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Thread: Re: Lamb Meatball Update

  1. #1
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Last month Dimitri suggested using Greek oregano in lamb meatballs.
    Following up on this, I tried my usual preparation (which includes
    garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and salt) but this time left out the
    smoked paprika, and included some European marjoram and Mexican oregano,
    along with a little cayenne.

    Result: very good! Thanks Dimitri.

    I'll have to get hold of some actual Greek oregano sometime and try
    it with that.


    Steve

  2. #2
    M. JL Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Steve Pope wrote:

    > Last month Dimitri suggested using Greek oregano in lamb meatballs.
    > Following up on this, I tried my usual preparation (which includes
    > garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and salt) but this time left out the
    > smoked paprika, and included some European marjoram and Mexican oregano,
    > along with a little cayenne.
    >
    > Result: very good! Thanks Dimitri.
    >
    > I'll have to get hold of some actual Greek oregano sometime and try
    > it with that.
    >
    >
    > Steve


    Kofta with tzatziki sauce

    http://allrecipes.com//Recipe/kofta-kebabs/Detail.aspx

    A local place makes a very good beef/lamb mix.
    --
    JL

  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 01:17:19 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > Last month Dimitri suggested using Greek oregano in lamb meatballs.
    > Following up on this, I tried my usual preparation (which includes
    > garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and salt) but this time left out the
    > smoked paprika, and included some European marjoram and Mexican oregano,
    > along with a little cayenne.
    >
    > Result: very good! Thanks Dimitri.
    >
    > I'll have to get hold of some actual Greek oregano sometime and try
    > it with that.


    A couple of us told you to dump the paprika. I didn't notice that you
    didn't have oregano or I would have suggested that, too :-)

    I love smoked paprika, but it can be overpowering and out of place in
    certain foods. I think it goes best with shrimp and scallops. It can
    also make a mean mayo for sandwiches and potato salads.

    -sw

  4. #4
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 01:17:19 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:


    >> Last month Dimitri suggested using Greek oregano in lamb meatballs.
    >> Following up on this, I tried my usual preparation (which includes
    >> garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and salt) but this time left out the
    >> smoked paprika, and included some European marjoram and Mexican oregano,
    >> along with a little cayenne.


    >> Result: very good! Thanks Dimitri.


    >> I'll have to get hold of some actual Greek oregano sometime and try
    >> it with that.


    >A couple of us told you to dump the paprika.


    Well, I happen to like the resutls with smoked paprika, despit what
    a couple of ya have said.

    >I love smoked paprika, but it can be overpowering and out of place in
    >certain foods. I think it goes best with shrimp and scallops. It can
    >also make a mean mayo for sandwiches and potato salads.


    I agree it can be overpowering, but I think more than overpowering
    in a single dish it, can become distracting if used in too many things
    in too short of a length of time. I would not want to use it every
    day, and even once a week the stuff starts to become too familiar.

    I have not tried it on shrimp/scallops. My most recent scallop
    preparation involved broiling, and adding olive oil and garlic
    for the last minute or so under the broiler. That worked out.

    Steve

  5. #5
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 05:34:06 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > I agree it can be overpowering, but I think more than overpowering
    > in a single dish it, can become distracting if used in too many things
    > in too short of a length of time. I would not want to use it every
    > day, and even once a week the stuff starts to become too familiar.
    >
    > I have not tried it on shrimp/scallops. My most recent scallop
    > preparation involved broiling, and adding olive oil and garlic
    > for the last minute or so under the broiler. That worked out.


    I just has a fresh choriso reuben for breakfast. I make the sausage
    according to this recipe and use it fresh (and freeze the other 3
    pounds). This the single most bestest use for smoked paprika:

    http://lpoli.50webs.com/index_files/...Portuguese.pdf

    I just made another 5lb batch of it last week.

    -sw

  6. #6
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On 3/19/2011 11:18 PM, Sqwertz wrote:

    > I love smoked paprika, but it can be overpowering and out of place in
    > certain foods. I think it goes best with shrimp and scallops. It can
    > also make a mean mayo for sandwiches and potato salads.


    sprinkle smoked paprika instead of Spanish paprika on deviled eggs. Good.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 14:28:58 -0500, Janet Wilder
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 3/19/2011 11:18 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > > I love smoked paprika, but it can be overpowering and out of place in
    > > certain foods. I think it goes best with shrimp and scallops. It can
    > > also make a mean mayo for sandwiches and potato salads.

