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Thread: Re: Seattle Bag Tax

  1. #1
    squirltop Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax



    Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    > Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    > attention.
    >
    > For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used them
    > (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners. They work
    > much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out something wet
    > and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where the plastic trash
    > bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought plastic trash bags for
    > years. And that's not just me, but quite a few people I know do the
    > same.
    >
    > So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    > persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    > buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain if
    > the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can liners?
    >
    > Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?
    >
    > --
    > Paul Hovnanian mailto:[email protected]
    > ------------------------------------------------------------------
    > When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl.
    > -- Etaoin Shrdlu



    Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    it in the freezer. Would use reusable canvas bags and all but never
    really know how much we will get at the store

  2. #2
    Doug Brown Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    "squirltop" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    >> Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    >> attention.
    >>
    >> For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used them
    >> (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners. They work
    >> much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out something wet
    >> and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where the plastic trash
    >> bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought plastic trash bags for
    >> years. And that's not just me, but quite a few people I know do the
    >> same.
    >>
    >> So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    >> persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    >> buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain if
    >> the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can liners?
    >>
    >> Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Paul Hovnanian mailto:[email protected]
    >> ------------------------------------------------------------------
    >> When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl.
    >> -- Etaoin Shrdlu

    I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic bags actually
    degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the anerobic nature of
    most modern landfills creates conditions where organics simply do not
    biodegrade and the result is that the plastic bag, paper plates and
    hamburger will still be there 1000's of years from now.



  3. #3
    The Daring Dufas Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Doug Brown wrote:
    > "squirltop" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    >>> Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    >>> attention.
    >>>
    >>> For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used them
    >>> (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners. They work
    >>> much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out something wet
    >>> and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where the plastic trash
    >>> bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought plastic trash bags for
    >>> years. And that's not just me, but quite a few people I know do the
    >>> same.
    >>>
    >>> So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    >>> persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    >>> buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain if
    >>> the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can liners?
    >>>
    >>> Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Paul Hovnanian mailto:[email protected]
    >>> ------------------------------------------------------------------
    >>> When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl.
    >>> -- Etaoin Shrdlu

    > I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic bags actually
    > degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the anerobic nature of
    > most modern landfills creates conditions where organics simply do not
    > biodegrade and the result is that the plastic bag, paper plates and
    > hamburger will still be there 1000's of years from now.
    >
    >


    The archaeologists are gonna have a lot of fun with us. Some
    have already started digging up 20th century landfills.

    TDD

  4. #4
    Bob F Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    squirltop wrote:
    > Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    >> Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    >> attention.
    >>
    >> For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used
    >> them (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners.
    >> They work much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out
    >> something wet and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where
    >> the plastic trash bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought
    >> plastic trash bags for years. And that's not just me, but quite a
    >> few people I know do the same.
    >>
    >> So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    >> persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    >> buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain
    >> if the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can
    >> liners?
    >>
    >> Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Paul Hovnanian mailto:[email protected]
    >> ------------------------------------------------------------------
    >> When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl.
    >> -- Etaoin Shrdlu

    >
    >
    > Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    > trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    > it in the freezer.


    I do that, but now have 7 freezers full of smelly garbage.

    There's got to be a better way.



  5. #5
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    squirltop <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    > > Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    > > attention.
    > >
    > > For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used them
    > > (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners. They work
    > > much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out something wet
    > > and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where the plastic trash
    > > bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought plastic trash bags for
    > > years. And that's not just me, but quite a few people I know do the
    > > same.
    > >
    > > So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    > > persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    > > buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain if
    > > the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can liners?
    > >
    > > Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?

    >
    > Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    > trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    > it in the freezer. Would use reusable canvas bags and all but never
    > really know how much we will get at the store


    Plastic bags are 5c each at the checkout in some chains here. We rarely
    bother with them, but occasionally pick up one or two to use as rubbish
    bags.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  6. #6
    Rhonda Anderson Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Miche <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > squirltop <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    >> trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    >> it in the freezer. Would use reusable canvas bags and all but never
    >> really know how much we will get at the store

    >
    > Plastic bags are 5c each at the checkout in some chains here. We
    > rarely bother with them, but occasionally pick up one or two to use as
    > rubbish bags.
    >
    > Miche
    >


    Major supermarket chains in NSW still provide plastic bags, though I'm
    sure that will change at some stage. Some other stores- Target, Borders,
    eg.- charge for plastic bags. They of course sell their store branded
    reusable bags :-)

    I try to limit my use of the plastic ones. If I'm heading in to do
    grocery shopping I'll make sure I have all my reusable ones with me. But
    sometimes I don't know beforehand that I'm going to stop at the
    supermarket on the way home from work. I don't drive, so can't do the
    recommended trick of keeping them in the boot. Need to get some of the
    ones that fold up small and keep them in any bag I might carry to work.

    I've always reused the shopping bags, though have also purchased garbage
    bags (I buy the biodegradable ones). Use of those for our garbage is
    becoming limited though.

