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Thread: Re: Pot Roast

  1. #1
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On Thu 01 Mar 2007 05:10:38p, Dimitri told us...

    > Do you have a "stand by" no recipe Pot Roast method?
    >
    > Ax example
    >
    > 1. Salt pepper & flour a large chuck roast in an electric frypan.
    > 2. Brown said chuck roast in hot fat.
    > 3. Add dry onion soup to the top of the roast & a can of Cream of
    > Mushroom Salt (whoops soup).
    > 4. Simmer
    > 5. An hour before serving add quartered potatoes carrots and ???
    >
    > 6. Serve.
    >
    > What's yours?
    >
    > Dimitri


    I've made it exactly that way many times and really enjoy it.

    Another way I make it (also with onion soup mix) is to pulverize the soup
    mix and rub it into the raw meat along with black pepper. I wrap it
    loosely (but seal it tightly) in a double layer of heavy duty foil. Before
    sealing, I slosh some Worcertershire sauce and soy sauce over it and add a
    bay leaf. The wrapped roast is placed in a baking pan and roasted for 7-8
    hours at 225įF. Following that, I let it come to room temperature, then
    chill it until the next day. A lot of liquid will have been produced,
    which can also be thinned down some more with water (you don't need broth).
    Slice the meat cold, lay in a pan and cover with the gravy. Cover the pan
    with foil and heat until just at serving tempeature. This is know back in
    OH as an "Amish" cooked roast.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 05(V)/18(XVIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Trinity Sunday
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 13hrs 45mins
    -------------------------------------------
    I don't make jokes. I just watch the
    government and report the facts.
    --Will Rogers

  2. #2
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.184...
    > On Thu 01 Mar 2007 05:10:38p, Dimitri told us...
    >
    >> Do you have a "stand by" no recipe Pot Roast method?
    >>
    >> Ax example
    >>
    >> 1. Salt pepper & flour a large chuck roast in an electric frypan.
    >> 2. Brown said chuck roast in hot fat.
    >> 3. Add dry onion soup to the top of the roast & a can of Cream of
    >> Mushroom Salt (whoops soup).
    >> 4. Simmer
    >> 5. An hour before serving add quartered potatoes carrots and ???
    >>
    >> 6. Serve.
    >>
    >> What's yours?
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > I've made it exactly that way many times and really enjoy it.
    >
    > Another way I make it (also with onion soup mix) is to pulverize the soup
    > mix and rub it into the raw meat along with black pepper. I wrap it
    > loosely (but seal it tightly) in a double layer of heavy duty foil.
    > Before
    > sealing, I slosh some Worcertershire sauce and soy sauce over it and add a
    > bay leaf. The wrapped roast is placed in a baking pan and roasted for 7-8
    > hours at 225įF. Following that, I let it come to room temperature, then
    > chill it until the next day. A lot of liquid will have been produced,
    > which can also be thinned down some more with water (you don't need
    > broth).
    > Slice the meat cold, lay in a pan and cover with the gravy. Cover the pan
    > with foil and heat until just at serving tempeature. This is know back in
    > OH as an "Amish" cooked roast.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    >


    Ok that onion soup. This time I did not use any. Boy you have a good
    memory.

    Hmmm the slow slow method sounds great. It reminds me of the baby backs I
    do on the smoker @ 250 for 6 hours or so.