    >
    > sprinkle smoked paprika instead of Spanish paprika on deviled eggs. Good.


    Mine is smoked Spanish paprika.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  8. #8
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Mar 19, 8:17*pm, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > Last month Dimitri suggested using Greek oregano in lamb meatballs.
    > Following up on this, I tried my usual preparation (which includes
    > garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and salt) but this time left out the
    > smoked paprika, and included some European marjoram and Mexican oregano,
    > along with a little cayenne.
    >
    > Result: very good! *Thanks Dimitri.
    >
    > I'll have to get hold of some actual Greek oregano sometime and try
    > it with that.


    I wouldn't have included the marjoram, but oregano, garlic, olive oil,
    black pepper, and salt is what I use to season lamb, meatballs or
    otherwise.
    >
    > Steve


    --Bryan

  9. #9
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    In article <4d865577$0$32737$c3e8da3$[email protected] om>,
    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 3/19/2011 11:18 PM, Sqwertz wrote:
    >
    > > I love smoked paprika, but it can be overpowering and out of place in
    > > certain foods. I think it goes best with shrimp and scallops. It can
    > > also make a mean mayo for sandwiches and potato salads.

    >
    > sprinkle smoked paprika instead of Spanish paprika on deviled eggs. Good.


    Better: cayenne! My kids and I like that. The kids like ground
    chipotle also.

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  10. #10
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I wouldn't have included the marjoram, but oregano, garlic, olive oil,
    >black pepper, and salt is what I use to season lamb, meatballs or
    >otherwise.


    Isn't marjoram just a sub-variety of oregano?

    Steve

  11. #11
    Lyndon Watson Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Mar 21, 10:58*am, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > Bryan *<bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >I wouldn't have included the marjoram, but oregano, garlic, olive oil,
    > >black pepper, and salt is what I use to season lamb, meatballs or
    > >otherwise.

    >
    > Isn't marjoram just a sub-variety of oregano?


    No, "marjoram" is the old English name for any herb of the genus
    Origanum. Origanum vulgare is wild marjoran, O. marjorana is sweet
    marjoram, O. onites is either winter marjoram or pot marjoram, I can't
    remember which, and so on.

    "Oregano" is the name of a flavour rather than a species of herb. It
    includes O. Heracleoticum (sp?) and O. prismaticum as well as other
    herbs not of the Origanum genus. In this country you can buy an
    oregano mixture of seeds for the full range.

    Some unscrupulous merchants are selling wild marjoram, O. vulgare, as
    oregano. Anyone who knows the flavour of real oregano would be sorely
    disappointed.

    LW

  12. #12
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Lyndon Watson <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Mar 21, 10:58*am, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:


    >> Isn't marjoram just a sub-variety of oregano?


    >No, "marjoram" is the old English name for any herb of the genus
    >Origanum.


    Okay

    >Origanum vulgare is wild marjoran, O. marjorana is sweet
    >marjoram, O. onites is either winter marjoram or pot marjoram, I can't
    >remember which, and so on.
    >
    >"Oregano" is the name of a flavour rather than a species of herb. It
    >includes O. Heracleoticum (sp?) and O. prismaticum as well as other
    >herbs not of the Origanum genus. In this country you can buy an
    >oregano mixture of seeds for the full range.


    So, in any case, all culinary marjoram and most culinary oregano is
    in the genus Origanum, but O. marjorana is never (or very seldomly)
    sold as oregano. I personally find the flavor differences between
    different types of culinary oregano, and the flavor difference between
    marjoram and the oreganos, to be of the same degree. That is I
    don't see it in its own separate category from the rest; they are
    all slightly different.


    Steve

  13. #13
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sprinkle smoked paprika instead of Spanish paprika on deviled eggs. Good.


    I know they must exist, but I'm unfamiliar with non-smoked Spanish
    paprika. I don't know that it gets imported to the U.S. often.

    Steve

  14. #14
    Janet Wilder Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On 3/20/2011 7:23 PM, Steve Pope wrote:
    > Janet Wilder<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> sprinkle smoked paprika instead of Spanish paprika on deviled eggs. Good.

