but
    when I went back, found it had been touching a large pan and developed a wet
    spot. Called and they said it shouldn't be a problem but close inspection
    convinced me it had penetrated the meat so I tossed it. My bad, the
    instructions specifically state to hang it and not let it touch stuff.

    Mundane, but you could probably make a pretty interesting version of ham
    salad. Layering it in with some onions in scalloped potatoes would be good
    too. You shouldn't need any extra salt. ;-)

    Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?

    > And no, Kent. Smithfield ham is not comparable to a fine proscuitto
    > or serrano ham.


    Now you've done it. But maybe this will get him off his silly demi-glace
    rant in AFB.

    MartyB



  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 12:37:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?


    Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  3. #3
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 12:37:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?

    >
    > Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.


    See country ham aka smithfield ham. Exceedingly salty, and soaking is a
    universal requirement for preparing it. Steve soaked five days before the
    initial cooking. Even with the soaking the soup it shouldn't need any added
    salt. If you don't soak then you risk overwhelming anything it touches.

    MartyB



  4. #4
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > The whole ham was soaked for 5 days. I don't think it does much to
    > relieve the salt content.


    If you change the water from time to time, it would.

  5. #5
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    Nunya Bidnits <[email protected]> wrote:

    >sf <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.


    >See country ham aka smithfield ham. Exceedingly salty, and soaking is a
    >universal requirement for preparing it.


    If there a nutritional information label that says how much sodium is
    in it? If so, then you can calculate whether the built-in saltiness
    of the ham will exceed the desired salt level of your preparation.



    Steve

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 14:51:54 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 12:37:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?

    > >
    > > Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.

    >
    > See country ham aka smithfield ham. Exceedingly salty, and soaking is a
    > universal requirement for preparing it. Steve soaked five days before the
    > initial cooking. Even with the soaking the soup it shouldn't need any added
    > salt. If you don't soak then you risk overwhelming anything it touches.
    >

    Where in the above quote is the conversation about cooking a whole
    Smithfield ham in a pot of beans? I'm talking about cooking beans
    with some ham - which in my experience is a way to use *leftover* ham.
    Do what you need to do to make it palatable to eat all by itself, but
    since you want to fight about this... I bet an unsoaked hunk in the
    mini-quantity that people normally use to flavor beans would be just
    fine.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 13:03:58 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Sqwertz wrote:
    > >
    > > The whole ham was soaked for 5 days. I don't think it does much to
    > > relieve the salt content.

    >
    > If you change the water from time to time, it would.


    Absolutely! You won't need 5 days to leach out so much salt that it
    renders out all flavor and makes the preservation process pointless.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  8. #8
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 14:51:54 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 12:37:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?
    >>>
    >>> Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.

    >>
    >> See country ham aka smithfield ham. Exceedingly salty, and soaking
    >> is a universal requirement for preparing it. Steve soaked five days
    >> before the initial cooking. Even with the soaking the soup it
    >> shouldn't need any added salt. If you don't soak then you risk
    >> overwhelming anything it touches.
    >>

    > Where in the above quote is the conversation about cooking a whole
    > Smithfield ham in a pot of beans?


    WTF? Where did anyone say put the whole thing in there? You need to quit
    making things up and attributing them to me.

    >I'm talking about cooking beans
    > with some ham - which in my experience is a way to use *leftover* ham.
    > Do what you need to do to make it palatable to eat all by itself, but
    > since you want to fight about this...


    Now that's pretty funny. You seem to have developed a communication problem
    recently.

    >I bet an unsoaked hunk in the
    > mini-quantity that people normally use to flavor beans would be just
    > fine.


    And you don't just cut into an unsoaked uncooked whole smithfield/country
    ham and use it raw unless you just don't know what you are doing.

    MartyB



  9. #9
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 13:03:58 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> Sqwertz wrote:
    >>>
    >>> The whole ham was soaked for 5 days. I don't think it does much to
    >>> relieve the salt content.

    >>
    >> If you change the water from time to time, it would.

    >
    > Absolutely! You won't need 5 days to leach out so much salt that it
    > renders out all flavor and makes the preservation process pointless.


    And when is the last time you prepared and used a whole country ham? It
    sounds like the answer is never.



  10. #10
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 23:02:03 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 14:51:54 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>> On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 12:37:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>>> Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?
    > >>>
    > >>> Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.
    > >>
    > >> See country ham aka smithfield ham. Exceedingly salty, and soaking
    > >> is a universal requirement for preparing it. Steve soaked five days
    > >> before the initial cooking. Even with the soaking the soup it
    > >> shouldn't need any added salt. If you don't soak then you risk
    > >> overwhelming anything it touches.
    > >>

    > > Where in the above quote is the conversation about cooking a whole
    > > Smithfield ham in a pot of beans?

    >
    > WTF? Where did anyone say put the whole thing in there? You need to quit
    > making things up and attributing them to me.


    Oh?? No other conclusion could be drawn to make any sense out of what
    you said.
    >
    > >I'm talking about cooking beans
    > > with some ham - which in my experience is a way to use *leftover* ham.
    > > Do what you need to do to make it palatable to eat all by itself, but
    > > since you want to fight about this...

    >
    > Now that's pretty funny. You seem to have developed a communication problem
    > recently.
    >
    > >I bet an unsoaked hunk in the
    > > mini-quantity that people normally use to flavor beans would be just
    > > fine.