    :-)

    Dimitri


  3. #3
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.184...
    > On Thu 01 Mar 2007 05:10:38p, Dimitri told us...
    >
    >> Do you have a "stand by" no recipe Pot Roast method?
    >>
    >> Ax example
    >>
    >> 1. Salt pepper & flour a large chuck roast in an electric frypan.
    >> 2. Brown said chuck roast in hot fat.
    >> 3. Add dry onion soup to the top of the roast & a can of Cream of
    >> Mushroom Salt (whoops soup).
    >> 4. Simmer
    >> 5. An hour before serving add quartered potatoes carrots and ???
    >>
    >> 6. Serve.
    >>
    >> What's yours?
    >>
    >> Dimitri

    >
    > I've made it exactly that way many times and really enjoy it.
    >
    > Another way I make it (also with onion soup mix) is to pulverize the soup
    > mix and rub it into the raw meat along with black pepper. I wrap it
    > loosely (but seal it tightly) in a double layer of heavy duty foil.
    > Before
    > sealing, I slosh some Worcertershire sauce and soy sauce over it and add a
    > bay leaf. The wrapped roast is placed in a baking pan and roasted for 7-8
    > hours at 225įF. Following that, I let it come to room temperature, then
    > chill it until the next day. A lot of liquid will have been produced,
    > which can also be thinned down some more with water (you don't need
    > broth).
    > Slice the meat cold, lay in a pan and cover with the gravy. Cover the pan
    > with foil and heat until just at serving tempeature. This is know back in
    > OH as an "Amish" cooked roast.
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright
    >


    Ok that onion soup. This time I did not use any. Boy you have a good
    memory.

    Hmmm the slow slow method sounds great. It reminds me of the baby backs I
    do on the smoker @ 250 for 6 hours or so.

    :-)

    Dimitri


  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On Sun 18 May 2008 11:20:48a, Dimitri told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 3.184...
    >> On Thu 01 Mar 2007 05:10:38p, Dimitri told us...
    >>
    >>> Do you have a "stand by" no recipe Pot Roast method?
    >>>
    >>> Ax example
    >>>
    >>> 1. Salt pepper & flour a large chuck roast in an electric frypan.
    >>> 2. Brown said chuck roast in hot fat.
    >>> 3. Add dry onion soup to the top of the roast & a can of Cream of
    >>> Mushroom Salt (whoops soup).
    >>> 4. Simmer
    >>> 5. An hour before serving add quartered potatoes carrots and ???
    >>>
    >>> 6. Serve.
    >>>
    >>> What's yours?
    >>>
    >>> Dimitri

    >>
    >> I've made it exactly that way many times and really enjoy it.
    >>
    >> Another way I make it (also with onion soup mix) is to pulverize the

    soup
    >> mix and rub it into the raw meat along with black pepper. I wrap it
    >> loosely (but seal it tightly) in a double layer of heavy duty foil.
    >> Before
    >> sealing, I slosh some Worcertershire sauce and soy sauce over it and add

    a
    >> bay leaf. The wrapped roast is placed in a baking pan and roasted for

    7-8
    >> hours at 225įF. Following that, I let it come to room temperature, then
    >> chill it until the next day. A lot of liquid will have been produced,
    >> which can also be thinned down some more with water (you don't need
    >> broth). Slice the meat cold, lay in a pan and cover with the gravy.

    Cover
    >> the pan with foil and heat until just at serving tempeature. This is

    know
    >> back in OH as an "Amish" cooked roast.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright
    >>

    >
    > Ok that onion soup. This time I did not use any. Boy you have a good
    > memory.
    >
    > Hmmm the slow slow method sounds great. It reminds me of the baby backs

    I
    > do on the smoker @ 250 for 6 hours or so.
    >
    >:-)
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    >


    Do try it sometime, Dimitri I think you'll like it. On the day I serve
    it, I usually parboil small red potatoes, carrots, and boiler onions, then
    toss in melted butter, salt, pepper, and maybe some herbs. I roast these
    till they begin to brown, turning once.

