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Thread: Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

  1. #1
    The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    "Bobs yer uncle" <[email protected]> wrote

    >A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that was
    > a classic. All I remember was that it involved using a cherry Kool
    > Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.


    Liquid smoke was also used.

    > Can't
    > find it on Google--anyone remember?


    I vaguely remember that. A couple of people tried it and said
    it was actually pretty good.

    --Tedward



  2. #2
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy wrote:

    A tired attempt at a cross-posted troll.

    Cross-posting kept intact for credit as a chain-letter.
    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  3. #3
    Mercellus Bohren Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    On Nov 18, 4:29*pm, "Dave Bugg" <davebu...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy wrote:
    >
    > A tired attempt at a cross-posted troll.
    >
    > Cross-posting kept intact for credit as a chain-letter.
    > --
    > Dave
    > What is best in life? * *"To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    > you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan


    oooo...credit! How's that work?

  4. #4
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    On Nov 18, 3:50*pm, "The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy" <e...@eio.com>
    wrote:
    > "Bobs yer uncle" <mcgrisw...@aol.com> wrote
    >
    > >A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that was
    > > a classic. *All I remember was that it involved using a cherry Kool
    > > Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.

    >
    > Liquid smoke was also used.
    >
    > > Can't
    > > find it on Google--anyone remember?

    >
    > I vaguely remember that. *A couple of people tried it and said
    > it was actually pretty good.
    >
    > --Tedward


    None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.
    That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke. Nothing is
    added, it's just concentrated. Doesn't replace the beautiful char on
    BBQ and the crusty edges, but you can do it inside in the winter
    without a $1500 grill top range.
    Lynn in Fargo
    whose Mom used it in the olden days (1950s)

  5. #5
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 3:50 pm, "The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy" <e...@eio.com>
    > wrote:
    >> "Bobs yer uncle" <mcgrisw...@aol.com> wrote
    >>
    >>> A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that
    >>> was a classic. All I remember was that it involved using a cherry
    >>> Kool Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.

    >>
    >> Liquid smoke was also used.
    >>
    >>> Can't
    >>> find it on Google--anyone remember?

    >>
    >> I vaguely remember that. A couple of people tried it and said
    >> it was actually pretty good.
    >>
    >> --Tedward

    >
    > None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    > America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.


    Which is just further confirmation of why I regard their comments, reviews,
    and recommendations with a bit of a grain of salt.

    > That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    > until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke.


    No, it is the by-product of smoke, commonly referred to as creosote.

    > Nothing is
    > added, it's just concentrated. Doesn't replace the beautiful char on
    > BBQ and the crusty edges, but you can do it inside in the winter
    > without a $1500 grill top range.


    Grilling ain't bbq.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  6. #6
    --Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    On Nov 18, 4:39*pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 3:50*pm, "The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy" <e...@eio.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > "Bobs yer uncle" <mcgrisw...@aol.com> wrote

    >
    > > >A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that was
    > > > a classic. *All I remember was that it involved using a cherry Kool
    > > > Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.

    >
    > > Liquid smoke was also used.

    >
    > > > Can't
    > > > find it on Google--anyone remember?

    >
    > > I vaguely remember that. *A couple of people tried it and said
    > > it was actually pretty good.

    >
    > > --Tedward

    >
    > None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    > America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.
    > That's what it is. *Smoke is a vapor and it that *water is cooled
    > until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke. *Nothing is
    > added, it's just concentrated. *Doesn't replace the beautiful char on
    > BBQ and the crusty edges, but you can do it inside in the winter
    > without a $1500 grill top range.


    Liquid Smoke brand (Colgin's) has vinegar in it. As someone who cooks
    over wood on a regular basis, I think that the stuff is best left on
    the grocer's shelf. I guess it does go well with Kool-Aid though.

    > Lynn in Fargo
    > whose Mom used it in the olden days (1950s)


    My mom made some nasty things too.

    --Bryan


  7. #7
    The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    "Dave Bugg" <[email protected]> wrote

    >>>> A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that
    >>>> was a classic. All I remember was that it involved using a cherry
    >>>> Kool Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.
    >>>
    >>> Liquid smoke was also used.
    >>>
    >>>> Can't
    >>>> find it on Google--anyone remember?
    >>>
    >>> I vaguely remember that. A couple of people tried it and said
    >>> it was actually pretty good.
    >>>
    >>> --Tedward

    >>
    >> None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    >> America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.