    >
    > And you don't just cut into an unsoaked uncooked whole smithfield/country
    > ham and use it raw unless you just don't know what you are doing.
    >

    No reason not to. The meat would cook while the beans cook.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  11. #11
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 23:03:20 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 13:03:58 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    > > wrote:
    > >
    > >> Sqwertz wrote:
    > >>>
    > >>> The whole ham was soaked for 5 days. I don't think it does much to
    > >>> relieve the salt content.
    > >>
    > >> If you change the water from time to time, it would.

    > >
    > > Absolutely! You won't need 5 days to leach out so much salt that it
    > > renders out all flavor and makes the preservation process pointless.

    >
    > And when is the last time you prepared and used a whole country ham? It
    > sounds like the answer is never.
    >

    Once and never again.

    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  12. #12
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 23:02:03 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 14:51:54 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >> > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>> On Thu, 15 Dec 2011 12:37:16 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >> >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>>
    >> >>>> Did you soak the ham before putting it in the beans?
    >> >>>
    >> >>> Beans need salt, so there's no need to soak.
    >> >>
    >> >> See country ham aka smithfield ham. Exceedingly salty, and soaking
    >> >> is a universal requirement for preparing it. Steve soaked five days
    >> >> before the initial cooking. Even with the soaking the soup it
    >> >> shouldn't need any added salt. If you don't soak then you risk
    >> >> overwhelming anything it touches.
    >> >>
    >> > Where in the above quote is the conversation about cooking a whole
    >> > Smithfield ham in a pot of beans?

    >>
    >> WTF? Where did anyone say put the whole thing in there? You need to quit
    >> making things up and attributing them to me.

    >
    > Oh?? No other conclusion could be drawn to make any sense out of what
    > you said.
    >>
    >> >I'm talking about cooking beans
    >> > with some ham - which in my experience is a way to use *leftover* ham.
    >> > Do what you need to do to make it palatable to eat all by itself, but
    >> > since you want to fight about this...

    >>
    >> Now that's pretty funny. You seem to have developed a communication
    >> problem
    >> recently.
    >>
    >> >I bet an unsoaked hunk in the
    >> > mini-quantity that people normally use to flavor beans would be just
    >> > fine.

    >>
    >> And you don't just cut into an unsoaked uncooked whole smithfield/country
    >> ham and use it raw unless you just don't know what you are doing.
    >>

    > No reason not to. The meat would cook while the beans cook.


    I rest my case.



  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 08:47:15 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <nunyabidnits@eterna[email protected]> wrote:

    > I rest my case.
    >

    What case?
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  14. #14
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf wrote:
    > "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >> Sqwertz wrote:

    >
    >> >>> The whole ham was soaked for 5 days. I don't think it does much to
    >> >>> relieve the salt content.

    >
    >> >> If you change the water from time to time, it would.

    >
    >> > Absolutely! You won't need 5 days to leach out so much salt that it
    >> > renders out all flavor and makes the preservation process pointless.

    >>
    >> And when is the last time you prepared and used a whole country ham? It
    >> sounds like the answer is never.

    >
    > Once and never again.


    Same here. Once we bought a whole country ham and prepared it according
    to the directions. Cut off the rind, soak it for days, bake it. The
    result was hardly any different from a wet cured city ham. It was okay
    but I can get a city ham on sale at any grocery store without all of
    that effort.

    Ever since I've used country ham with the salt. A brief rinse does
    effect the salt level for very thin slices. A couple of hours of soak
    does effect the salt level for small diced pieces. Getting rid of the
    salt also reduces the unique flavor of a dry cured ham so it's a trade
    off. I mostly go with more salt and more falvor which means I mostly go
    with a smaller amount of country ham. It's an ingredient for me not a
    main course item because of this.

  15. #15
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 17:43:10 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I mostly go with more salt and more falvor which means I mostly go
    > with a smaller amount of country ham. It's an ingredient for me not a
    > main course item because of this.


    Are you able to just buy pieces or do you have to buy the entire
    thing?
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  16. #16
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 08:47:15 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I rest my case.
    >>

    > What case?


    The one I rested.



  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 12:04:43 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 08:47:15 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I rest my case.
    > >>

    > > What case?

    >
    > The one I rested.
    >

    It's that tired?
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 12:04:43 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 08:47:15 -0600, "Nunya Bidnits"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I rest my case.
    >>>>
    >>> What case?

    >>
    >> The one I rested.
    >>

    > It's that tired?


    No, it's well rested.



  19. #19
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    sf wrote:
    > Doug Freyburger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I mostly go with more salt and more flavor which means I mostly go
    >> with a smaller amount of country ham. It's an ingredient for me not a
    >> main course item because of this.

    >
    > Are you able to just buy pieces or do you have to buy the entire
    > thing?


    Half country hams are consistantly available at Cracker Barrel
    restaurant/stores. There's one in easy driving range from where I live.
    I only see them in stores when travelling south of St Louis to visit one
    of the kids.

    Steak sized slices and packages of prediced country ham are
    inconsistantly at Cracker Barrel. I rarely see them in groceries. They
    were a common grocery store item back when we lived in North Carolina
    but that's now a long time ago.

    So I get the pieces when I can, the half ham size about once per year.
    It freezes well so I get the big one, cut it up, freeze and wrap the
    pieces, use them gradually.

  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Smithfield Ham Complete

    On Fri, 16 Dec 2011 19:50:37 +0000 (UTC), Doug Freyburger
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > So I get the pieces when I can, the half ham size about once per year.
    > It freezes well so I get the big one, cut it up, freeze and wrap the
    > pieces, use them gradually.


    I'd do that if I had the opportunity. I don't use much ham per year.
    --

    Ham and eggs.
    A day's work for a chicken, a lifetime commitment for a pig.

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