    I love baby backs cooked that way!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 05(V)/18(XVIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Trinity Sunday
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 11hrs 10mins
    -------------------------------------------
    God invented women because sheep can't
    cook.
    -------------------------------------------

  5. #5
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On Sun 18 May 2008 11:20:48a, Dimitri told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <wayneboatwright@ariz[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 3.184...
    >> On Thu 01 Mar 2007 05:10:38p, Dimitri told us...
    >>
    >>> Do you have a "stand by" no recipe Pot Roast method?
    >>>
    >>> Ax example
    >>>
    >>> 1. Salt pepper & flour a large chuck roast in an electric frypan.
    >>> 2. Brown said chuck roast in hot fat.
    >>> 3. Add dry onion soup to the top of the roast & a can of Cream of
    >>> Mushroom Salt (whoops soup).
    >>> 4. Simmer
    >>> 5. An hour before serving add quartered potatoes carrots and ???
    >>>
    >>> 6. Serve.
    >>>
    >>> What's yours?
    >>>
    >>> Dimitri

    >>
    >> I've made it exactly that way many times and really enjoy it.
    >>
    >> Another way I make it (also with onion soup mix) is to pulverize the

    soup
    >> mix and rub it into the raw meat along with black pepper. I wrap it
    >> loosely (but seal it tightly) in a double layer of heavy duty foil.
    >> Before
    >> sealing, I slosh some Worcertershire sauce and soy sauce over it and add

    a
    >> bay leaf. The wrapped roast is placed in a baking pan and roasted for

    7-8
    >> hours at 225įF. Following that, I let it come to room temperature, then
    >> chill it until the next day. A lot of liquid will have been produced,
    >> which can also be thinned down some more with water (you don't need
    >> broth). Slice the meat cold, lay in a pan and cover with the gravy.

    Cover
    >> the pan with foil and heat until just at serving tempeature. This is

    know
    >> back in OH as an "Amish" cooked roast.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright
    >>

    >
    > Ok that onion soup. This time I did not use any. Boy you have a good
    > memory.
    >
    > Hmmm the slow slow method sounds great. It reminds me of the baby backs

    I
    > do on the smoker @ 250 for 6 hours or so.
    >
    >:-)
    >
    > Dimitri
    >
    >


    Do try it sometime, Dimitri I think you'll like it. On the day I serve
    it, I usually parboil small red potatoes, carrots, and boiler onions, then
    toss in melted butter, salt, pepper, and maybe some herbs. I roast these
    till they begin to brown, turning once.

    I love baby backs cooked that way!

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 05(V)/18(XVIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Trinity Sunday
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 11hrs 10mins
    -------------------------------------------
    God invented women because sheep can't
    cook.
    -------------------------------------------

  6. #6
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.184...

    <snip>

    > Do try it sometime, Dimitri I think you'll like it. On the day I serve
    > it, I usually parboil small red potatoes, carrots, and boiler onions, then
    > toss in melted butter, salt, pepper, and maybe some herbs. I roast these
    > till they begin to brown, turning once.
    >
    > I love baby backs cooked that way!
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright


    Since moving to the central coast I have been "experimenting" with the local
    red oak. It really emparts a wonderful and very different flavor. All over
    the area they cook over a live red oak fire.

    Go here
    http://www.santamaria.com/visit/sect.../barbecue.html
    and click on the video.

    "In the early 1960s Santa Marianís noticed how much meat was being wasted
    using the rib steaks, and felt that something should be done to lower food
    costs. So they started experimenting with other cuts which would not be so
    costly. As a result Top Block Sirloin was discovered.

    In the mid-1960s, Santa Marianís discovered the incredible taste of Tri-tip.

    Before the mid 1960s, Tri-tip was practically considered scrap, not good for
    anything other than stew meat or hamburger.
    Tri-tip is a very good cut of meat; however, usually by the time you have
    trimmed the excess fat, you will find it is more expensive than the Top
    sirloin. "

    Dimitri


  7. #7
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast


    "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] 3.184...

    <snip>

    > Do try it sometime, Dimitri I think you'll like it. On the day I serve
    > it, I usually parboil small red potatoes, carrots, and boiler onions, then
    > toss in melted butter, salt, pepper, and maybe some herbs. I roast these
    > till they begin to brown, turning once.
    >
    > I love baby backs cooked that way!
    >
    > --
    > Wayne Boatwright


    Since moving to the central coast I have been "experimenting" with the local
    red oak. It really emparts a wonderful and very different flavor. All over
    the area they cook over a live red oak fire.