    >
    > I know they must exist, but I'm unfamiliar with non-smoked Spanish
    > paprika. I don't know that it gets imported to the U.S. often.
    >
    > Steve



    I have a big canister of Tone's Spanish paprika from Sam's . That's
    regular paprika. I have a little bottle of McCormick's "smoked paprika"
    It is Spanish paprika that is "smoked over wood planks..."

    The two have very different flavors.

    --
    Janet Wilder
    Way-the-heck-south Texas
    Spelling doesn't count. Cooking does.

  15. #15
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Janet Wilder <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 3/20/2011 7:23 PM, Steve Pope wrote:


    >> I know they must exist, but I'm unfamiliar with non-smoked Spanish
    >> paprika. I don't know that it gets imported to the U.S. often.


    >I have a big canister of Tone's Spanish paprika from Sam's. That's
    >regular paprika. I have a little bottle of McCormick's "smoked paprika"
    >It is Spanish paprika that is "smoked over wood planks..."


    Thanks. I'll have to sometime try the unsmoked Spanish stuff.

    Fact is, there are too many paprikas in the world for me to keep
    them all on hand. I'm sure many of them are highly distinctive.


    Steve

  16. #16
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Mar 20, 4:58*pm, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > Bryan *<bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >I wouldn't have included the marjoram, but oregano, garlic, olive oil,
    > >black pepper, and salt is what I use to season lamb, meatballs or
    > >otherwise.

    >
    > Isn't marjoram just a sub-variety of oregano?


    I never knew how closely related marjoram was to the stuff I've always
    thought of as regular oregano. Do you think it's worth me buying some
    to use in addition to/instead of oregano for this use? I'm really
    looking forward to some lamb seasoned as above. I'd like to make it
    with tiny potatoes in a single pot, with a little twist of lemon after
    plating, and maybe a little cow's milk feta crumbled on top.
    >
    > Steve


    --Bryan

  17. #17
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I never knew how closely related marjoram was to the stuff I've always
    >thought of as regular oregano. Do you think it's worth me buying some
    >to use in addition to/instead of oregano for this use?


    Not sure. I did think the European marjoram / Mexican oregano blend
    worked well for the lamb meatballs, but it was simply the two such
    herbs I had on hand.

    Of course with this kind of herb, fresher is better.

    Steve

  18. #18
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 21:58:34 +0000 (UTC), Steve Pope wrote:

    > Bryan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I wouldn't have included the marjoram, but oregano, garlic, olive oil,
    >>black pepper, and salt is what I use to season lamb, meatballs or
    >>otherwise.

    >
    > Isn't marjoram just a sub-variety of oregano?


    Mexican oregano is a type a marjoram. Greek oregano is a different
    genus, IIRC.

    -sw

  19. #19
    mian afi143 Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update


    I tried my usual preparation (which includes
    garlic, olive oil, black pepper, and salt) but this time left out the
    smoked paprika, and included some European marjoram and Mexican
    oregano,
    along with a little cayenne.It can
    also make a mean mayo for sandwiches and potato salads.

    My most recent scallop
    preparation involved broiling, and adding olive oil and garlic
    for the last minute or so under the broiler.




    --
    mian afi143

  20. #20
    Lyndon Watson Guest

    Default Re: Lamb Meatball Update

    On Mar 21, 12:22*pm, spop...@speedymail.org (Steve Pope) wrote:
    > Lyndon Watson *<te...@clear.net.nz> wrote:
    > So, in any case, all culinary marjoram and most culinary oregano is
    > in the genus Origanum, but O. marjorana is never (or very seldomly)
    > sold as oregano.


    Right.

    * I personally find the flavor differences between
    > different types of culinary oregano, and the flavor difference between
    > marjoram and the oreganos, to be of the same degree. *That is I
    > don't see it in its own separate category from the rest; they are
    > all slightly different.


    I personally find the flavour of sweet marjoram, O. marjorana, to be
    quite distinct from the rest. It has a rather floral character rather
    than the resinous sort of character of the others.

    I would use oregano with lamb as others have said. Sweet marjoram
    goes especially well with beef, I think. I used to have a very good
    recipe for a beef meatloaf with lots of sweet marjoram in it.

    LW

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