    Our council has gone from a 2 bin (recycling and rubbish) system to a 3
    bin one. One for organics (garden waste, all food waste including meat,
    pet waste etc.) and that can't have any plastic bags in it. You can wrap
    your waste in paper but not plasic. That's emptied weekly.

    The recycling one remains (cans/bottles/paper etc). It is emptied
    fortnightly, alternating weeks with a small residual rubbish bin. That
    has caused some letters to the editor in the local press. Disposable
    nappies have to go in the residual bin, so there's been a lot of people
    complaining about stinky bins being emptied fortnightly.

    --
    Rhonda Anderson
    Cranebrook, NSW, Australia

    Core of my heart, my country! Land of the rainbow gold,
    For flood and fire and famine she pays us back threefold.
    My Country, Dorothea MacKellar, 1904


  7. #7
    Stormin Mormon Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    I wonder how many otherwise servicable items have been
    landfilled. Automobiles, shavers, toasters, and maybe the
    occasional tommy gun from the prohibition era. Some states
    like Arizona are dry enough that the landfills are still
    pristine, if some what dessicated.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    "The Daring Dufas" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:h6vofa$ht4$[email protected]..
    > I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic
    > bags actually
    > degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the
    > anerobic nature of
    > most modern landfills creates conditions where organics
    > simply do not
    > biodegrade and the result is that the plastic bag, paper
    > plates and
    > hamburger will still be there 1000's of years from now.
    >
    >


    The archaeologists are gonna have a lot of fun with us. Some
    have already started digging up 20th century landfills.

    TDD



  8. #8
    HeyBub Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Doug Brown wrote:
    > I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic bags
    > actually degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the
    > anerobic nature of most modern landfills creates conditions where
    > organics simply do not biodegrade and the result is that the plastic
    > bag, paper plates and hamburger will still be there 1000's of years
    > from now.


    SOME of it is degrading - there's a market in harvesting Methane from
    landfills.



  9. #9
    HeyBub Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Bob F wrote:
    >>
    >> Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    >> trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    >> it in the freezer.

    >
    > I do that, but now have 7 freezers full of smelly garbage.
    >
    > There's got to be a better way.


    Think: "Be Neighborly!"



  10. #10
    HeyBub Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Miche wrote:
    >>
    >> Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    >> trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    >> it in the freezer. Would use reusable canvas bags and all but never
    >> really know how much we will get at the store

    >
    > Plastic bags are 5c each at the checkout in some chains here. We
    > rarely bother with them, but occasionally pick up one or two to use
    > as rubbish bags.
    >


    Saw a Home Depot droid on a morning TV program demonstrating paint
    application devices. The only thing I got out of the demo was when he showed
    how you could use a Home Depot plastic bag as a seal when putting the lid
    back on a paint can.

    'Course he pointed out this only worked with HOME DEPOT plastic bags...



  11. #11
    stan Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    On Aug 25, 4:37*am, Miche <michei...@gee-mail.com> wrote:
    ..
    > Electricians do it in three phases- Hide quoted text -

    ..
    That's shocking!

  12. #12
    stan Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    On Aug 25, 2:14*am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky.net>
    wrote:
    >
    > The archaeologists are gonna have a lot of fun with us. Some
    > have already started digging up 20th century landfills.


    Thinking that in future time humans will be mining existing garbage
    dumps and 'recovering' the minerals?
    Right now enough wood goes to our local dump to heat not only city
    hall but many homes at same time.
    We are very much a throw-away society!

  13. #13
    benick Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax


    "squirltop" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    >
    > Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    >> Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    >> attention.
    >>
    >> For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used them
    >> (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners. They work
    >> much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out something wet
    >> and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where the plastic trash
    >> bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought plastic trash bags for
    >> years. And that's not just me, but quite a few people I know do the
    >> same.
    >>
    >> So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    >> persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    >> buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain if
    >> the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can liners?
    >>
    >> Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?
    >>
    >> --
    >> Paul Hovnanian mailto:[email protected]
    >> ------------------------------------------------------------------
    >> When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl.
    >> -- Etaoin Shrdlu

    >

    The Moonbat Libs tried to pass the "bag tax" here in Maine last year to get
    folks to stop using them as well but due to public outcry it was
    dropped...They get re-used for EVERYTHING...Couldn't be more green...LOL

    As a side note the tax was more about getting for funding for Maine's FAILED
    publicly funded healthcare (Dirigo) then it was about being green...FWIW....


  14. #14
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Doug Brown wrote:

    > I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic bags actually
    > degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the anerobic nature of
    > most modern landfills creates conditions where organics simply do not
    > biodegrade and the result is that the plastic bag, paper plates and
    > hamburger will still be there 1000's of years from now.
    >
    >


    Perhaps by then someone will figure out how to create fuel from the
    trash, the ultimate recycling.

    gloria p

  15. #15
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Gloria P wrote:
    > Doug Brown wrote:
    >
    >> I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic bags
    >> actually degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the
    >> anerobic nature of most modern landfills creates conditions where
    >> organics simply do not biodegrade and the result is that the plastic
    >> bag, paper plates and hamburger will still be there 1000's of years
    >> from now.
    >>

    >
    > Perhaps by then someone will figure out how to create fuel from the
    > trash, the ultimate recycling.
    >
    > gloria p


    Many venues do just that Gloria, all incoming trash is incinerated to
    produce electricity. For those that worry about carbon release, the
    majority of those incinerators are fitted with emissions scrubbers,
    including carbon. That's one way to handle the trash flow.