    Go here
    http://www.santamaria.com/visit/sect.../barbecue.html
    and click on the video.

    "In the early 1960s Santa Marianís noticed how much meat was being wasted
    using the rib steaks, and felt that something should be done to lower food
    costs. So they started experimenting with other cuts which would not be so
    costly. As a result Top Block Sirloin was discovered.

    In the mid-1960s, Santa Marianís discovered the incredible taste of Tri-tip.

    Before the mid 1960s, Tri-tip was practically considered scrap, not good for
    anything other than stew meat or hamburger.
    Tri-tip is a very good cut of meat; however, usually by the time you have
    trimmed the excess fat, you will find it is more expensive than the Top
    sirloin. "

    Dimitri


  8. #8
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On May 18, 1:35*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:

    > "In the early 1960s Santa Marianís noticed how much meat was being wasted
    > using the rib steaks, and felt that something should be done to lower food
    > costs. So they started experimenting with other cuts which would not be so
    > costly. As a result Top Block Sirloin was discovered.


    Ah, the memories! I remember when my grandparents were living in Santa
    Maria in the sixties. Grandma passed on her recipe for "Santa Maria
    Steak" using a cheaper cut that became quite tender with the
    marinating all day in soy or teriyaki sauce before hitting the grill.

    It was an old grilling stand-by of mine for years and I kept the name
    alive. Seems to me that the cheaper cuts back then were more tender
    and flavorful than the regular or choice cuts we get these days. Am I
    the only one that remembers meat like that?

    --Lin

  9. #9
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On May 18, 1:35*pm, "Dimitri" <Dimitr...@prodigy.net> wrote:

    > "In the early 1960s Santa Marianís noticed how much meat was being wasted
    > using the rib steaks, and felt that something should be done to lower food
    > costs. So they started experimenting with other cuts which would not be so
    > costly. As a result Top Block Sirloin was discovered.


    Ah, the memories! I remember when my grandparents were living in Santa
    Maria in the sixties. Grandma passed on her recipe for "Santa Maria
    Steak" using a cheaper cut that became quite tender with the
    marinating all day in soy or teriyaki sauce before hitting the grill.

    It was an old grilling stand-by of mine for years and I kept the name
    alive. Seems to me that the cheaper cuts back then were more tender
    and flavorful than the regular or choice cuts we get these days. Am I
    the only one that remembers meat like that?

    --Lin

  10. #10
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On Sun 18 May 2008 01:35:19p, Dimitri told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 3.184...
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Do try it sometime, Dimitri I think you'll like it. On the day I
    >> serve it, I usually parboil small red potatoes, carrots, and boiler
    >> onions, then toss in melted butter, salt, pepper, and maybe some herbs.
    >> I roast these till they begin to brown, turning once.
    >>
    >> I love baby backs cooked that way!
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright

    >
    > Since moving to the central coast I have been "experimenting" with the
    > local red oak. It really emparts a wonderful and very different flavor.
    > All over the area they cook over a live red oak fire.


    My dad always grilled over a live oak fire, although not red oak. I always
    loved the flavor.

    > Go here
    > http://www.santamaria.com/visit/sect.../barbecue.html
    > and click on the video.


    Very nice!

    > "In the early 1960s Santa Marianís noticed how much meat was being
    > wasted using the rib steaks, and felt that something should be done to
    > lower food costs. So they started experimenting with other cuts which
    > would not be so costly. As a result Top Block Sirloin was discovered.
    >
    > In the mid-1960s, Santa Marianís discovered the incredible taste of
    > Tri-tip.
    >
    > Before the mid 1960s, Tri-tip was practically considered scrap, not good
    > for anything other than stew meat or hamburger.
    > Tri-tip is a very good cut of meat; however, usually by the time you
    > have trimmed the excess fat, you will find it is more expensive than the
    > Top sirloin. "
    >
    > Dimitri


    I don't have a smoker, so I quasi-smoke on a gas grill with indirect heat
    and a large packet of wet wood chips that get replenished throughout most
    of the cooking time.

