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Thread: Re: The Perfect Fried Gizzard

  1. #1
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: The Perfect Fried Gizzard


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I must have missed this episode on Americas Test Kitchen. What I
    > don't want is tough, rubbery, inedible gizzards. Which is how they
    > seem to be served everywhere I've tried. I want tender and edible.
    >
    > I will not mention my projected method so as not to skew your
    > suggestions. But I do have a simple plan. And I already have the
    > gizzards.
    >
    > -sw


    There was a segment on D D & D that featured a place that specialized in
    deep fried gizzards. The gizzards were pressure cooked before being
    battered and deep fried.

    Dimitri


  2. #2
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: The Perfect Fried Gizzard

    On Fri, 7 Oct 2011 11:03:31 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 7 Oct 2011 07:51:55 -0700, Dimitri wrote:
    >
    >> There was a segment on D D & D that featured a place that specialized in
    >> deep fried gizzards. The gizzards were pressure cooked before being
    >> battered and deep fried.

    >
    >Two votes for pressure cook (Dimitri and Janet). Don't knowe what DDD
    >is, but I'll assume, FoodTV.
    >
    >I don't have a pressure cooker anymore, so I planned on baking them. I
    >don't want to boil out any of the flavor. But to save energy I might
    >simmer them in chicken broth until almost dry to try and preserve some
    >flavor.
    >
    >I'd never heard of anyone pressure cooking them first, but it's sure
    >seems obvious they need pre-cooked somehow.
    >
    >-sw

    Long, slow cooking in water is how it was done to produce something
    for giblet gravy. A slow cooker would work. (DDD=Diners, Drive ins
    and Dives) You might check Food Network for show recipes. They
    sometimes carry the recipes of some of the places they visit.
    Janet US

  3. #3
    Pico Rico Guest

    Default Re: The Perfect Fried Gizzard


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:tmd5377sb1hu$.[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 7 Oct 2011 11:03:31 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> Two votes for pressure cook (Dimitri and Janet). Don't knowe what DDD
    >> is, but I'll assume, FoodTV.
    >>
    >> I don't have a pressure cooker anymore, so I planned on baking them. I
    >> don't want to boil out any of the flavor. But to save energy I might
    >> simmer them in chicken broth until almost dry to try and preserve some
    >> flavor.

    >
    > Well, I got the simmering until tender part down. Having the oven on
    > for 2 hours didn't make sense.
    >
    > But for some reason my breading didn't take. I seasoned the wet
    > gizzards and threw them into a bag of flour, then let them site for a
    > half an hour shaking every 10 minutes or so. Then I shook them off
    > and let dry a little more, but nothing took. And nothing came off in
    > the oil, really, either. I should have went for a batter instead. I
    > guess the smooth slippery texture of gizzards just isn't conducive to
    > this type of breading.
    >
    > http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/899...dsandfries.jpg
    >
    > They were still pretty good, if not photogenic. I might do it again
    > (with a batter).
    >



    I'd say that is a fine amount of breading. You really don't need them to be
    completely encased.



  4. #4
    George Leppla Guest

    Default Re: The Perfect Fried Gizzard

    On 10/7/2011 8:59 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    > But for some reason my breading didn't take. I seasoned the wet
    > gizzards and threw them into a bag of flour, then let them site for a
    > half an hour shaking every 10 minutes or so. Then I shook them off
    > and let dry a little more, but nothing took. And nothing came off in
    > the oil, really, either. I should have went for a batter instead. I
    > guess the smooth slippery texture of gizzards just isn't conducive to
    > this type of breading.
    >
    > http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/899...dsandfries.jpg
    >
    > They were still pretty good, if not photogenic. I might do it again
    > (with a batter).


    I don't know... they look pretty good to me.

    George L

  5. #5
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: The Perfect Fried Gizzard

    On Fri, 7 Oct 2011 20:59:09 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Fri, 7 Oct 2011 11:03:31 -0500, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    >> Two votes for pressure cook (Dimitri and Janet). Don't knowe what DDD
    >> is, but I'll assume, FoodTV.
    >>
    >> I don't have a pressure cooker anymore, so I planned on baking them. I
    >> don't want to boil out any of the flavor. But to save energy I might
    >> simmer them in chicken broth until almost dry to try and preserve some
    >> flavor.

    >
    >Well, I got the simmering until tender part down. Having the oven on
    >for 2 hours didn't make sense.
    >
    >But for some reason my breading didn't take. I seasoned the wet
    >gizzards and threw them into a bag of flour, then let them site for a
    >half an hour shaking every 10 minutes or so. Then I shook them off
    >and let dry a little more, but nothing took. And nothing came off in
    >the oil, really, either. I should have went for a batter instead. I
    >guess the smooth slippery texture of gizzards just isn't conducive to
    >this type of breading.
    >
    >http://img40.imageshack.us/img40/899...dsandfries.jpg
    >
    >They were still pretty good, if not photogenic. I might do it again
    >(with a batter).
    >
    >-sw


    Try drying the meat before you flour it. Even though the meat is
    "dry", seasoning and flour will adhere much better and won't wash off
    or get gummy.
    Janet US

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