    Who's the troll NOW, bucko?

    > Which is just further confirmation of why I regard their comments,
    > reviews, and recommendations with a bit of a grain of salt.
    >
    >> That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    >> until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke.

    >
    > No, it is the by-product of smoke, commonly referred to as creosote.


    Yeah, right.

    Troll: One who posts false information hoping to get "helpful"
    corrections. (It's either that, or you should check your
    nonsense before posting to the usenet. I always do.)

    --Tedward



  8. #8
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Dave Bugg said:
    > Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    clips
    >> That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    >> until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke.

    >
    > No, it is the by-product of smoke, commonly referred to as creosote.
    >
    >> Nothing is
    >> added, it's just concentrated. Doesn't replace the beautiful char on
    >> BBQ and the crusty edges, but you can do it inside in the winter
    >> without a $1500 grill top range.

    >
    > Grilling ain't bbq.


    (stupid crossposting deleted)

    But grilling is acceptable content in this group. At least last time I
    checked.

    Liquid smoke is creosote? OK, then please cite proof.

    I'm not a fan of the stuff, but there was a recent food network program
    where they showed weird food science stuff and debunked myths, hosted by Ted
    Allen, although I don't recall the name of the program, it seems to be off
    the air now. They did a test where they took two groups of NYC firemen and
    fed them both barbecue spareribs, one prepared traditionally over a wood
    fire in smoke, and one prepared in an oven using liquid smoke. Then they
    blind tested them to see which they thought was authentic. The majority of
    them picked the liquid smoke product as authentic.

    MartyB in KC


  9. #9
    CaveMan Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?


    "Nunya Bidnits" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:he20e3$1dh$[email protected]..

    > (stupid crossposting deleted)


    No you didn't.
    >
    >
    > MartyB in KC
    >




  10. #10
    Nonny Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    I won't take sides on the Liquid Smoke debate, but we don't use it
    here since I have the means to do real smoking.

    In the piece mentioned about the test of liquid smoke vs. real
    smoking, I think its reasonable to factor in the time limits,
    facilities limit and cost limit imposed on so many folk. Not
    everyone lives on 6 acres, has a window opening onto a fire
    escape, has a balcony/patio or can afford the time to do it
    "right."

    Even Alton Brown made some liquid smoke on his show once, using a
    clay "chiminea(sp?)" and inverting a cold lid to condense the
    moisture and cause it to drip into a receptacle. In that case, I
    saw little difference in that version of smoke and what would
    condense on a cold piece of meat during a cold smoking in my own
    Bradley.

    --
    Nonny

    What does it mean when drool runs
    out of both sides of a drunken
    Congressman's mouth?

    The floor is level.




  11. #11
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Dave Bugg said:
    >> Lynn from Fargo wrote:

    > clips
    >>> That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    >>> until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke.

    >>
    >> No, it is the by-product of smoke, commonly referred to as creosote.
    >>
    >>> Nothing is
    >>> added, it's just concentrated. Doesn't replace the beautiful char
    >>> on BBQ and the crusty edges, but you can do it inside in the winter
    >>> without a $1500 grill top range.

    >>
    >> Grilling ain't bbq.

    >
    > (stupid crossposting deleted)
    >
    > But grilling is acceptable content in this group. At least last time I
    > checked.


    I never said it wasn't. Read the content again. I was referring to the use
    of bbq in the context of grilling. Now please show me where I stated that
    the post shouldn't have been made.

    > Liquid smoke is creosote? OK, then please cite proof.


    Easy. Take some scrapings of hardened creosote from a chimney. Put the
    scapings into a water. Soak overnight. Taste. Voila... liquid smoke.

    > I'm not a fan of the stuff, ...


    Neither am I, but I've used it in some recipes. That doesn't change the fact
    that LS is creosote in solution.

    > ....but there was a recent food network
    > program where they showed weird food science stuff and debunked
    > myths, hosted by Ted Allen, although I don't recall the name of the
    > program, it seems to be off the air now. They did a test where they
    > took two groups of NYC firemen and fed them both barbecue spareribs,
    > one prepared traditionally over a wood fire in smoke, and one
    > prepared in an oven using liquid smoke. Then they blind tested them
    > to see which they thought was authentic. The majority of them picked
    > the liquid smoke product as authentic.