    I love tri-tip roasts, but have never done one one the grill, just in the
    oven. They are common to find in the stores here in AZ.

    My favorite steak is still a rib steak, though, and always with the bone.
    We often get some good buys on them at a local store here.




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 05(V)/18(XVIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Trinity Sunday
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 9hrs 30mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Suicidal twin kills sister by mistake!
    -------------------------------------------


  11. #11
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    On Sun 18 May 2008 01:35:19p, Dimitri told us...

    >
    > "Wayne Boatwright" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected] 3.184...
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >> Do try it sometime, Dimitri I think you'll like it. On the day I
    >> serve it, I usually parboil small red potatoes, carrots, and boiler
    >> onions, then toss in melted butter, salt, pepper, and maybe some herbs.
    >> I roast these till they begin to brown, turning once.
    >>
    >> I love baby backs cooked that way!
    >>
    >> --
    >> Wayne Boatwright

    >
    > Since moving to the central coast I have been "experimenting" with the
    > local red oak. It really emparts a wonderful and very different flavor.
    > All over the area they cook over a live red oak fire.


    My dad always grilled over a live oak fire, although not red oak. I always
    loved the flavor.

    > Go here
    > http://www.santamaria.com/visit/sect.../barbecue.html
    > and click on the video.


    Very nice!

    > "In the early 1960s Santa Marianís noticed how much meat was being
    > wasted using the rib steaks, and felt that something should be done to
    > lower food costs. So they started experimenting with other cuts which
    > would not be so costly. As a result Top Block Sirloin was discovered.
    >
    > In the mid-1960s, Santa Marianís discovered the incredible taste of
    > Tri-tip.
    >
    > Before the mid 1960s, Tri-tip was practically considered scrap, not good
    > for anything other than stew meat or hamburger.
    > Tri-tip is a very good cut of meat; however, usually by the time you
    > have trimmed the excess fat, you will find it is more expensive than the
    > Top sirloin. "
    >
    > Dimitri


    I don't have a smoker, so I quasi-smoke on a gas grill with indirect heat
    and a large packet of wet wood chips that get replenished throughout most
    of the cooking time.

    I love tri-tip roasts, but have never done one one the grill, just in the
    oven. They are common to find in the stores here in AZ.

    My favorite steak is still a rib steak, though, and always with the bone.
    We often get some good buys on them at a local store here.




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    -------------------------------------------
    Sunday, 05(V)/18(XVIII)/08(MMVIII)
    -------------------------------------------
    Today is: Trinity Sunday
    Countdown till Memorial Day
    1wks 9hrs 30mins
    -------------------------------------------
    Suicidal twin kills sister by mistake!
    -------------------------------------------


  12. #12
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:Vs0Yj.2871$[email protected]:

    > Since moving to the central coast I have been "experimenting" with the
    > local red oak. It really emparts a wonderful and very different
    > flavor. All over the area they cook over a live red oak fire.
    >


    Oak has always been my favorite smoke wood.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan

    A man in line at the bank kept falling over...when he got to a teller he
    asked for his balance.


  13. #13
    hahabogus Guest

    Default Re: Pot Roast

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:Vs0Yj.2871$[email protected]:

    > Since moving to the central coast I have been "experimenting" with the
    > local red oak. It really emparts a wonderful and very different
    > flavor. All over the area they cook over a live red oak fire.
    >


    Oak has always been my favorite smoke wood.

    --

    The house of the burning beet-Alan

    A man in line at the bank kept falling over...when he got to a teller he
    asked for his balance.


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