    The local landfills here are built with all the latest technology for
    stopping groundwater contamination and are also built with the piping in
    place for methane recovery from the rotting trash. That is then
    scrubbed, dried, and put into use as a fuel for various purposes.

  16. #16
    benick Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax


    "stan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Aug 25, 2:14 am, The Daring Dufas <the-daring-du...@stinky.net>
    wrote:
    >
    > The archaeologists are gonna have a lot of fun with us. Some
    > have already started digging up 20th century landfills.


    Thinking that in future time humans will be mining existing garbage
    dumps and 'recovering' the minerals?
    Right now enough wood goes to our local dump to heat not only city
    hall but many homes at same time.
    We are very much a throw-away society!

    That is changing....Here in Maine we have 2 large trash incinerators that
    burn trash to make power. They are large enough that we import trash....The
    stacks have scrubbers and little or no pollution escapes..Several Biomass
    (wood chips) Boilers that produce power have started up as well with
    scrubber stacks....A local White Pine lumber mill (Robbins Lumber) has a
    boiler that burns all the waste (bark , sawdust , ect. ) and produces it's
    own power and manages to sell some as well...


  17. #17
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    On Tue, 25 Aug 2009 09:32:43 -0600, Gloria P <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Doug Brown wrote:
    >
    >> I think it is a common fallacy that biodegradable plastic bags actually
    >> degrade in a landfill. It is my understanding that the anerobic nature of
    >> most modern landfills creates conditions where organics simply do not
    >> biodegrade and the result is that the plastic bag, paper plates and
    >> hamburger will still be there 1000's of years from now.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >Perhaps by then someone will figure out how to create fuel from the
    >trash, the ultimate recycling.
    >
    >gloria p


    For some years at least part of the combustible trash from the city of
    Hampton, VA went to a steam generating plant. The plant provided
    steam to NASA Langley and probably to Langley AFB.


    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  18. #18
    ransley Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    On Aug 24, 10:50*pm, squirltop <squirl...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Paul Hovnanian P.E. wrote:
    > > Although I live just outside Seattle, the bag tax issue caught my
    > > attention.

    >
    > > For years, since plastic grocery bags became available, I've used them
    > > (after hauling groceries home in them) as garbage can liners. They work
    > > much better than paper grocery bags (if one must throw out something wet
    > > and sloppy) and most of them are biodegradable (where the plastic trash
    > > bags are not). As a result, I haven't bought plastic trash bags for
    > > years. And that's not just me, but quite a few people I know do the
    > > same.

    >
    > > So, I got thinking: If I had to pay a bag tax, and was eventually
    > > persuaded to bring my own reusable grocery bags, I'd have to start
    > > buying trash bags again. So, I got to wondering: Who stands to gain if
    > > the public shifts from reusing grocery bags to buying trash can liners?

    >
    > > Where do companies like Glad stand on this issue?

    >
    > > --
    > > Paul Hovnanian * * mailto:P...@Hovnanian.com
    > > ------------------------------------------------------------------
    > > When cryptography is outlawed, bayl bhgynjf jvyy unir cevinpl.
    > > * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *-- Etaoin Shrdlu

    >
    > Interesting, we reuse trash bags and don't use them in the garage
    > trash. If something will smell just toss it in a grocery bag and put
    > it in the freezer. Would use reusable canvas bags and all but never
    > really know how much we will get at the store- Hide quoted text -
    >
    > - Show quoted text -


    Good idea, put those dead squirrels, rabbits and dog turds in the
    freezer, maybe some drunk guest will think its a snack and eat it.

  19. #19
    The Daring Dufas Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    Stormin Mormon wrote:
    > I wonder how many otherwise servicable items have been
    > landfilled. Automobiles, shavers, toasters, and maybe the
    > occasional tommy gun from the prohibition era. Some states
    > like Arizona are dry enough that the landfills are still
    > pristine, if some what dessicated.
    >


    The Iraqis buried some jet fighters. *snicker*

    TDD


  20. #20
    Stormin Mormon Guest

    Default Re: Seattle Bag Tax

    I heard on the radio, about a year ago. That some place up
    north in Canada is separating out disposable diapers. (Would
    that be a brown box, at the curb?)

    The cellulose can be broken down by intense heat, and makes
    a servicable low grade liquid fuel for oil fired boilers.

    I'll leave it to others to insert the obligatory potty
    jokes.

    --
    Christopher A. Young
    Learn more about Jesus
    www.lds.org
    ..


    "stan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    Thinking that in future time humans will be mining existing
    garbage
    dumps and 'recovering' the minerals?
    Right now enough wood goes to our local dump to heat not
    only city
    hall but many homes at same time.
    We are very much a throw-away society!



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