    So? A good many folks think the McRib is the height of bbq ecstasy. But if
    you think the oven/LS comparison is an equivalent to real bbq, believe me, I
    won't try to dissuade you from that opinion. If you don't think that it is
    equivalent, then why did you bring it up?

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  12. #12
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Liquid smoke is creosote? OK, then please cite proof.


    Proof? You can't tell me you don't know how the carbon deposits in
    chimneys -- which we call creosote -- is formed? Just in case:

    From
    http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php..._and_solutions


    "The gases leave the burning wood with the smoke. If the smoke is cooled
    below 250 degrees F, the gases liquefy, combine, and solidify, forming
    creosote. Creosote takes several forms, all bad. As a liquid, it can run
    down the insides of pipes and chimneys, oozing out of any openings. It can
    form a hard layer coating the insides of pipes and chimney liners. It can
    form into a fluffy substance that plugs pipes and breaks off and falls down,
    filling low spots in piping. It is the cause of most chimney fires and the
    main reason chimneys and pipes have to be cleaned and inspected
    periodically."

    Liquid smoke is a dilutent of creosote kept in solution.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



  13. #13
    cybercat Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?


    "The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:he209c$dbd$[email protected]..
    > "Dave Bugg" <[email protected]> wrote
    >
    >>>>> A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that
    >>>>> was a classic. All I remember was that it involved using a cherry
    >>>>> Kool Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.
    >>>>
    >>>> Liquid smoke was also used.
    >>>>
    >>>>> Can't
    >>>>> find it on Google--anyone remember?
    >>>>
    >>>> I vaguely remember that. A couple of people tried it and said
    >>>> it was actually pretty good.
    >>>>
    >>>> --Tedward
    >>>
    >>> None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    >>> America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.

    >
    > Who's the troll NOW, bucko?
    >
    >> Which is just further confirmation of why I regard their comments,
    >> reviews, and recommendations with a bit of a grain of salt.
    >>
    >>> That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    >>> until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke.

    >>
    >> No, it is the by-product of smoke, commonly referred to as creosote.

    >
    > Yeah, right.
    >
    > Troll: One who posts false information hoping to get "helpful"
    > corrections. (It's either that, or you should check your
    > nonsense before posting to the usenet. I always do.)
    >


    Another ****ing bbq freak speaks.



  14. #14
    Piet de Arcilla Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    On Nov 18, 5:39*pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    > On Nov 18, 3:50*pm, "The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy" <e...@eio.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > "Bobs yer uncle" <mcgrisw...@aol.com> wrote

    >
    > > >A few years back, someone posted a recipe for microwaved ribs that was
    > > > a classic. *All I remember was that it involved using a cherry Kool
    > > > Aid rub to overcome the inevitably gray color the ribs took on.

    >
    > > Liquid smoke was also used.

    >
    > > > Can't
    > > > find it on Google--anyone remember?

    >
    > > I vaguely remember that. *A couple of people tried it and said
    > > it was actually pretty good.

    >
    > > --Tedward

    >
    > None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    > America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.
    > That's what it is. *Smoke is a vapor and it that *water is cooled
    > until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke. *Nothing is
    > added, it's just concentrated.


    Concentrated carcinogens, I'll warrant.

  15. #15
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Dave Bugg wrote:
    > Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> Liquid smoke is creosote? OK, then please cite proof.

    >
    > Proof? You can't tell me you don't know how the carbon deposits in
    > chimneys -- which we call creosote -- is formed? Just in case:
    >
    > From
    > http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php..._and_solutions
    >
    >
    > "The gases leave the burning wood with the smoke. If the smoke is cooled
    > below 250 degrees F, the gases liquefy, combine, and solidify, forming
    > creosote. Creosote takes several forms, all bad. As a liquid, it can run
    > down the insides of pipes and chimneys, oozing out of any openings. It can
    > form a hard layer coating the insides of pipes and chimney liners. It can
    > form into a fluffy substance that plugs pipes and breaks off and falls down,
    > filling low spots in piping. It is the cause of most chimney fires and the
    > main reason chimneys and pipes have to be cleaned and inspected
    > periodically."
    >
    > Liquid smoke is a dilutent of creosote kept in solution.
    >


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liquid_smoke

  16. #16
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Dave Bugg wrote:

    > Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >> Liquid smoke is creosote? OK, then please cite proof.

    >
    > "The gases leave the burning wood with the smoke. If the smoke is cooled
    > below 250 degrees F, the gases liquefy, combine, and solidify, forming
    > creosote. Creosote takes several forms, all bad. As a liquid, it can run
    > down the insides of pipes and chimneys, oozing out of any openings. It can
    > form a hard layer coating the insides of pipes and chimney liners. It can
    > form into a fluffy substance that plugs pipes and breaks off and falls down,
    > filling low spots in piping. It is the cause of most chimney fires and the
    > main reason chimneys and pipes have to be cleaned and inspected
    > periodically."


    > Liquid smoke is a dilutent of creosote kept in solution.


    The missing info here is that "creosote" is an informal term
    for solidified wood smoke. It is not the same thing as industrial
    creosote, nor does it have anything to do with creosote bushes
    and their chemicals.

    Liquid smoke has the same chemical components found in normal smoked
    foods, nothing more.

    Steve

  17. #17
    The Ghost of Edward M. Kennedy Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    "Piet de Arcilla" <[email protected]> wrote

    > None the less authority than whatzisface at Cook's Illustrated of
    > America's Test Kitchen fame has given a go ahead nod to Liquid Smoke.
    > That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    > until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke. Nothing is
    > added, it's just concentrated.

    <
    <Concentrated carcinogens, I'll warrant.

    Actually they go out of their to remove most of them,
    and it is actually safer than grilling. You and that
    troll Dave Bugg might to Google how it's made.

    It ain't creosote.

    --Tedward



  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Mercellus Bohren said:

    >
    > oooo...credit! How's that work?


    Observe...

    You are credited with being a pest.

    <plonk>

  19. #19
    David Harmon Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    On Wed, 18 Nov 2009 15:06:59 -0800 in rec.food.cooking, "Dave Bugg"
    <[email protected]> wrote,
    >Lynn from Fargo wrote:
    >> That's what it is. Smoke is a vapor and it that water is cooled
    >> until it condenses and the remaining liquid is smoke.

    >
    >No, it is the by-product of smoke, commonly referred to as creosote.


    It is still the same stuff that gets absorbed from smoke by the meat,
    isn't it? If not, what chemically is the difference?




  20. #20
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Microwave BBQ recipe?

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    > Dave Bugg crossposted:


    As intended. Crossposting re-added.

    >> Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >>> Liquid smoke is creosote? OK, then please cite proof.

    >>
    >> Proof? You can't tell me you don't know how the carbon deposits in
    >> chimneys -- which we call creosote -- is formed? Just in case:
    >>
    >> From
    >>

    > http://hearth.com/econtent/index.php..._and_solutions
    >>
    >>
    >> "The gases leave the burning wood with the smoke. If the smoke is
    >> cooled below 250 degrees F, the gases liquefy, combine, and solidify,
    >> forming creosote. Creosote takes several forms, all bad. As a liquid,
    >> it can run down the insides of pipes and chimneys, oozing out of any
    >> openings. It can form a hard layer coating the insides of pipes and
    >> chimney liners. It can form into a fluffy substance that plugs pipes
    >> and breaks off and falls down, filling low spots in piping. It is the
    >> cause of most chimney fires and the main reason chimneys and pipes
    >> have to be cleaned and inspected periodically."
    >>
    >> Liquid smoke is a dilutent of creosote kept in solution.

    >
    > Well I didn't ask for a cite on how creosote is made, I asked for one
    > that shows liquid smoke as sold as a seasoning is creosote.


    The same process that creates creosote is the same process that creates
    liquid smoke. Wood smoke that is introduced to a cooled surface to create a
    precipitate of the particulates.

    > In other words, I'd like to see a cite of the last sentence you wrote in
    > your
    > post. It just doesn't sound quite right. The information you posted
    > only describes creosote, not liquid smoke. I'm not saying you're
    > wrong, I'm asking for a cite. There's a difference.


    I have no cite as I have not looked for one; the process of creating LS is
    identical to the process of creating creosote. I'm sure a lot of folks have
    observed the same. But let me ask: Aside from allowing the precipitate to
    harden, what is the difference between how creosote is formed and how LS is
    made? If there is a difference, I'm not aware of it.

    --
    Dave
    What is best in life? "To crush your enemies, see them driven before
    you, and to hear the lamentation of the women." -- Conan



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